Skip to main content

Home/ Diigo In Education/ Group items matching "Stuarts" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Dallas McPheeters

John Stuart Mill: On Instruction, Intellectual Development, and Disciplined Learning - 70 views

  • A pupil from whom nothing is ever demanded which he cannot do, never does all he can. ~ John Stuart Mill
  •  
    A pupil from whom nothing is ever demanded which he cannot do, never does all he can. ~ John Stuart Mill
Chai Reddy

Michael Sigman: When Everyone Gets a Trophy, No One Wins - 61 views

  • "A" grades, which once conveyed excellence, are now given to 43 percent of all college students, according to a study by grade-inflation gurus Stuart Rojstaczer and Christopher Healy.
  • a scandalous 86 percent of private school students, it turns out, get nothing lower than a "B."
  • the vast majority of all private school children are virtually guaranteed to be above average.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Grade inflation promotes ego inflation, the opposite of healthy self-confidence. "We want to encourage effort, especially among young kids," says Jean M. Twenge, author of The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement. "But the 'everybody gets a trophy' mentality basically says that you're going to get rewarded just for showing up. That won't build true self-esteem; instead, it builds this empty sense of 'I'm just fantastic, not because I did anything but just because I'm here.'"
Andrew McCluskey

What Should We Be Worried About In 2013? : 13.7: Cosmos And Culture : NPR - 48 views

  •  
    "Every year Edge.org poses an Annual Question to dozens of scholars, scientists, writers, artists and thinkers. The respondents this year include the reasonably famous, such as Arianna Huffington, Steven Pinker, Brian Eno, Daniel Dennet, Sam Harris and 13.7's own Stuart Kauffman, as well as the not so famous (like me). "The 2013 question is: "What should we be worried about?" Respondents were urged to raise worries that aren't already on the public radar, or to dispel those that are" (Lombardo, NPR)
Martin Burrett

BBC History - Games - Gunpowder Plot Game - 31 views

  •  
    A useful interactive history quiz from the BBC about the Gunpowder Plot of 1605. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/History
Martin Burrett

Primary School History - 2 views

  •  
    Someone has put a lot of love into this great history site. Find child-friendly content about the Tutors, Anglo-saxon, Romans, Victorians and many more. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/History
Kris Cody

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American - 103 views

  • prevented them from zooming out to see a neighborhood, state or country
    • Monica Williams-Mitchell
       
      This explains, in real terms, why I've had so much struggle with online reading! Very interesting article.
  • Because of these preferences—and because getting away from multipurpose screens improves concentration—people consistently say that when they really want to dive into a text, they read it on paper
    • Kris Cody
       
      This is backed up by a recent article: Faris, Michael J., and Stuart A. Selber. "E-Book Issues In Composition: A Partial Assessment And Perspective For Teachers." Composition Forum 24.(2011): ERIC. Web. 31 Mar. 2013.
  • Surveys and consumer reports also suggest that the sensory experiences typically associated with reading—especially tactile experiences—matter to people more than one might assume.
  • ...14 more annotations...
  • When reading a paper book, one can feel the paper and ink and smooth or fold a page with one's fingers; the pages make a distinctive sound when turned; and underlining or highlighting a sentence with ink permanently alters the paper's chemistry.
  • discernible size, shape and weight.
  • Although many old and recent studies conclude that people understand what they read on paper more thoroughly than what they read on screens, the differences are often small. Some experiments, however, suggest that researchers should look not just at immediate reading comprehension, but also at long-term memory.
  • When taking the quiz, volunteers who had read study material on a monitor relied much more on remembering than on knowing, whereas students who read on paper depended equally on remembering and knowing.
  • E-ink is easy on the eyes because it reflects ambient light just like a paper book, but computer screens, smartphones and tablets like the iPad shine light directly into people's faces.
  • the American Optometric Association officially recognizes computer vision syndrome.
  • People who took the test on a computer scored lower and reported higher levels of stress and tiredness than people who completed it on paper.
  • Although people in both groups performed equally well on the READ test, those who had to scroll through the continuous text did not do as well on the attention and working-memory tests.
  • Subconsciously, many people may think of reading on a computer or tablet as a less serious affair than reading on paper. Based on a detailed 2005 survey of 113 people in northern California, Ziming Liu of San Jose State University concluded that people reading on screens take a lot of shortcuts—they spend more time browsing, scanning and hunting for keywords compared with people reading on paper, and are more likely to read a document once, and only once.
  • When reading on screens, people seem less inclined to engage in what psychologists call metacognitive learning regulation—strategies such as setting specific goals, rereading difficult sections and checking how much one has understood along the way
  • Perhaps she and her peers will grow up without the subtle bias against screens that seems to lurk in the minds of older generations.
  • They think of using an e-book, not owning an e-book,"
  • Participants in her studies say that when they really like an electronic book, they go out and get the paper version.
  • When it comes to intensively reading long pieces of plain text, paper and ink may still have the advantage. But text is not the only way to read.
  •  
    it is difficult to see any one passage in the context of the entire text.
  •  
    it is difficult to see any one passage in the context of the entire text.
1 - 6 of 6
Showing 20 items per page