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Christine Schlitt

Lesson Plans: Name & Word Wall Activities, Building Blocks (Kindergarten, Building Blocks) - 32 views

  • Word Walls and The Name Game Each day we have one person who is our helper and we focus onher name. When everyone has had a turn, we start another round.I find it easiest to go in alphabetical order by first names. I write the students names on sentence strips, using one colorfor boys, and another for girls.First round: We reveal one name each day, beginning with a cheer:?Gimme a B (B), Gimme an i (i), Gimme an l (l), Gimme another l(l), Gimme a y (y). What?s that spell? (Billy). One more time!(Billy). Then I ask if anyone ?notices? anything about Billy?s name andwe look for letters in common with other names, or count lettersand look for other names with the same number of letters. Thenwe take a good look at the student, discussing colors ofclothing, so each child can draw a picture of the helper. Iwrite the helper?s name on the board and encourage everyone totry to write that person?s name and then draw a picture of thehelper. The helper gets to take home the pictures drawn byothers, his is put up on the bulletin board with the name cardI?ve made. 2nd Round: The self-portraits are put into a class book and thename cards are transferred to an alphabet word wall. Each day weread the alphabet and names, then take the helper?s name off tocheer and ?notice? letters about this name and others. We formthe helper?s name in magnetic letters, scramble them up and taketurns putting them in the right order. 3rd Round: When we read the alphabet, we say the sounds inaddition to the letters and names. This time we cheer, writethe letters in the helper?s name on the board and then count howmany of those letters are in the names on the word wall. Thenwe talk about which letter has the most, least, etc. We havealso added another name cheer: ?Bryan, Bryan, that?s his name.It starts with B, it ends with n, hooray, Bryan! We stillscramble the name with magnetic letters. At some point we begin to add sight words to the names on thewall, usually starting with go and we. In December, or after wecome back from Christmas, we take the names off the word walland put them in a pocket chart for the kids to use duringcenters. We continue to add sight words the rest of the year,reading the alphabet, and saying the sounds and words each day. Here are additional name ideas; some I?ve tried, some I haven?t.*Count the syllables.*Write the names like a rainbow.*Name poems from the website Korky?s Kool rhyme machine (http://www.literacyhour.co.uk/learning_activities/rhyme/rhyme.html)*Think of words that begin the same as the name.*Make up tongue twisters.*Fill out an interview sheet.*Mystery person (hangman type game where you draw blanks for theletters and the kids guess letters until they know the name.* Use the letters in the name and look for smaller words. *Cut up name puzzles to keep in a literacy center.*Change the initial consonant and play with the word (Sue, Bue,Lue, etc.).*Another name cheer: No matter what I do or say,My name will always be the same,It starts with_____It ends with ____Now count to 3 and say my name,1,2,3,_______.
    • Christine Schlitt
       
      Name Game Ideas for Kindergarten
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    "Word Walls and The Name Game Each day we have one person who is our helper and we focus on her name. When everyone has had a turn, we start another round. I find it easiest to go in alphabetical order by first names. I write the students names on sentence strips, using one color for boys, and another for girls. First round: We reveal one name each day, beginning with a cheer: ?Gimme a B (B), Gimme an i (i), Gimme an l (l), Gimme another l (l), Gimme a y (y). What?s that spell? (Billy). One more time! (Billy). Then I ask if anyone ?notices? anything about Billy?s name and we look for letters in common with other names, or count letters and look for other names with the same number of letters. Then we take a good look at the student, discussing colors of clothing, so each child can draw a picture of the helper. I write the helper?s name on the board and encourage everyone to try to write that person?s name and then draw a picture of the helper. The helper gets to take home the pictures drawn by others, his is put up on the bulletin board with the name card I?ve made. 2nd Round: The self-portraits are put into a class book and the name cards are transferred to an alphabet word wall. Each day we read the alphabet and names, then take the helper?s name off to cheer and ?notice? letters about this name and others. We form the helper?s name in magnetic letters, scramble them up and take turns putting them in the right order. 3rd Round: When we read the alphabet, we say the sounds in addition to the letters and names. This time we cheer, write the letters in the helper?s name on the board and then count how many of those letters are in the names on the word wall. Then we talk about which letter has the most, least, etc. We"
Jay Swan

Stixy - 2 views

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    Digital bulletin boards. Collaborative. Digital Post-it notes. Great for a digital "parking lot." As the site says: "For Flexible Online Creation Collaboration and Sharing"
Elisabeth Howard

Stixy - 110 views

shared by Elisabeth Howard on 10 Oct 09 - Cached
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    "Think of Stixy as your online bulletin board. Create as many Stixyboards as you like, one for each project. Use Stixy to easily organize and share: * Your family's schedule * Projects at work * An upcoming holiday with your friends * Your photos from your last bike trip * Or share a file or two with a friend Only you set the limitations for how you want to use Stixy."
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    "Think of Stixy as your online bulletin board. Create as many Stixyboards as you like, one for each project. Use Stixy to easily organize and share: * Your family's schedule * Projects at work * An upcoming holiday with your friends * Your photos from your last bike trip * Or share a file or two with a friend Only you set the limitations for how you want to use Stixy."
Steve Ransom

Trends in Bullying and Peer Victimization - 1 views

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    "In this bulletin, we will summarize the trends, from youth sur‐ veys that have tracked bullying specifically, and also those that have tracked closely related phenomena such as school assaults, school thefts, school fighting and school hate speech."
Kalin Wilburn

Wallwisher.com :: Words that stick - 3 views

    • Kalin Wilburn
       
      Wallwisher is a site where you create a "wall" for others to collaboratively post.
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    Add sticky notes to a wall. Great way for students to share websites.
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    Reflection bulletin board that doesn't require registration to add notices to it.
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    An online notice board maker for making announcements, wishing people, keeping notes, and things you can do with Post-Its, and more!
Beth Panitz

BrainPOP Jr. Bulletin Board - 37 views

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    art, writing, lesson ideas, send us your work
Paula Baiamonte

The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education - 2009 | Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day... - 116 views

  • The poll for this list — The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education — 2009 — is located below this post, and closes on February 1, 2010. Please vote for no more than ten of the thirty-two sites listed. Please note that I’ll be listing these sites in my post from my pick from number thirty-two and ending at first place, but the poll is listed in the opposite order.
  • Number twenty: PodOmatic is an extraordinarily easy way to create a podcast. Sign-up and your class has your own channel — all you need is a computer microphone. I’m adding it to The Best Sites To Practice Speaking English.  I’m also adding it to The Best Places Where Students Can Create Online Learning/Teaching Objects For An “Authentic Audience”.
  • PinDax is a new web tool that lets you “pin” virtual “Post It” notes on a virtual bulletin board.  It’s very, very similar to a tool I like a lot called Wallwisher.  It has a lot more “bells and whistles” than Wallwisher.  That additional complexity (and I have to admit, it doesn’t seem that much more complex — it just seems to have a lot more options) doesn’t necessarily make it more attractive for classroom use.
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    What, no Diigo?!
Marc Patton

ProQuest K-12 - Enter to win a free K-12 book from Linworth - 0 views

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    ProQuest is teaming up again this year with Linworth Books to give away professional development books!
Heidi Ames

Web 2.0 That Works - home - 5 views

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    "Diigo -- highlight and comment on student blogs Wikis or Google Sites -- http://wikispaces.com or http://sites.google.com/ Voicethread-- http://voicethread.com - example: http://voicethread.com/?#q.b1240008.i667294 -- create space to display or share student work across classrooms, across school/district, and/or with larger school community Create interactive "Bulletin Boards" that highlight levels of work/performance Interactive work gallery/critiques Gallery of VoiceThread in education projects - http://voicethread.com/about/library/"
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    Twitter Hashtag: #W2TW12 Full Session Description This Classroom Instruction That Works "Cool Tools" session focuses on how we can integrate Web 2.0 tools with research-based effective instructional practices identified by Marzano's meta-research. Come explore tools that support effective instruction while making learning fun and engaging for all students.
Roland Gesthuizen

What Does It Mean to Be a Connected Educator? | Edutopia - 48 views

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    "For many of us, becoming a connected educator transformed our lives. Suddenly, we had access to networks of experts and peers invested in improving education practices and willing to share their favorite tools, resources, and strategies. .. So share with us: Tell us your stories about being a connected educator. What has it meant for you? How has it transformed student learning in your classroom? What tools and resources do you rely on most?"
Kenuvis Romero

Dangerous: an in-depth investigation into the life of John McAfee (Wired UK) - 0 views

shared by Kenuvis Romero on 23 Jun 13 - No Cached
  •  His business plan: create an antivirus program and give it away on bulletin boards. McAfee didn't expect users to pay. His real aim was to get them to think the software was so necessary that they would install it on their computers at work. They did. Within five years, half of the Fortune 100 companies were running it, and they felt compelled to pay a licence fee. By 1990, McAfee was making $5 million (£3.2 million) a year with few overheads and little investment.
  • His success was due in part to his ability to spread his own paranoia, the fear that there was always somebody about to attack.
Martin Burrett

UKEdChat/ICTmagic Edu Resources - 50 views

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    14 open access resources to download or find online.
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