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Mariusz Leś

EBSCOhost: Lista wyników: cloud and computing - 33 views

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    On the Clouds: A New Way of Computing. By: Yan Han. Information Technology & Libraries, Jun2010, Vol. 29 Issue 2, p87-92, 6p, 1 Black and White Photograph, 1 Diagram; Abstract: This article introduces cloud computing and discusses the author's experience "on the clouds." The author reviews cloud computing services and providers, then presents his experience of running multiple systems (e.g., integrated library systems, content management systems, and repository software). He evaluates costs, discusses advantages, and addresses some issues about cloud computing. Cloud computing fundamentally changes the ways institutions and companies manage their computing needs. Libraries can take advantage of cloud computing to start an IT project with low cost, to manage computing resources cost-effectively, and to explore new computing possibilities. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]; (AN 50741403) Tematy: CLOUD computing; COMMUNICATION in learning & scholarship; INTEGRATED library systems (Computer systems); INSTITUTIONAL repositories; LIBRARIES -- Automation; ACADEMIC libraries; INFORMATION technology; EFFECT of technological innovations on Baza danych: Academic Search Complete
Steve Kelly

What would an exceptional middle and high school computer science curriculum include? - Quora - 48 views

  • What would an exceptional middle and high school computer science curriculum include?
  • This isn't a complete answer, but one thing the very first introductory classes should require is that the students turn off all their electronic computers and actually learn to walk through  algorithms with a computer that exists only on paper. (Or, I suppose, a whiteboard or a simulator.) This exercise would give the students a grounding in what is going on inside the computer as a very low level.My first computer programming class in my Freshman year of high school was completely on paper. Although it was done because the school didn't have much money, it turned out to be very beneficial.Another class I had in high school, that wouldn't normally be lumped into a Computer Science curriculum but has been a boon to my career, was good old Typing 101.
  • If you followed the CS Unplugged curriculum your students would know more about CS than most CS grads:http://csunplugged.orgIt's a really great intro to basic computer science concepts and very easy for students to understand.  Best of all you don't even need a computer per student if your school doesn't have the budget,
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  • For younger students, I think that the ability to make something professional-looking, like a real grown-up would, is paramount.  Sadly, I think this means that LOGO and BASIC aren't much use any more*.
  • So, we have a few choices.  You can try to write phone apps that look just like real phone apps, design interactive websites that look just like real interactive websites, or do something with embedded systems / robotics.  Avoid the temptation to make these things into group projects; the main thing every student needs to experience is the process of writing code, running it, debugging it, and watching the machine react to every command.
  • It is important to consider what an 11 to 18-year old is familiar with in terms of mathematics and logical thinking. An average 11-year old is probably learning about fractions, simple cartesian geometry, the concept of units, and mathematical expressions. By 15, the average student will be taking algebra, and hopefully will have the all-important concept of variables under his/her belt. So much in CS is dependent on solid understanding that symbols and tokens can represent abstract concepts, values, or algorithms. Without it, it's still possible to teach CS, but it must be done in a very different way (see Scratch).
  • At this point, concepts such as variables, parenthesis matching, and functions (of the mathematical variety) are within easy reach. Concepts like parameter passing, strings and collections, and program flow should be teachable. More advanced concepts such as recursion, references and pointers, certain data structures, and big-O may be very difficult to teach without first going through some more foundational math.
  • I tend to agree strongly with those that believe a foundational education should inspire interest and enforce concepts and critical thinking over teaching any specific language, framework, system, or dogma.
  • The key is that the concepts in CS aren't just there for the hell of it. Everything was motivated by a real problem, and few things are more satisfying than fixing something you really want to work with a cool technique or concept you just learned.
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    Great resource for teachers (especially those of us not initially trained in Computer Science) about what should 'count' as Computer Science.  Worth the read!
Jonathan Schmid

Jolicloud - Joli OS - 84 views

  • Joli OS is a free and easy way to turn any computer up to 10 years old into a cool new cloud device. Get on the Web and instantly connect to all your Web apps, files and services using the computer you already own. You may never need to buy a new computer again. It’s easy. Just download Joli OS. It installs in just 10 minutes.
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    Joli OS is a free and easy way to turn any computer up to 10 years old into a cool new cloud device. Get on the Web and instantly connect to all your Web apps, files and services using the computer you already own. You may never need to buy a new computer again. It's easy. Just download Joli OS. It installs in just 10 minutes.
Roland Gesthuizen

Computer Science Teachers Association - 44 views

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    "The Computer Science Teachers Association is a membership organization that supports and promotes the teaching of computer science and other computing disciplines. CSTA provides opportunities for K-12 teachers and students to better understand the computing disciplines and to more successfully prepare themselves to teach and learn."
Martin Burrett

@Digicoled's Digest - Computing, for all? - 3 views

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    "Evidence gathered from The Royal Society showed that "pedagogies for computing in schools remain less developed than those for other subjects", and that "the provision of the subject at GCSE was sporadic". Recommendations from the report suggest a push to realise the ambition of recent curriculum and qualifications reforms, to improve gender balance in computing, and ensure there is a strong supply of computing teachers entering the profession."
Roland Gesthuizen

iPad: The Microwave Oven of Computing | Techinch - 86 views

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    "Last year, Apple introduced the iPad, a computing device many have struggled to classify. It's bigger than a smartphone or iPod, smaller than a computer, but can do some things you'd otherwise do on both of these. You can type a document in Pages or find your way with GPS and Google Maps. So what makes it so special? "
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    Nice analogy that sits well for teachers trying to figure out where tablet devices fit into schools filled with traditional computers.
Siri Anderson

Artificial intelligence | Playlist | TED.com - 13 views

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    I used to promote teaching K-8 computational thinking and coding because of the social justice issues around access to the language of power, economic opportunities, and a belief that learning CT enhances overall academic competencies for those likely to be challenged to succeed in schools.. Now I'm an advocate for a different set of reasons that seem more preeminent. We need everyone to learn computational thinking because ethics and protecting the right to spirituality/secular humanist values seem to be what computers won't be able to do better than humans. Therefore we better have humans who are ethically grounded, informed by the humanities, and competent to understand the implications of the computer software we create. This is a great watch list or podcast list to spur considerations of this urgent matter of the unregulated world of AI.
paul lowe

Technology Dictionary - 3 views

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    Our Technology Dictionary has over 14,000 technology and computer related terms. The Technology Dictionary consists of definitions of IT and computer terms including but not limited to programming languages, software, hardware, operating systems, networking, mathematics, telecomunications, electronics, and more. The Technology Dictionary is based on the FOLDOC (The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing) compiled and maintained by Denis Howe. We add new definitions to our dictionary daily, and if you want to contribute something, don't hesitate to contact us. If you like the site bookmark it and tell your friends about it.
Mr. Carver

The rise of the Digital Refuseniks - Newspaper Tree El Paso - 0 views

  • re•fuse•nik (n) somebody who refuses to agree to, take part in, or cooperate with something, especially on grounds of principle (informal) Why do I think people are Refuseniks? Let's look at a little history: The first major introduction of computers into the classroom took place, essentially with the introduction of the Apple II-e computer. The Apple II-e was introduced in 1983 and became a staple of campuses around the world. So, in order to keep things simple, let’s just say it was 1985 by the time Apple II-e’s really hit it big in the classroom. So, without too much mathematical calculation going on here, it is not a stretch to say that computers have been in the schools for at least 24 years. A teacher, even with 35 years experience today, will have had 63% of their professional life exposed to computers in their work environment. A teacher with less than 24 years of experience will have not known a school without a computer.
    • Mr. Carver
       
      That is not necessarily a fair assessment as computers were not in CLASSROOMS. Most schools had a lab where you went to work on the computers they weren't readily available for use.
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    Refusenik is a good term for those who refuse to integrate technology. Luddite is another good term.
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    Refusenik is a good term for those who refuse to integrate technology. Luddite is another good term.
Roland Gesthuizen

Free Computer books Download | Online computer ebooks | online free computer science ebooks - 158 views

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    "Freebookcentre.net contains links to thousands of free online technical books. Which Include core computer science, networking, programming languages, Systems Programming books, Linux books and many more."
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    Great collection of Computer Science, Physics, Mathematics and Electronics books.
Julie Whitehead

Free Computer Training at GCFLearnFree.org - 46 views

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    From Computer Basics to Microsoft Office to Facebook,free computer tutorials including video and quizzess
Tonya Thomas

Future Work Skills 2020 - 3 views

  • Transdisciplinarity: literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines. More about transdisciplinarity.Virtual collaboration: ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team. More about virtual collaboration.Sense-making: ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed. More about sense-making.Social intelligence: ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions. More about social intelligence.Cross-cultural competency: ability to operate in different cultural settings. More about cross-cultural competency.Cognitive load management: ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques. More about cognitive load management.Novel and adaptive thinking: proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based. More about novel and adaptive thinking.Computational thinking: ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning. More about computational thinking.New media literacy: ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication. More about new media literacy. More about new media literacy.Design mindset: ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes. More about design mindset.
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    "Transdisciplinarity: literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines. More about transdisciplinarity. Virtual collaboration: ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team. More about virtual collaboration. Sense-making: ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed. More about sense-making. Social intelligence: ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions. More about social intelligence. Cross-cultural competency: ability to operate in different cultural settings. More about cross-cultural competency. Cognitive load management: ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques. More about cognitive load management. Novel and adaptive thinking: proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based. More about novel and adaptive thinking. Computational thinking: ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning. More about computational thinking. New media literacy: ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication. More about new media literacy. More about new media literacy. Design mindset: ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes. More about design mindset."
Roland Gesthuizen

Fractals without a Computer! | Good Math, Bad Math - 32 views

  • We tend to think of fractals in computational terms, because in general we generate fractal images using digital computers. But you don’t need to. Fractals are actually fascinatingly ubiquitous, and you can produce them in lots of different ways – not just digitally.
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    "In this video, what they've done is set up three screens, in a triangular pattern, and set them to display the input from a camera.. If you watch, they're able to manipulate it to get Julia fractals, Sierpinski triangles, and several other really famous fractals. "
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    Fractals without a Computer
Greg Brandenburg

Bringing Girls and Boys to Computer Science with 'Alice' - 1 views

  • Attracting females is key to the future of computer science, Rodger says. In 2008, only 11.8 percent of U.S. bachelor's degrees in computer science went to women, according to the Computing Research Association. And Duke's showing is hardly better, said Rodger, who is trying to turn that around by making programming fun to learn.
Marita Thomson

One Year Later: Assessing the Impact of iPads on Education - iPads in Education - 136 views

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    Mobile digital devices rocketed to popularity around 10 years ago with the release of the iPod. Mobile computing went mainstream with the release of the iPhone in 2007. With the release of the iPad just one year ago, we are now seeing a significant shift in the dynamics of computer purchase and practice - moving away from desktops and laptops to iPads and other mobile devices. Their cost relative to laptops along with the promise of mobile computing has raised tremendous interest in iPad use in education.
Julie Whitehead

Will the Real Digital Native Please Stand Up? -- Campus Technology - 2 views

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    I have personally experienced this in the college level computer class I teach. Even those students that think they know computers and are an expert, don't know how to use the computer in a work environment to solve problems and critically assess ideas. They google something and only look at 1 source and even cite that course
Roland Gesthuizen

Computer Science for High School: Computing and Information Systems, University of Melbourne - 34 views

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    CS4HS is an initiative sponsored by Google to promote Computer Science and Computational Thinking in the secondary curriculum. This page lists CS4HS activities hosted at the University of Melbourne.
Gil Anspacher

ISTE | CT Toolkit - 4 views

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    Computational Thinking: A mix of critical thinking skills and computer technology process skills. Lots of very useful resources for CT.
C CC

Feature: Computer Science Competition Encourages Pupil Ideas - 11 views

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    Encouraging pupils to develop computer science ideas
Roland Gesthuizen

A Critique of Technocentrism in Thinking About the School of the Future - 33 views

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    "So we are entering this computer future; but what will it be like? What sort of a world will it be? There is no shortage of experts, futurists, and prophets who are ready to tell us, but they don't agree. The Utopians promise us a new millennium, a wonderful world in which the computer will solve all our problems. The computer critics warn us of the dehumanizing effect of too much exposure to machinery, and of disruption of employment in the workplace and the economy. Who is right? Well, both are wrong -- because they are asking the wrong question"
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