Skip to main content

Home/ Diigo In Education/ Group items matching "fact" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Mark Gleeson

Who's running Quality Control and Fact Checking in a Tech Rich, Differentiated, Personalised Classroom? - 10 views

  •  
    At first glance, teachers may point to the fact that today's curriculum is not about content knowledge any more. It's about skill development, creativity, collaboration and communication. At a simplistic level, that may be partly true. We can't escape the fact, though, that accuracy and understanding is still paramount. While an 8 year old will survive making the odd misinterpretation or copying the wrong information down, a 20 year old medical student can't be confusing a pharynx with a larynx or thinking a 3:4 ratio means 3/4 and 1/4. So the question needs to be asked - How well are we dealing with Quality Control and fact Checking in the Differentiated, Personalised Classroom? This one question brings up a whole lot more questions that every teacher needs t0 consider.
Mark Smith

How facts backfire - The Boston Globe - 15 views

  • Recently, a few political scientists have begun to discover a human tendency deeply discouraging to anyone with faith in the power of information. It’s this: Facts don’t necessarily have the power to change our minds. In Fact, quite the opposite. In a series of studies in 2005 and 2006, researchers at the University of Michigan found that when misinformed people, particularly political partisans, were exposed to corrected Facts in news stories, they rarely changed their minds. In Fact, they often became even more strongly set in their beliefs. Facts, they found, were not curing misinformation. Like an underpowered antibiotic, Facts could actually make misinformation even stronger.
Carol Ansel

The Daring Librarian: Wikipedia is not wicked! - The Answer Sheet - The Washington Post - 70 views

  • Teaching Wikipedia in 5 Easy Steps: *Use it as background information *Use it for technology terms *Use it for current pop cultural literacy *Use it for the Keywords *Use it for the REFERENCES at the bottom of the page!
  • 4 ways to use Wikipedia (hint: never cite it) Teachers: Please stop prohibiting the use of Wikipedia 20 Little Known Ways to Use Wikipedia Study: Wikipedia as accurate as Encyclopedia Britannica Schiff, Stacy. “Know it all: Can Wikipedia conquer expertise?” The New Yorker, February 26, 2006 And: Yes students, there’s a world beyond Wikipedia **Several years ago, Nature magazine did a comparison of material available on Wikipedia and Brittanica and concluded that Brittanica was somewhat, but not overwhelmingly, more accurate than Wikipedia. Brittanica lodged a complaint, and here, you can see what it complained about as well as Nature’s response. Nature compared articles from both organizations on various topics and sent them to experts to review. Per article, the averages were: 2.92 mistakes per article for Britannica and 3.86 for Wikipedia. -0- Follow The Answer Sheet every day by bookmarking http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet. And for admissions advice, college news and links to campus papers, please check out our Higher Education page. Bookmark it! var entrycat = ' ' By Valerie Strauss  |  05:00 AM ET, 09/07/2011 .connect_widget .connect_widget_text .connect_widget_connected_text a {display:block;} #center {overflow:visible;} /*.override-width iframe {width:274px !important;}*/ Tumblr Reddit Stumbleupon Digg Delicious LinkedIn http://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.html#_=1315504289567&count=horizontal&counturl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Fblogs%2Fanswer-sheet%2Fpost%2F
  •  
    Excellent perspective on "The 'W' Word" - use it wisely for what it is - high school and college kids shouldn't be citing any general knowledge encyclopedias for serious research - but that doesn't mean there aren't some excellent uses for it.
mrshathaway

Evaluating a Website or Publication's Authority - Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers - 25 views

  • most of us would like to ascribe authority to sites and authors who support our conclusions and deny authority to publications that disagree with our worldview
  • Wikipedia’s guidelines for determining the reliability of publications. These guidelines were developed to help people with diametrically opposed positions argue in rational ways about the reliability of sources using common criteria.
  • defined by process, aim, and expertise.
  • ...11 more annotations...
  • fact-checkers of all political stripes are happy to be able to track a fact down to one of these publications since they have reputations for a high degree of accuracy, and issue corrections when they get facts wrong.
  • a reliable source for facts should have a process in place for encouraging accuracy, verifying facts, and correcting mistakes
  • Process
  • researchers and certain classes of professionals have expertise, and their usefulness is defined by that expertise
  • Expertise
  • while we often think researchers are more knowledgeable than professionals, this is not always the case
  • Reporters, on the other hand, often have no domain expertise
  • Aim
  • Aim is defined by what the publication, author, or media source is attempting to accomplish
  • One way to think about aim is to ask what incentives an article or author has to get things right
  • In general, you want to choose a publication that has strong incentives to get things right, as shown by both authorial intent and business model, reputational incentives, and history
Martin Burrett

Unnecessary Knowledge | Gain some knowledge! - 37 views

  •  
    This fun site has over 2,500 facts about almost everything. Most are interesting, some are just bizarre. Whether all facts are true, I can't say. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Cross+Curricular
Smith Shots

7 Facts About Differentiated Instruction - 6 views

  •  
    "7 Facts About Differentiated Instruction"
Sydney Lacey

Gapminder: Unveiling the beauty of statistics for a fact based world view. - Gapminder.org - 7 views

  •  
    Interesting of 'facts' and 'statistics' here - potentially useful, nonetheless, if used carefully.
  • ...3 more comments...
  •  
    Dynamic presentation of global statistical trends.
  •  
    Unveiling the beauty of statistics for a fact based world.
  •  
    Unveiling the beauty of statistics for a fact based world view. - Gapminder.org
  •  
    Great tool for visualizing data
  •  
    Visualizing data. Includes downloadable tools.
Betty Powell

EIA Kids Page - Energy Facts: Sources of Energy, Renewable and Non-renewable (Nonrenewable) - 0 views

  •  
    Energy Facts, games, history and activities for kids.
franzfume

38 Infographic Explores Mobile Phone Evolution - Facts & Figures (History & Statistics) | Geraldes's Blog - 38 views

  •  
    38 Infographic Explores Mobile Phone Evolution - Facts & Figures (History & Statistics)
Marc Hamlin

Teaching fact-checking to students using social media tools - 3 views

  •  
    I'm going to use this with my students to teach fact-checking vs. "seems legit" culture that pervades Twitter, Facebook, and other social media.
Roland Gesthuizen

How to Create Nonreaders - 58 views

  •  
    "In fact, it's not really possible to motivate anyone, except perhaps yourself.  If you have enough power, sure, you can make people, including students, do things.  That's what rewards (e.g., grades) and punishments (e.g., grades) are for.  But you can't make them do those things well ... The more you rely on coercion and extrinsic inducements, as a matter of fact, the less interest students are likely to have in whatever they were induced to do."
Siri Anderson

12 Facts Fact on Common Core | Stand for Children - 28 views

  •  
    Disturbing data on our lack of preparedness for current economy...from mcKinsey.
dabennett7

Homage or Theft? A Closer Look at the 'Blurred Lines' Verdict - Law Blog - WSJ - 18 views

  • A federal jury in Los Angeles on Tuesday ordered singers Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams to pay about $7.4 million to the family of Marvin Gaye, after finding the duo’s 2013 hit song “Blurred Lines” copied parts of Mr. Gaye’s “Got to Give it Up.”
    • dabennett7
       
      Attribution and intellectual property are a real concern for everyone. Remixing ideas is not a new practice, but in the 21st century it is easier than ever. How do we help prepare our students for careers in the 21st century?
  • only to compare “Blurred Lines” to the sheet music composition of “Got to Give it Up.” So the jury only heard a stripped down version of Mr. Gaye’s song, with his lyrics over a bass line and keyboards.
    • dabennett7
       
      Attribution and intellectual property are a real concern for everyone. Remixing ideas is not a new practice, but in the 21st century it is easier than ever. How do we help prepare our students for careers in the 21st century?
  • substantial copying
    • dabennett7
       
      From the arts to science, remixing and building upon the ideas of those who came before you is not new. In fact, it is a necessary practice that feeds the progress of our world.  Now musicians are haunted by this ghost of copyright. How can we develop and model practices for our students that celebrate the history of attribution and the growth of ideas? Can we elevate the student dreaded practices of citation and attribution to an act of reverence and respect?
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • Use extreme caution when referencing your forebears in song (without first getting permission, of course)
    • dabennett7
       
      From the arts to science, remixing and building upon the ideas of those who came before you is not new. In fact, it is a necessary practice that feeds the progress of our world.  Now musicians are haunted by this ghost of copyright. How can we develop and model practices for our students that celebrate the history of attribution and the growth of ideas? Can we elevate the student dreaded practices of citation and attribution to an act of reverence and respect?
  • It will cause people who want to want to evoke the past to perhaps refrain from doing so
    • dabennett7
       
      From the arts to science, remixing and building upon the ideas of those who came before you is not new. In fact, it is a necessary practice that feeds the progress of our world.  Now musicians are haunted by this ghost of copyright. How can we develop and model practices for our students that celebrate the history of attribution and the growth of ideas? Can we elevate the student dreaded practices of citation and attribution to an act of reverence and respect?
  • a step backward
    • dabennett7
       
      From the arts to science, remixing and building upon the ideas of those who came before you is not new. In fact, it is a necessary practice that feeds the progress of our world.  Now musicians are haunted by this ghost of copyright. How can we develop and model practices for our students that celebrate the history of attribution and the growth of ideas? Can we elevate the student dreaded practices of citation and attribution to an act of reverence and respect?
Nigel Coutts

Number Talks for Number Sense - The Learner's Way - 7 views

  •  
    "Number Talks" is an approach to the teaching and learning of Number Sense. Rather than relying on the rote-memorisation of isolated number facts achieved through drills of "table-facts", Number Talks aim to build confident, number fluency, where learners recognise patterns within and between numbers and understand the properties of numbers and operations. Number Talks are a "mind on" learning task that engages students in an active learning process as they search for patterns, decompose and recompose numbers and develop a flexible understanding.
Marianne Hart

The Creativity Crisis - Newsweek - 48 views

  • there is one crucial difference between IQ and CQ scores. With intelligence, there is a phenomenon called the Flynn effect—each generation, scores go up about 10 points. Enriched environments are making kids smarter. With creativity, a reverse trend has just been identified and is being reported for the first time here: American creativity scores are falling.
  • “Creativity can be taught,”
  • it’s left to the luck of the draw who becomes creative: there’s no concerted effort to nurture the creativity of all children
    • Brian C. Smith
       
      Students are labeled as "creative" if they display a knack for art or music, and sometimes in writing, however, they are rarely recognized as creative in math or science where a lot of creativity is not only needed, but excellent for learning within those very two disciplines.
    • Bill Genereux
       
      This is precisely why creativity education is important. It is needed everywhere, not just in the arts. Those teaching outside of arts education need to start recognizing the importance of creative thinking as well.
  • ...23 more annotations...
  • When faculty of a major Chinese university asked Plucker to identify trends in American education, he described our focus on standardized curriculum, rote memorization, and nationalized testing. “After my answer was translated, they just started laughing out loud,” Plucker says. “They said, ‘You’re racing toward our old model. But we’re racing toward your model, as fast as we can.’ ”
  • The argument that we can’t teach creativity because kids already have too much to learn is a false trade-off. Creativity isn’t about freedom from concrete facts. Rather, fact-finding and deep research are vital stages in the creative process.
  • When you try to solve a problem, you begin by concentrating on obvious facts and familiar solutions, to see if the answer lies there. This is a mostly left-brain stage of attack. If the answer doesn’t come, the right and left hemispheres of the brain activate together. Neural networks on the right side scan remote memories that could be vaguely relevant. A wide range of distant information that is normally tuned out becomes available to the left hemisphere, which searches for unseen patterns, alternative meanings, and high-level abstractions. Having glimpsed such a connection, the left brain must quickly lock in on it before it escapes. The attention system must radically reverse gears, going from defocused attention to extremely focused attention. In a flash, the brain pulls together these disparate shreds of thought and binds them into a new single idea that enters consciousness. This is the “aha!” moment of insight, often followed by a spark of pleasure as the brain recognizes the novelty of what it’s come up with. Now the brain must evaluate the idea it just generated. Is it worth pursuing? Creativity requires constant shifting, blender pulses of both divergent thinking and convergent thinking, to combine new information with old and forgotten ideas. Highly creative people are very good at marshaling their brains into bilateral mode, and the more creative they are, the more they dual-activate.
  • those who diligently practice creative activities learn to recruit their brains’ creative networks quicker and better
    • Ed Webb
       
      Surely, "more quickly"?
  • Creativity has always been prized in American society, but it’s never really been understood. While our creativity scores decline unchecked, the current national strategy for creativity consists of little more than praying for a Greek muse to drop by our houses. The problems we face now, and in the future, simply demand that we do more than just hope for inspiration to strike. Fortunately, the science can help: we know the steps to lead that elusive muse right to our doors.
    • Brian C. Smith
       
      Likely because it was out of necessity and the hardships of life. Not that we don't have hardships and necessities, but innovation has solved a lot of problems and automation has made skills and tasks easy.
  • What’s common about successful programs is they alternate maximum divergent thinking with bouts of intense convergent thinking, through several stages. Real improvement doesn’t happen in a weekend workshop. But when applied to the everyday process of work or school, brain function improves.
    • Brian C. Smith
       
      Everyday process of work or school... over time, consistent and non-prescriptive.
  • kids demonstrated the very definition of creativity: alternating between divergent and convergent thinking, they arrived at original and useful ideas. And they’d unwittingly mastered Ohio’s required fifth-grade curriculum—from understanding sound waves to per-unit cost calculations to the art of persuasive writing. “You never see our kids saying, ‘I’ll never use this so I don’t need to learn it,’ ” says school administrator Maryann Wolowiec. “Instead, kids ask, ‘Do we have to leave school now?’ ” Two weeks ago, when the school received its results on the state’s achievement test, principal Traci Buckner was moved to tears. The raw scores indicate that, in its first year, the school has already become one of the top three schools in Akron, despite having open enrollment by lottery and 42 percent of its students living in poverty.
  • project-based learning
  • highly creative adults frequently grew up with hardship. Hardship by itself doesn’t lead to creativity, but it does force kids to become more flexible—and flexibility helps with creativity.
  • When creative children have a supportive teacher—someone tolerant of unconventional answers, occasional disruptions, or detours of curiosity—they tend to excel. When they don’t, they tend to underperform and drop out of high school or don’t finish college at high rates. They’re quitting because they’re discouraged and bored, not because they’re dark, depressed, anxious, or neurotic. It’s a myth that creative people have these traits. (Those traits actually shut down creativity; they make people less open to experience and less interested in novelty.) Rather, creative people, for the most part, exhibit active moods and positive affect. They’re not particularly happy—contentment is a kind of complacency creative people rarely have. But they’re engaged, motivated, and open to the world.
  • solutions emerge from a healthy marketplace of ideas, sustained by a populace constantly contributing original ideas and receptive to the ideas of others
  • The age-old belief that the arts have a special claim to creativity is unfounded.
  • When scholars gave creativity tasks to both engineering majors and music majors, their scores laid down on an identical spectrum, with the same high averages and standard deviations. Inside their brains, the same thing was happening—ideas were being generated and evaluated on the fly.
  • The lore of pop psychology is that creativity occurs on the right side of the brain. But we now know that if you tried to be creative using only the right side of your brain, it’d be like living with ideas perpetually at the tip of your tongue, just beyond reach
  • those who diligently practice creative activities learn to recruit their brains’ creative networks quicker and better. A lifetime of consistent habits gradually changes the neurological pattern.
  • The home-game version of this means no longer encouraging kids to spring straight ahead to the right answer
  • The new view is that creativity is part of normal brain function.
  • “As a child, I never had an identity as a ‘creative person,’ ” Schwarzrock recalls. “But now that I know, it helps explain a lot of what I felt and went through.”
  • In China there has been widespread education reform to extinguish the drill-and-kill teaching style. Instead, Chinese schools are also adopting a problem-based learning approach.
  • fact-finding
  • problem-finding
  • Next, idea-finding
  • there is one crucial difference between IQ and CQ scores. With intelligence, there is a phenomenon called the Flynn effect—each generation, scores go up about 10 points. Enriched environments are making kids smarter. With creativity, a reverse trend has just been identified and is being reported for the first time here: American creativity scores are falling.
  •  
    For the first time, research shows that American creativity is declining. What went wrong-and how we can fix it.
Lee-Anne Patterson

Facts4Me - A Safe and Secure Research Site - 1 views

  •  
    Subscription site for Primary Students to find out information. Simple language and quality controled. Can email suggestions for topics to Sandy Morgan. Open to people helping contribute. No ads!
April Grybosky

Key Facts on Water Issues - 1 views

  •  
    List of Water Facts
Lara Kessler

Solar Energy Advantages Disadvantages and Solar Power information. - 0 views

  •  
    Facts about solar energy.
Martin Burrett

Welcome to About World Languages - 99 views

  •  
    A really interesting site that explores how world languages have developed, what they are related to and fascinating facts and trivia. A great background resource for any MFL student. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Languages%2C+Culture+%26+International+Projects
1 - 20 of 306 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page