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Thieme Hennis

123D Creature for iPad on the iTunes App Store - 2 views

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    "Create fantastic 3D characters like a pro with Autodesk 123D Creature. Design your Creature, then sculpt detailed features and paint on skin, fur, feathers, or whatever you imagine. Export your finished Creature as an image or 3D model, or have it 3D printed into a real sculpture!"
Martin Burrett

Autodesk 123D -- creature - 33 views

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    This is a 'must try' iPad app where you can design a 3D creature. Tap, drag and pinch your creation until it is just right and then 'paint' it with the patterns you want. It's a great resource to use alongside creative writing or science work. If you have access to a 3D printer you can even fabricate your design. Download the app at https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/123d-creature/id594014056. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/ICT+%26+Web+Tools
Carol Mortensen

Grypholump and other strange creatures of lore! - 1 views

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    A collection of curious creatures and odd tall tales. Artwork by Kyra McGuinness & words by Tim McGuinness. Are these animals, or just fancifuls. creatures of reality, or just random fantasy! You be the judge, but please don't hold a grudge, or we'll send the Ckick-eye to give you the stink-eye that's why! We hope you enjoy, our collection of beasties, and that sharing with friends you will employ.
Holly Barlaam

Your Inner Fish Teaching Tools - 49 views

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    "In Your Inner Fish, Neil Shubin tells the story of evolution by tracing the organs of the human body back millions of years, long before the first creatures walked the earth. By examining fossils and DNA, Shubin shows us that our hands actually resemble fish fins, our head is organized like that of a long-extinct jawless fish, and major parts of our genome look and function like those of worms and bacteria. We have compiled the figures from the book into a deck of PowerPoint slides for use in the classroom."
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    Thanks Holly. Great book too!
Martin Burrett

EekoWorld - 61 views

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    An environmental site for kids. Play games, watch animations and even design your own creatures. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/PSHE%2C+RE%2C+Citizenship%2C+Geography+%26+Environmental
Alison Westgate

Cantor, "The Nightmare of Romantic Idealism" - 0 views

  • With respect to man, he appears as a creator and thus as a divine figure; with respect to Zeus, he takes on the role of a rebel against divine authority and eventually of a tortured creature, thus becoming a symbol of human suffering at the hands of the gods.
  • But if one tries to align the characters in Frankenstein with traditional mythic archetypes, one runs into difficulties. Although Frankenstein at first seems to offer a potentially confusing array of mythic correspondences, by trying to sort out the mythic roles assigned to the central characters, we can approach the thematic heart of the book.
  • With respect to man, he appears as a creator and thus as a divine figure; with respect to Zeus, he takes on the role of a rebel against divine authority and eventually of a tortured creature, thus becoming a symbol of human suffering at the hands of the gods.
  • ...1 more annotation...
    • Alison Westgate
       
      You should read Percy Shelley's version of Prometheus.
Martin Burrett

Creat an Animal Ocean - 82 views

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    Make your own animated watery scene with this superb flash resource. Just drag and drop your sea creatures to where you want them. A great science activity for younger children. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Science
Martin Burrett

Cut the Rope - 103 views

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    A fun strategy game where players must cut ropes to feed the little creature. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Educational+Games
Martin Burrett

Spore - 129 views

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    Learn about how creatures are put together by making your own with this cool, well made site. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Science
Martin Burrett

Smithsonian Wild - 8 views

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    Search through thousands of photos from animal camera traps from all over the world. See some of the most allusive creatures in the wild. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Science
Martin Burrett

Foodchain Game - 108 views

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    A lovely science activity about food chains. Click and drag the creatures to the correct positions. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Science
Martin Burrett

When fish come to school, kids get hooked on science - 14 views

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    "A programme that brings live fish into classrooms to teach the fundamentals of biology not only helps students learn, but improves their attitudes about science, a new study finds. The study of nearly 20,000 K-12 students, who raised zebrafish from embryos over the course of a week, found that kids at all grade levels showed significant learning gains. They also responded more positively to statements such as "I know what it's like to be a scientist." The results, to be published by the journal PLOS Biology, suggest that an immersive experience with a living creature can be a particularly successful strategy to engage young people in science, technology, engineering and maths."
Martin Burrett

A Touch of Class - 108 views

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    A clicking 'Guess Who' game where you have to select the correct creatures for the characteristic. ictmagic.wikispaces.com/science
Thieme Hennis

Lifelong Kindergarten :: MIT Media Lab - 3 views

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    "Crickets are small programmable devices that can make things spin, light up, and play music. You can plug lights, motors, and sensors into a Cricket, then write computer programs to tell them how to react and behave. With Crickets, you can create musical sculptures, interactive jewelry, dancing creatures, and other artistic inventions -- and learn important math, science, and engineering ideas in the process. Crickets are based on more than a decade of NSF-funded educational research. Lifelong Kindergarten researchers collaborated with the LEGO company to create the first "programmable bricks," squeezing computational power into LEGO bricks. This research led to the LEGO MindStorms robotics kits, now used by millions of people around the world. While LEGO MindStorms is designed especially for making robots, Crickets are designed especially for making artistic creations. Crickets were refined in collaboration with the Playful Invention and Exploration (PIE) museum network, and are now sold as a product through the Playful Invention Company (PICO)."
Martin Burrett

Silk - 10 views

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    "Draw with ribbons of colourful light and make beautiful pieces of digital art. Try making fantastical creatures out of light, or explore symmetry in maths."
Martin Burrett

Solo: Learning Independently - 9 views

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    "We are social creatures. In most respects humans are an unremarkable species without many amazing abilities, such as great strength, big teeth or flying. But we have each other, and as a result we have prospered. The same is true in the classroom. We can do great things went we work together, but that is only true went we can work independly first. Independent learning doesn't necessararily mean that you must hide away in your hermitage without the aid of the outside world, but instead means that you decide your own path and what resources you need to travel sucessfully along it."
Marc Patton

dotEPUB - download any webpage as an e-book - 125 views

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    Really Like This >> dotEPUB -Download any Webpage as an e-book http://bit.ly/lOXUvZ #bookmarklet #ebook #edtech #elearning #tlchat #edchat
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    The suburb of Saffron Park lay on the sunset side of London, as red and ragged as a cloud of sunset. It was built of a bright brick throughout; its sky-line was fantastic, and even its ground plan was wild. It had been the outburst of a speculative builder, faintly tinged with art, who called its architecture sometimes Elizabethan and sometimes Queen Anne, apparently under the impression that the two sovereigns were identical. It was described with some justice as an artistic colony, though it never in any definable way produced any art. But although its pretensions to be an intellectual centre were a little vague, its pretensions to be a pleasant place were quite indisputable. The stranger who looked for the first time at the quaint red houses could only think how very oddly shaped the people must be who could fit in to them. Nor when he met the people was he disappointed in this respect. The place was not only pleasant, but perfect, if once he could regard it not as a deception but rather as a dream. Even if the people were not "artists," the whole was nevertheless artistic. That young man with the long, auburn hair and the impudent face-that young man was not really a poet; but surely he was a poem. That old gentleman with the wild, white beard and the wild, white hat-that venerable humbug was not really a philosopher; but at least he was the cause of philosophy in others. That scientific gentleman with the bald, egg-like head and the bare, bird-like neck had no real right to the airs of science that he assumed. He had not discovered anything new in biology; but what biological creature could he have discovered more singular than himself? Thus, and thus only, the whole place had properly to be regarded; it had to be considered not so much as a workshop for artists, but as a frail but finished work of art. A man who stepped into its social atmosphere felt as if he had stepped into a written comedy.
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    dotEPUB is software in the cloud that allows you to convert any webpage into an e-book
Martin Burrett

BBC - Bamzooki: Build and Play With Virtual Creatures - 2 views

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    Design and build virtual robots with this great download and site from the BBC. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/ICT+&+Web+Tools
James Spagnoletti

Göbekli Tepe -National Geographic Magazine--"Origin of Religion" - 36 views

    • James Spagnoletti
       
      Very cool photographs--take a look.  You will be doing your first art/artifact case studies this week. 
  • Most of the world's great religious centers, past and present, have been destinations for pilgrimages
  • Göbekli Tepe may be the first of all of them, the beginning of a pattern. What it suggests, at least to the archaeologists working there, is that the human sense of the sacred—and the human love of a good spectacle—may have given rise to civilization itself.
  • ...13 more annotations...
  • In the 1960s archaeologists from the University of Chicago had surveyed the region and concluded that Göbekli Tepe was of little interest. Disturbance was evident at the top of the hill, but they attributed it to the activities of a Byzantine-era military outpost.
  • Schmidt had come across the Chicago researchers' brief description of the hilltop and decided to check it out. On the ground he saw flint chips—huge numbers of them. "Within minutes of getting there," Schmidt says, he realized that he was looking at a place where scores or even hundreds of people had worked in millennia past.
  • s the months and years went by, Schmidt's team
  • found a second circle of stones, then a third, and then more. Geomagnetic surveys in 2003 revealed at least 20 rings piled together, higgledy-piggledy, under the earth
  • The pillars were big—the tallest are 18 feet in height and weigh 16 tons. Swarming over their surfaces was a menagerie of animal bas-reliefs, each in a different style, some roughly rendered, a few as refined and symbolic as Byzantine art.
  • The circles follow a common design. All are made from limestone pillars shaped like giant spikes or capital T's. Bladelike, the pillars are easily five times as wide as they are deep. They stand an arm span or more apart, interconnected by low stone walls. In the middle of each ring are two taller pillars, their thin ends mounted in shallow grooves cut into the floor.
  • "They hadn't yet mastered engineering." Knoll speculated that the pillars may have been propped up, perhaps by wooden posts.
  • To Schmidt, the T-shaped pillars are stylized human beings, an idea bolstered by the carved arms that angle from the "shoulders" of some pillars, hands reaching toward their loincloth-draped bellies.
  • The stones face the center of the circle—as at "a meeting or dance," Schmidt says—a representation, perhaps, of a religious ritual.
  • As for the prancing, leaping animals on the figures, he noted that they are mostly deadly creatures: stinging scorpions, charging boars, ferocious lions. The figures represented by the pillars may be guarded by them, or appeasing them, or incorporating them as totems.
  • The site may have been built, filled in, and built again for centuries.
  • Bewilderingly, the people at Göbekli Tepe got steadily worse at temple building.
  • The earliest rings are the biggest and most sophisticated, technically and artistically. As time went by, the pillars became smaller, simpler, and were mounted with less and less care. Finally the effort seems to have petered out altogether by 8200 B.C. Göbekli Tepe was all fall and no rise.
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