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Randy Cambou

Health Care Ruling: How Court Rose Above Partisan Politics | TIME.com - 0 views

    • Randy Cambou
       
      Read the Article on the Decision of the Court that is linked here as well
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    Supreme Court Reading Highlighting the Court Decision on Health Care.  Click on the links within the article (Especially the sections on Time's complete coverage of the Health Care Act.)
Jon Tanner

What's the point of media specialists...? on School Library Journal - 49 views

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    "Joyce Valenza Ph.D On the librarian: What's the point . . ? The Twitter conversation April 30, 2009 @karlfisch: What's the point of having a media specialist if they aren't specialists in the media forms of the day? I was nearly finished copying and pasting, figuring out how best to post Tuesday's Twitter conversation, when I discovered that Karl Fisch (@karlfisch), who kinda started it all, already took care of that. (You likely know of Karl's very popular and provocative videos.) I am still not sure how best to frame this conversation on the place of the information/media specialist in today's school. What is clear is that a lot of smart people--people who are out there teaching, speaking, moving, and shaking--are disappointed in what they see when they see school librarians. Either we have a perception problem or we need to do some serious retooling. I'd say we have to deal with both. In a hurry. Being an information (or media) specialist today means being an expert in how information and media flow TODAY! It is about knowing how information and media are created and communicated. How to evalute, synthesize, and ethically use information and media in all their varied forms. It is about being able to communicate knowlege in new ways for new audiences using powerful new information and communication tools. Forgive me if it hurts. In my mind, if you are not an expert in new information and communication tools, you are NOT a media specialist for today. Tuesday's conversation happened in the open, on Twitter. We need to be aware that these conversations are happening where we cannot hear them--at conferences, at Board and cabinet meetings. We also need to make sure that our voices are heard and that we hear the voices of others in places like Twitter, where so many educational leaders and thinkers are chatting about us and many other things. I've selected the remarks that resonated loudest for me. (I've shuffled a bit, but you can visit Karl'
Josh Flores

TODAYMoms - Should parents be blamed when kids fail at school? - 106 views

    • Josh Flores
       
      Who the heck would click "NO"???
    • Josh Flores
       
      Parents should be held accountable, teachers should be held accountable AND students should be held accountable.
    • Josh Flores
       
      from Lynn Jones (to me?) "How many children do you have? I am an educator and I have 6 children who are all different. My second child, a son, was never told to study, never had a spelling word called out to him, and strieved to make all A's and B's since the 2nd grade. His older brother with an IQ of 128 in the 5th grade didn't care about grades and passing. His younger brother almost graduated high school before him even though they were 3 years apart in age. The oldest son has ADHD. His grandmother was a math teacher and I am a math teacher, but yet that was the subject he failed almost each year and had to go to summer school. He had the same parents and the same environment as his younger brother, but he was lacking the drive that is born in you. I won't go into the differences of the other 4 just to say that the good Lord gifted me with 3 ADHD children when not much was known about it (the oldest is 44). Every child is different and parents must learn not to judge one by the others, just like teachers must not assume that about siblings they teach. A parent can be their to help and try to point them in the right direction with the right work ethics in school, but the bottom line is how much the child cares and wants to achieve. The envolved parent can help the child that sits on the fence and can go on either side, but the ultimate choice is going to be the child's. It is the same with church. You can take the child to church every Sunday, but when they get older it is their decision how to direct their life. I am not saying that a parent shouldn't try every day to give the guidance their children need and deserve, but you can't beat yourself up when things don't go the way you think they should. All a parent can do is standby their child and give them all the love they can and to know that sometimes that is not enough for the child."
    • Josh Flores
       
      My Reply to Lynn Jones: 1. Parents should be held accountable along with teachers and the students themselves. 2. Six kids????? You are a saint! I plan on having two at the most and pray to the gods they're not girls! 3. Is there a specific reason you sent me your family history?
    • Josh Flores
       
      From Lynn: "I sent you the history to show that no two children are alike and not to judge one child by the behavior of another. In education we teach all types and there is no one way to approach all children. Sometimes it is not the parent that can make a difference, but someone else and not always a teacher."
    • Josh Flores
       
      I don't think the article is about differentiation but sure, I'm confident it's in the back of any high quality educator's mind. Regardless, we can always do more than standby our kids. 
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    How many children do you have? I am an educator and I have 6 children who are all different. My second child, a son, was never told to study, never had a spelling word called out to him, and strieved to make all A's and B's since the 2nd grade. His older brother with an IQ of 128 in the 5th grade didn't care about grades and passing. His younger brother almost graduated high school before him even though they were 3 years apart in age. The oldest son has ADHD. His grandmother was a math teacher and I am a math teacher, but yet that was the subject he failed almost each year and had to go to summer school. He had the same parents and the same environment as his younger brother, but he was lacking the drive that is born in you. I won't go into the differences of the other 4 just to say that the good Lord gifted me with 3 ADHD children when not much was known about it (the oldest is 44). Every child is different and parents must learn not to judge one by the others, just like teachers must not assume that about siblings they teach. A parent can be their to help and try to point them in the right direction with the right work ethics in school, but the bottom line is how much the child cares and wants to achieve. The envolved parent can help the child that sits on the fence and can go on either side, but the ultimate choice is going to be the child's. It is the same with church. You can take the child to church every Sunday, but when they get older it is their decision how to direct their life. I am not saying that a parent shouldn't try every day to give the guidance their children need and deserve, but you can't beat yourself up when things don't go the way you think they should. All a parent can do is standby their child and give them all the love they can and to know that sometimes that is not enough for the child.
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    I sent you the history to show that no two children are alike and not to judge one child by the behavior of another. In education we teach all types and there is no one way to approach all children. Sometimes it is not the parent that can make a difference, but someone else and not always a teacher.
Jackie Smith

The Essence of Leadership | Simple Truths - 47 views

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    Aim for the Heart, they don't care how much you know until they know how much you care.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Second Life®: A New Strategy in Educating Nursing Students - 7 views

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    Abstract The purpose of this article is to discuss how the University of Michigan School of Nursing designed and implemented a virtual hospital unit in Second Life® to run virtual simulations. Three scenarios were developed about topics that represent areas that contribute to patient safety, as well as key student learning challenges. Fifteen students completed a 6-question survey evaluating their experience. Comments indicated students did identify the potential benefits of the Second Life® simulation. The Second Life® platform may also provide avenues for learning in the clinical arena for a multitude of health care professionals. The opportunity to simulate emergent, complex situations in a nonthreatening, safe environment allows all members of the team to develop critical communication skills necessary to provide safe patient care.
Josephine Dorado

Football vs Math (It's The How) - YouTube - 44 views

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    Football vs Math: This is a video about a core concept in 21st century education- students don't care about what they learn, but they do care how they learn. This is unscripted and the students in this video were not coached in any way.
Brenda Howard

The YouToons Get Ready for Obamacare - YouTube - 11 views

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    The 2013 updated Health Care Reform video by the Kaiser Family Foundation
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    The 2013 updated Health Care Reform video by the Kaiser Family Foundation
Martin Burrett

A focus on wellbeing by @Exe_Head - 12 views

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    We are a happy and stable staff, and my colleagues are a fabulous group of people who look after each other and genuinely care about one another. We have an experienced leadership team, and always aim to take account of how people are feeling and the pressure they are under when trying  new approaches and changes to practice. Even so, it has become more and more clear that workload is becoming untenable and wellbeing is suffering a result. I feel that we have felt obligated at times to put policies in place that seem to be there to collect evidence for Ofsted rather than solely to improve the learning of the children in our care. We want to change this.
Cammy Torgenrud

Tech Learning TL Advisor Blog and Ed Tech Ticker Blogs from TL Blog Staff - TechLearning.com - 41 views

  • Email writingFacebook updates and commentsTweeting and replying Discussion Boards - Replying and initiating topicsCommenting on blogsWriting a guest post on a blogCommenting in newspapers or magazines about subjects of interestWriting an article for a newspaper or magazine about a subject of interestWriting to persuade someone / some place to do something you want them to doWriting to teach others how to do something and knowing how to reach those who care
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    "# Email writing # Facebook updates and comments # Tweeting and replying # Discussion Boards - Replying and initiating topics # Commenting on blogs # Writing a guest post on a blog # Commenting in newspapers or magazines about subjects of interest # Writing an article for a newspaper or magazine about a subject of interest # Writing to persuade someone / some place to do something you want them to do # Writing to teach others how to do something and knowing how to reach those who care"
Roland Gesthuizen

The Risks of Rewards - 54 views

  • Control, whether by threats or bribes, amounts to doing things to children rather than working with them. This ultimately frays relationships
  • The alternative to bribes and threats is to work toward creating a caring community whose members solve problems collaboratively and decide together how they want their classroom to be
  • grades in particular have been found to have a detrimental effect on creative thinking, long-term retention, interest in learning, and preference for challenging tasks
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • good values have to be grown from the inside out. Attempts to short-circuit this process by dangling rewards in front of children are at best ineffective, and at worst counterproductive
  • Children are likely to become enthusiastic, lifelong learners as a result of being provided with an engaging curriculum; a safe, caring community in which to discover and create; and a significant degree of choice about what (and how and why) they are learning
  • Unfortunately, carrots turn out to be no more effective than sticks at helping children to become caring, responsible people or lifelong, self-directed learners
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    "Many educators are acutely aware that punishment and threats are counterproductive. Making children suffer in order to alter their future behavior can often elicit temporary compliance, but this strategy is unlikely to help children become ethical, compassionate decision makers. Punishment, even if referred to euphemistically as "consequences," tends to generate anger, defiance, and a desire for revenge. Moreover, it models the use of power rather than reason and ruptures the important relationship between adult and child."
Steve Ransom

Talentism: My Son Won't Do His Homework - 2 views

  • Every employer I know of (and I would assume that you are no exception Colin) wants engaged employees who are passionate about their jobs. Most employers do not want employees who hate their work but persist through it anyway. It is a fallacy to believe that we are teaching our kids that the heart of innovative capability (and therefore their future job prospects) is best served by doing something you hate for an extended period of time no matter the consequences.
  • But I have to focus on what will get them work, even if that will hurt them, society, the companies that hire them and everyone around them.
  • "Why are you so convinced that my son is going to be an academic or an investment banker?" Because as far as I can tell, those are the only two things that schools prepare kids to be.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • and that the stuff that he loves (art and music and video games) will be a great future for him and the stuff he hates (math and science) is something he will never compete in, never have a chance at.
  • But school doesn’t care, because school does not have the objective of helping my son produce the maximum amount of value in the future that he will probably encounter. School cares about ensuring that he knows how to take tests, follow directions and can do math that he will never have to care about for the rest of his life.
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    Most employers do not want employees who hate their work but persist through it anyway. It is a fallacy to believe that we are teaching our kids that the heart of innovative capability (and therefore their future job prospects) is best served by doing something you hate for an extended period of time no matter the consequences.
Steve Ransom

For Some, School's Out Early for Summer - NYTimes.com - 19 views

  • “All of that is really what’s on parents’ minds,” she said. While many of her friends will not send their children to school on Monday, Ms. Capone’s three children, who range from a kindergartner to a third grader, will be there, even though for the past week “they keep coming home and telling me what movies they watched.” “Honestly, for me, it’s free child care,” she said, “and I can get in one last day at the gym.”
  • “Honestly, for me, it’s free child care,” she said, “and I can get in one last day at the gym.”
    • Steve Ransom
       
      This describes why parent involvement is so critical... and perhaps why they can be so apathetic.
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    The last sentence describes why parent involvement is so critical!!!!
Steven Parker

Does Facebook generation care if privacy is dying? - Opinion - Belfasttelegraph.co.uk - 26 views

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    Excellent opinion piece articulating the implications of the loss of privacy for individuals who put their personal data out into world in particular the surrendering of their sense of offline individuality to being a small part of a larger online community of people whereby their personal identity is reflected in their standing as part of an online network.
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    Excellent opinion piece articulating the implications of the loss of privacy for individuals who put their personal data out into world in particular the surrendering of their sense of offline individuality to being a small part of a larger online community of people whereby their personal identity is reflected in their standing as part of an online network.
Mark Trerotola

The web means the end of forgetting | Around the Web | eSchoolNews.com - 38 views

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    The digital age is facing its first existential crisis: the impossibility of erasing your posted past and moving on. Be careful what you post.
Bill Graziadei, Ph.D. (aka Dr. G)

The DO Lectures | 4th - 8th September 2008 - 0 views

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    TED channelled through Wales. Awesome talks. Great sense. Fun.
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    Held on 4th - 8th September 2008, The DO lectures will be about getting a handful of speakers down here in the hope that they may inspire you to do something. To give you the tools and the desire to change the things you care about.
Ed Webb

The English Teacher's Companion: Of Our Teachings: What Do They Remember? - 0 views

  • What was clear today was that it was our relationship and their appreciation for the importance of ideas and my subject that remained one, two, eight or ten years later.
  • After all these encounters, these smiles, these chats and talks in the cafe, through emails and Twitters, what do I realize, what's the lesson? (Does there always have to be a lesson, Mr. Burke? they whine....). Relationships matter: you to your kids, you to your subject, kids to each other.
  • you can't teach kids if you don't know who they are or what they care about. The lesson is that if you don't know or care about what you teach, they will not remember it, will not value it going forward.
Lee-Anne Patterson

Official Google Blog: Adding search power to public data - 0 views

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    The data we're including in this first launch represents just a small fraction of all the interesting public data available on the web. There are statistics for prices of cookies, CO2 emissions, asthma frequency, high school graduation rates, bakers' salaries, number of wildfires, and the list goes on. Reliable information about these kinds of things exists thanks to the hard work of data collectors gathering countless survey forms, and of careful statisticians estimating meaningful indicators that make hidden patterns of the world visible to the eye. All the data we've used in this first launch are produced and published by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau's Population Division. They did the hard work! We just made the data a bit easier to find and use.
Deb White Groebner

Welcome to Project BudBurst - 41 views

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    Great opportunity for students to contribute to US climate records by tracking phenology of local plant species. Lots of helpful resources for teachers at all grade levels, and appropriate for many areas (not just science). Show students how they can quite easily participate in real, meaningful research that encourages them to care for and observe the environment!
Steve Ransom

Salman Khan, Transformer | Connected Principals - 57 views

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    See comment #1 by Will Richardson. Need to be so careful when glorifying what on the surface may appear transformational, while under the shiny wrapper it is nothing all that new. These new forms of just in time information delivery are great student supports; no more.
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