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Thieme Hennis

Help Write a Children's Book Online at P2PU - 16 views

  • a new P2PU course that I am facilitating, Crowdsourced Art: A Participatory Exercise in Collaboration and Collective Creativity.
  • creativity should not be – and was never meant to be – the prerogative of a few chosen individuals.
  • This course will be an introduction to crowdsourced art, and an experiment in collective creativity. We’ll learn about crowdsourced art – the central topic of my PhD research – and we’ll work together to develop a children’s book about a snail called Hashtag and his adventures on the Internet.
Ed Webb

The Wired Campus - Duke Professor Uses 'Crowdsourcing' to Grade - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • Learning is more than earning an A says Cathy N. Davidson, the professor, who recently returned to teach English and interdisciplinary studies after eight years in administration. But students don't always see it that way. Vying for an A by trying to figure out what a professor wants or through the least amount of work has made the traditional grading scale superficial, she says.
  • "Do all the work, you get an A. Don't need an A? Don't have time to do all the work? No problem. You can aim for and earn a B. There will be a chart.  You do the assignment satisfactorily, you get the points.  Add up the points, there's your grade. Clearcut. No guesswork. No second-guessing 'what the prof wants.' No gaming the system," Ms. Davidson wrote Sunday in a blog post detailing her strategy on hastac.org (pronounced "haystack"), the acronym for  "humanities, arts, science, and technology-advanced collaboration.," which she co-founded.
  • It's important to teach students how to be responsible contributors to evaluations and assessment. Students are contributing and assessing each other on the Internet anyway, so why not make that a part of learning?"
Ruth Howard

An eBay for Science - Crowdsourcing.org - 65 views

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    For Profit network site for scientists and researchers
Trevor Cunningham

Maths Maps | edte.ch - 5 views

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    A crowdsourced marriage of math and geography.
Randolph Hollingsworth

CrowdGrader: Crowdsourcing the Evaluation of Homework Assignments - 57 views

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    Article on how their new crowdsourced grading platform worked for Computer Science students
Al Tucker

Interesting Ways | edte.ch - 90 views

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    Great resources full of great and practical ideas to use various technolgies by Tom Barrett. Share them with your colleagues!
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    The Interesting Ways series continues to be a great example of crowdsourcing good quality classroom ideas and it has been a privilege connecting with all of the people who have taken time to add an idea.
trisha_poole

Wikis in the Classroom: Three Ways to Increase Student Collaboration - Faculty Focus | Faculty Focus - 200 views

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    I've long said that professors who want to explore teaching with technology should begin with a social media tool rather than a Learning Management System. Web 2.0 tools are simple to use, invite student collaboration, and are usually less administratively clunky and complex than an LMS.One of the easiest and most powerful tools is the regular old wiki. Wikis are simply web pages that can be edited by their users. Instead of only carrying content from the administrator, they harness the power of crowdsourcing to create a powerful communal resource.
Lauren Rosen

A Declaration of Interdependence: - 5 views

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     a crowdsourced short film - YouTube. A short film on connectedness in the world in multiple languages. 
Donal O' Mahony

ICT and Social-media policy for school students | eLearning Island - 35 views

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    This is my latest blog post - it is about my draft ICT / Social media policy for secondary (high) schools. You can read and comment on it here. I would really like your feedback. Here is an excerpt! My primary source was Katie Lepi's Crowdsourced School Social Media Policy Now Available (here). Her work is based on over four-hundred crowd sourced edits! I have specifically included her in the Creative Commons license. I was also influenced by Doug Belshaw's Acceptable Use Policy - feedback required! (here).The comments on his posting are very interesting! I was inspired by Max Senge's A hippocratic Oath for Techies & Policymakers (here). Its simplicity is its strength!
Josephine Dorado

The Zed Omegas - 48 views

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    Social issues game that revolves around six dropouts crowdsourcing why education has failed them. From Ken Eklund, the creator of a World Without Oil, ED ZED OMEGA is like a documentary, except on social media. The main goal is to re-imagine education by sharing your experiences with these six disenchants.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Make Your Own E-Books with Pandoc - ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 80 views

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    learning how to make an e-book via crowdsourcing your own blog (example from sociologist Kieran Healy) - or online journal (example from J of Southern Religion) - or open-access book (Mark Sample's Hacking the Academy) - recommending Pandoc but also refers to Sigil, Anthologize
Cheryl Colan

Google Moderator - 86 views

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    Let your audience decideGet to know your audience by letting them decide which questions, suggestions or ideas interest them most.Everyone's voice is heardThe voting box at the top of page focuses attention on submissions recently added and on the rise, making it simple and easy to participate.Be creativeInclude people in your preparation for lectures, interviews and hard decisions or work together to organize feature requests and brainstorm new ideas.
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    "Get to know your audience by letting them decide which questions, suggestions or ideas interest them most. " This page kicks it off. Click the "Learn more" link to go to the how-to page.
anonymous

Google Moderator This I Believe about Learning - 0 views

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    Google Moderator Demonstration: Nine Beliefs about Learning Drawn from Stephanie Pace Marshall's The Power to Transform
Justin Medved

The Answer Factory: Demand Media and the Fast, Disposable, and Profitable as Hell Media Model | Magazine - 24 views

  • Pieces are not dreamed up by trained editors nor commissioned based on submitted questions. Instead they are assigned by an algorithm, which mines nearly a terabyte of search data, Internet traffic patterns, and keyword rates to determine what users want to know and how much advertisers will pay to appear next to the answers.
  • To appreciate the impact Demand is poised to have on the Web, imagine a classroom where one kid raises his hand after every question and screams out the answer. He may not be smart or even right, but he makes it difficult to hear anybody else.
  • But what Demand has realized is that the Internet gets only half of the simplest economic formula right: It has the supply part down but ignores demand. Give a million monkeys a million WordPress accounts and you still might never get a seven-point tutorial on how to keep wasps away from a swimming pool. Yet that’s what people want to know.
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  • That’s not to say there isn’t any room for humans in Demand’s process. They just aren’t worth very much. First, a crowdsourced team of freelance “title proofers” turn the algorithm’s often awkward or nonsensical phrases into something people will understand: “How to make a church-pew breakfast nook,” for example, becomes “How to make a breakfast nook out of a church pew.” Approved headlines get fed into a password-protected section of Demand’s Web site called Demand Studios, where any Demand freelancer can see what jobs are available. It’s the online equivalent of day laborers waiting in front of Home Depot. Writers can typically select 10 articles at a time; videographers can hoard 40. Nearly every freelancer scrambles to load their assignment queue with titles they can produce quickly and with the least amount of effort — because pay for individual stories is so lousy, only a high-speed, high-volume approach will work. The average writer earns $15 per article for pieces that top out at a few hundred words, and the average filmmaker about $20 per clip, paid weekly via PayPal. Demand also offers revenue sharing on some articles, though it can take months to reach even $15 in such payments. Other freelancers sign up for the chance to copyedit ($2.50 an article), fact-check ($1 an article), approve the quality of a film (25 to 50 cents a video), transcribe ($1 to $2 per video), or offer up their expertise to be quoted or filmed (free). Title proofers get 8 cents a headline. Coming soon: photographers and photo editors. So far, the company has paid out more than $17 million to Demand Studios workers; if the enterprise reaches Rosenblatt’s goal of producing 1 million pieces of content a month, the payouts could easily hit $200 million a year, less than a third of what The New York Times shells out in wages and benefits to produce its roughly 5,000 articles a month.
  • But once it was automated, every algorithm-generated piece of content produced 4.9 times the revenue of the human-created ideas. So Rosenblatt got rid of the editors. Suddenly, profit on each piece was 20 to 25 times what it had been. It turned out that gut instinct and experience were less effective at predicting what readers and viewers wanted — and worse for the company — than a formula.
  • Here is the thing that Rosenblatt has since discovered: Online content is not worth very much. This may be a truism, but Rosenblatt has the hard, mathematical proof. It’s right there in black and white, in the Demand Media database — the lifetime value of every story, algorithmically derived, and very, very small. Most media companies are trying hard to increase those numbers, to boost the value of their online content until it matches the amount of money it costs to produce. But Rosenblatt thinks they have it exactly backward. Instead of trying to raise the market value of online content to match the cost of producing it — perhaps an impossible proposition — the secret is to cut costs until they match the market value.
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    This is facinating!!!
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