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Occupy Your Brain - 111 views

  • One of the most profound changes that occurs when modern schooling is introduced into traditional societies around the world is a radical shift in the locus of power and control over learning from children, families, and communities to ever more centralized systems of authority.
  • Once learning is institutionalized under a central authority, both freedom for the individual and respect for the local are radically curtailed.  The child in a classroom generally finds herself in a situation where she may not move, speak, laugh, sing, eat, drink, read, think her own thoughts, or even  use the toilet without explicit permission from an authority figure.
  • In what should be considered a chilling development, there are murmurings of the idea of creating global standards for education – in other words, the creation of a single centralized authority dictating what every child on the planet must learn.
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  • In “developed” societies, we are so accustomed to centralized control over learning that it has become functionally invisible to us, and most people accept it as natural, inevitable, and consistent with the principles of freedom and democracy.   We assume that this central authority, because it is associated with something that seems like an unequivocal good – “education” – must itself be fundamentally good, a sort of benevolent dictatorship of the intellect. 
  • We endorse strict legal codes which render this process compulsory, and in a truly Orwellian twist, many of us now view it as a fundamental human right to be legally compelled to learn what a higher authority tells us to learn.
  • And yet the idea of centrally-controlled education is as problematic as the idea of centrally-controlled media – and for exactly the same reasons.
  • The First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution was designed to protect all forms of communication, information-sharing, knowledge, opinion and belief – what the Supreme Court has termed “the sphere of intellect and spirit” – from government control.
  • by the mid-19th century, with Indians still to conquer and waves of immigrants to assimilate, the temptation to find a way to manage the minds of an increasingly diverse and independent-minded population became too great to resist, and the idea of the Common School was born.
  • We would keep our freedom of speech and press, but first we would all be well-schooled by those in power.
  • A deeply democratic idea — the free and equal education of every child — was wedded to a deeply anti-democratic idea — that this education would be controlled from the top down by state-appointed educrats.
  • The fundamental point of the Occupy Wall Street movement is that the apparatus of democratic government has been completely bought and paid for by a tiny number of grotesquely wealthy individuals, corporations, and lobbying groups.  Our votes no longer matter.  Our wishes no longer count.  Our power as citizens has been sold to the highest bidder.
  • Our kids are so drowned in disconnected information that it becomes quite random what they do and don’t remember, and they’re so overburdened with endless homework and tests that they have little time or energy to pay attention to what’s happening in the world around them.
  • If in ten years we can create Wikipedia out of thin air, what could we create if we trusted our children, our teachers, our parents, our neighbors, to generate community learning webs that are open, alive, and responsive to individual needs and aspirations?  What could we create if instead of trying to “scale up” every innovation into a monolithic bureaucracy we “scaled down” to allow local and individual control, freedom, experimentation, and diversity?
  • The most academically “gifted” students excel at obedience, instinctively shaping their thinking to the prescribed curriculum and unconsciously framing out of their awareness ideas that won’t earn the praise of their superiors.  Those who resist sitting still for this process are marginalized, labeled as less intelligent or even as mildly brain-damaged, and, increasingly, drugged into compliance.
  • the very root, the very essence, of any theory of democratic liberty is a basic trust in the fundamental intelligence of the ordinary person.   Democracy rests on the premise that the ordinary person — the waitress, the carpenter, the shopkeeper — is competent to make her own judgments about matters of domestic policy, international affairs, taxes, justice, peace, and war, and that the government must abide by the decisions of ordinary people, not vice versa.  Of course that’s not the way our system really works, and never has been.   But most of us recall at some deep level of our beings that any vision of a just world relies on this fundamental respect for the common sense of the ordinary human being.
  • This is what we spend our childhood in school unlearning. 
  • If before we reach the age of majority we must submit our brains for twelve years of evaluation and control by government experts, are we then truly free to exercise our vote according to the dictates of our own common sense and conscience?  Do we even know what our own common sense is anymore?
  • We live in a country where a serious candidate for the Presidency is unaware that China has nuclear weapons, where half the population does not understand that Saddam Hussein had nothing to do with 9/11, where nobody pays attention as Congress dismantles the securities regulations that limit the power of the banks, where 45% of American high school students graduate without knowing that the First Amendment of the Constitution guarantees freedom of the press.   At what point do we begin to ask ourselves if we are trying to control quality in the wrong way?
  • Human beings, collaborating with one another in voluntary relationships, communicating and checking and counter-checking and elaborating and expanding on one another’s knowledge and intelligence, have created a collective public resource more vast and more alive than anything that has ever existed on the planet.
  • But this is not a paeon to technology; this is about what human intelligence is capable of when people are free to interact in open, horizontal, non-hierarchical networks of communication and collaboration.
  • Positive social change has occurred not through top-down, hierarchically controlled organizations, but through what the Berkana Institute calls “emergence,” where people begin networking and forming voluntary communities of practice. When the goal is to maximize the functioning of human intelligence, you need to activate the unique skills, talents, and knowledge bases of diverse individuals, not put everybody through a uniform mill to produce uniform results. 
  • You need a non-punitive structure that encourages collaboration rather than competition, risk-taking rather than mistake-avoidance, and innovation rather than repetition of known quantities.
  • if we really want to return power to the 99% in a lasting, stable, sustainable way, we need to begin the work of creating open, egalitarian, horizontal networks of learning in our communities.
  • They are taught to focus on competing with each other and gaming the system rather than on gaining a deep understanding of the way power flows through their world.
  • And what could we create, what ecological problems could we solve, what despair might we alleviate, if instead of imposing our rigid curriculum and the destructive economy it serves on the entire world, we embraced as part of our vast collective intelligence the wisdom and knowledge of the world’s thousands of sustainable indigenous cultures?
  • They knew this about their situation: nobody was on their side.  Certainly not the moneyed classes and the economic system, and not the government, either.  So if they were going to change anything, it had to come out of themselves.
  • As our climate heats up, as mountaintops are removed from Orissa to West Virginia, as the oceans fill with plastic and soils become too contaminated to grow food, as the economy crumbles and children go hungry and the 0.001% grows so concentrated, so powerful, so wealthy that democracy becomes impossible, it’s time to ask ourselves; who’s educating us?  To what end?  The Adivasis are occupying their forests and mountains as our children are occupying our cities and parks.  But they understand that the first thing they must take back is their common sense. 
  • They must occupy their brains.
  • Isn’t it time for us to do the same?
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    Carol Black, creator of the documentary, "Schooling the World" discusses the conflicting ideas of centralized control of education and standardization against the so-called freedom to think independently--"what the Supreme Court has termed 'the sphere of intellect and spirit" (Black, 2012). Root questions: "who's educating us? to what end?" (Black, 2012).
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    This is a must read. Carol Black echoes here many of the ideas of Paulo Freire, John Taylor Gatto and the like.
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Educade | Find, create and share lesson plans and teaching tools to empower your classroom - 3 views

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    DIY Lesson plans and materials for K12 and above. Very cool platform. Example project: USE MAKEY MAKEY TO DESIGN A VIDEOGAME CONTROLLER Students design and make CONTROLlers with clay, Play-Doh, bananas, or whatever they desire and link their CONTROLler through circuits to their laptop with this innovative circuit board kit. GRADE LEVEL: 4-9 Created by Agustin Molfino Curriculum Writer PLATFORM TYPE LIKE SHARE
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The 7 Best Free Remote Control Apps for the iPhone - 96 views

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    variety of free iPhone apps for controlling all kinds of things including ppt type presentations
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DMCA Rules Regarding Access-Control Technology Exemptions - The Library Today (Library ... - 4 views

  • Persons who circumvent access controls in order to engage in noninfringing uses of works in these six classes will not be subject to the statutory prohibition against circumvention.
    • Dallas McPheeters
       
      New DMCA copyright rules for 2010 in Education, etc.
  • The purpose of the proceeding is to determine whether current technologies that control access to copyrighted works are diminishing the ability of individuals to use works in lawful, noninfringing ways.
  • purpose
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  • when circumvention is accomplished solely in order to accomplish the incorporation of short portions of motion pictures into new works for the purpose of criticism or comment
  • (ii) Documentary filmmaking;(iii) Noncommercial videos
    • Dallas McPheeters
       
      Broad definition here.
    • Barbara Pittman
       
      what is a "short portion"?
  • enable used wireless telephone handsets to connect to a wireless telecommunications network
  • I agree with the Register that the record demonstrates that it is sometimes necessary to circumvent access controls on DVDs in order to make these kinds of fair uses of short portions of motion pictures.
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Paperless Tiger « buckenglish - 0 views

  • Does this jettisoning of time-honored titles mean that the paperless classroom is also lacking a creator, controller and grader?  Is the paperless classroom also a teacherless paradigm?  The answer is in some regards, yes.  I have removed myself from center stage.  I have relinquished the need to control every class.  I have stopped seeing work as stagnant…completed and submitted by students and then graded by me.  I have let go of my need to pre-plan months at a time, in favor of following the path that unfolds as we learn together.  My classes are not, however, teacherless, just less about the teaching and more about the learning.  The students know that I am ready and willing to be student to their insights, that they can teach, create, control and even evaluate their own learning.
  • In the absence of my control, the students have many choices to make
  • Teachers often say that modern students are lazy.  I have long felt that as the shifting winds of technology began to gain force, we teachers were the ones who were unwilling to do the work of rethinking our roles and meeting the students were they were learning already.  Rethinking paper as the primary tool of class is a step in the right direction because it forces a rethinking of the how and why of teaching and learning.
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Teacher Magazine: Stepping Aside: The Art of Working With Student-Teachers - 1 views

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    Stepping Aside: The Art of Working With Student-Teachers\n\nTeacher Leaders Network Although traditional teacher-education programs rely on veteran educators to invite student- or "practice-" teachers into their classrooms, many skilled professionals can be heard expressing some reluctance about sharing instructional responsibilities with green recruits. They may be concerned about their ability to mentor an inexperienced colleague effectively, or simply hesitant to relinquish control of instruction in an atmosphere of high-stakes accountability.\n\nIn a recent post to the Teacher Leaders Network Forum daily discussion group, veteran teacher Vicky expressed some reservations of her own about working with a student-teacher and asked for help.\n\nI may be getting the opportunity to work with a student-teacher. I was wondering about your ideas for starting the year off right, helping the student-teacher, and balancing the load of mentoring the student teacher and teaching the students myself. I'm excited about the possibility, but I'm also a pretty hands-on control freak kind of person, so I want to alternately challenge and excite the intern but not be unfair or scary. Tips?\n\nNancy, a veteran K-12 music teacher, replied:\n\nGreat questions, Vicky. My first suggestion would be adopting the perspective that you will learn as much as the novice teacher-about yourself, your beliefs, and your practice. The first step is probably building a relationship in which the novice teacher trusts you enough to share real information and opinion (and vice-versa).\n\nCreate a safe space to communicate honestly, in both directions. A student teacher who feels comfortable enough to share fears, anxieties, confusion, and frustration-and knows that he or she is not being judged, but honored as a learner by a veteran teacher who also has fears and frustrations-will be a student teacher who can grow.\n\nMy second thought is that from your students' perspective there should be two experts
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Official Google Blog: Safety Mode: giving you more control on YouTube - 88 views

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    With just one click better control on what is visable on youtube .
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    Taught me something. I was not aware of this "opt-in."
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Windows Live Family Safety: Free Parental Internet Controls » Summit Series f... - 20 views

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    Are you worried about what your children are doing on the Internet? Well, help is at hand from the free parental internet controls that Microsoft offers as part of its Windows Live Essentials suite. The setup procedure is quick and easy.
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Summit Series for Family » Using the iPad and iPod Touch: Parental Controls E... - 73 views

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    Apple's mobile computing options are an intuitive way for kids to explore the digital age. However, it is important to set limits. The iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch parental controls do just that. Here's how they work.
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Mobile Mouse for the iPhone, iPod & iPad - 104 views

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    "Instantly transform your iPhone or iPod touch into motion based mouse, trackpad, and wireless remote for your computer! Sit back and surf the web, browse your photo library or control your music player from the comfort of your couch. Our app uses the built in accelerometer to translate your hand motions into mouse movements on your screen. It can also operate as a trackpad, allowing you to control your computer with a single finger."
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A gradient of childhood self-control predicts health, wealth, and public safety - 40 views

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    paper on self-control as a predictor of health, wealth, and public safety
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Colorado Senate Advances Strict Gun Control Measures - NYTimes.com - 1 views

  • After more than 12 hours of emotional and bitterly divided debate, the Democratic-controlled State Senate gave preliminary approval to a package of gun bills. At its heart are measures that would require universal background checks for private gun sales and limit ammunition magazines to 15 rounds. Other measures would create a fee for background checks; require those convicted of domestic abuse to surrender their firearms; and require residents applying for permits to carry concealed weapons to take in-person training classes, outlawing the handful of online-only courses now offered in the state.
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Animacions de McGraw Hill en castell¡a (hispano) - 0 views

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    Animacions de McGraw Hill en castellà (hispano): Spanish Animations Actividad citotóxica de las células T contra las células blanco Antigenos dependientes de las células T Bomba de intercambio sodio-potasio Bomba de intercambio sodio-potasio Canales controlados por la diferencia de potencial y el potencial de acción Caracteristicas únicas de la meiosis Combinación de conmutadores: el operón lac Cómo bloquean la división celular los genes supresores de tumores Cómo surgen los priones Comparación de meiosis y mitosis Conjugación bacteriana: Transferencia de un plásmido Contracción del sarcómero control del ciclo celular control del la expresión génica en eucariotas Duplicación del ADN bidireccional Efecto de las ondas de sonido en las estructuras cocleares Elaboración de vacunas El represor de triptófano Endocitosis y exocitosis Endonucleasas de restricción Espermatogénesis Estimulación de la replicación celular Experimento de Hershey y Chase Experimento de Meselson y Stahl Factores de transcripcion Fases de la meiosis Fotofosforilación ciclica y no ciclica Función de la sinapsis neuromuscular Hipersensibilidad mediada por IgE (tipo I) Hormonas y secreción gástrica Horquilla de replicación del ADN La replicación del ADN Lisosomas Mecanismo de acción de la hormona esteroide Mitosis y citocinesis Movimiento del oxigeno y del dióxido de carbono en el cuerpo Orientación aleatoria de los cromosomas durante la meiosis Pasos en la clonación de un gen Polimorfismos de longitud de fragmento por enzima de restricción (RFLP) Procesamiento del ARN por parte de los espliceosomas Procesamiento de la información de los genes: Procariotas frente a eucariotas Producción de anticuerpos monoclonales Propagación del potencial de acción en un axón sin mielina Reacción en cadena de la polimerasa Replicación del VIH Retroinhibición de las vias bioquimicas Segundos mensajeros:cAMP Sintesis de proteinas Sistema de transporte de electrones y sintes
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Who's running Quality Control and Fact Checking in a Tech Rich, Differentiated, Persona... - 10 views

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    At first glance, teachers may point to the fact that today's curriculum is not about content knowledge any more. It's about skill development, creativity, collaboration and communication. At a simplistic level, that may be partly true. We can't escape the fact, though, that accuracy and understanding is still paramount. While an 8 year old will survive making the odd misinterpretation or copying the wrong information down, a 20 year old medical student can't be confusing a pharynx with a larynx or thinking a 3:4 ratio means 3/4 and 1/4. So the question needs to be asked - How well are we dealing with Quality Control and Fact Checking in the Differentiated, Personalised Classroom? This one question brings up a whole lot more questions that every teacher needs t0 consider.
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Flipping the Switches on Facebook's Privacy Controls - NYTimes.com - 31 views

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    A description of what FB can do with your actions, posts and clicks and how you can control what FB does with that information.  Sort of.
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UKEdResources - Keeping you in Control of Your Shared Resources - 44 views

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    New resource service launched, allowing teachers to keep control of their resources.
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15 Awesome iPhone-controlled Robots - 42 views

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    Videos showing several kinds of robots, including Lego Mindstorms, controlled by smart phones.
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It is Personal and Dangerous Now | Rethinking Learning - Barbara Bray - 54 views

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    "Teachers need to know how to facilitate a different kind of learning environment that is flexible, personal, and creative. Personalized learning means that learners own and drive their learning not the technology using algorithms based on performance that controls learning. Learners need to learn how to think on their own. This will not happen if adaptive learning systems control how and what they learn."
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Create, Engage, Assess through Mobile Devices. | Interactive Lessons | Mobile Learning ... - 51 views

shared by Judy Robison on 01 May 14 - No Cached
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    Nearpod makes presentations possible in a way that was previously impossible. It gives the presenter controls that they wouldn't have with a standard PowerPoint presentation (and it's free). Teachers send the digital presentation out to student devices and control what students see. Students interact and respond to the presentation, and the teacher can monitor student progress.
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