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Kim Vivaldi

NIH resource information - 16 views

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    Broad resource for answer to basic family life education from National Instiuted of Healrh (NIH)
anonymous

Exploring Bioethics - 49 views

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    Free materials on bioethics and link to request other NIH Curriculum Supplements
Megan N-B

Health Information | National Institutes of Health (NIH) - 1 views

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    Finding valid and reliable health information
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    Finding valid and reliable health information
Holly Barlaam

Findings Magazine - 58 views

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    Findings--magazine published by National Institutes of Health. Focus is on how science improves health. Many school resources here.
Holly Barlaam

SNPs: VARIATIONS ON A THEME - 18 views

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    Basic information about SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), how they are found, how they are used in disease diagnosis and drug development, etc
Peter Beens

Raising the Ritalin Generation - NYTimes.com - 2 views

  • teachers fill out short behavior questionnaires, called Conners rating scales, which assess things like “squirminess” on a scale of one to five. In many cases, I discovered, diagnoses hinge on the teachers’ responses.
  • the formidable list of possible side effects included difficulty sleeping, dizziness, vomiting, loss of appetite, diarrhea, headache, numbness, irregular heartbeat, difficulty breathing, fever, hives, seizures, agitation, motor or verbal tics and depression. It can slow a child’s growth or weight gain. Most disturbing, it can cause sudden death, especially in children with heart defects or serious heart problems.
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    "I REMEMBER the moment my son's teacher told us, "Just a little medication could really turn things around for Will." We stared at her as if she were speaking Greek. "Are you talking about Ritalin?" my husband asked."...
NTHS Library

Drug Information Portal - 15 views

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    U.S. National Library of Medicine - Access to over 12,000 drugs
Jon Tanner

NIMH · Helping Children and Adolescents Cope with Violence and Disasters: What Parents Can Do - 68 views

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    Free booklet (online, PDF, or hardcopy) in English and Spanish with helpful information for parents to help children cope with violence and disasters.
Megan N-B

Food Allergy: MedlinePlus - 0 views

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    Copied from tag search
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    Copied from tag search
Megan N-B

MEDLINE, PubMed, and PMC (PubMed Central): How are they different? - 0 views

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    Found via Diigo tag search
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    Found via Diigo tag search
P Furline

Deafness and Communication Disorders - 26 views

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    National Institute on Health Issues
Clint Heitz

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens - Scientific American - 25 views

  • The matter is by no means settled. Before 1992 most studies concluded that people read slower, less accurately and less comprehensively on screens than on paper. Studies published since the early 1990s, however, have produced more inconsistent results: a slight majority has confirmed earlier conclusions, but almost as many have found few significant differences in reading speed or comprehension between paper and screens. And recent surveys suggest that although most people still prefer paper—especially when reading intensively—attitudes are changing as tablets and e-reading technology improve and reading digital books for facts and fun becomes more common.
  • Compared with paper, screens may also drain more of our mental resources while we are reading and make it a little harder to remember what we read when we are done. A parallel line of research focuses on people's attitudes toward different kinds of media. Whether they realize it or not, many people approach computers and tablets with a state of mind less conducive to learning than the one they bring to paper.
  • Both anecdotally and in published studies, people report that when trying to locate a particular piece of written information they often remember where in the text it appeared. We might recall that we passed the red farmhouse near the start of the trail before we started climbing uphill through the forest; in a similar way, we remember that we read about Mr. Darcy rebuffing Elizabeth Bennett on the bottom of the left-hand page in one of the earlier chapters.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • At least a few studies suggest that by limiting the way people navigate texts, screens impair comprehension.
  • Because of their easy navigability, paper books and documents may be better suited to absorption in a text. "The ease with which you can find out the beginning, end and everything inbetween and the constant connection to your path, your progress in the text, might be some way of making it less taxing cognitively, so you have more free capacity for comprehension," Mangen says.
  • An e-reader always weighs the same, regardless of whether you are reading Proust's magnum opus or one of Hemingway's short stories. Some researchers have found that these discrepancies create enough "haptic dissonance" to dissuade some people from using e-readers. People expect books to look, feel and even smell a certain way; when they do not, reading sometimes becomes less enjoyable or even unpleasant. For others, the convenience of a slim portable e-reader outweighs any attachment they might have to the feel of paper books.
  • In one of his experiments 72 volunteers completed the Higher Education Entrance Examination READ test—a 30-minute, Swedish-language reading-comprehension exam consisting of multiple-choice questions about five texts averaging 1,000 words each. People who took the test on a computer scored lower and reported higher levels of stress and tiredness than people who completed it on paper.
  • Perhaps, then, any discrepancies in reading comprehension between paper and screens will shrink as people's attitudes continue to change. The star of "A Magazine Is an iPad That Does Not Work" is three-and-a-half years old today and no longer interacts with paper magazines as though they were touchscreens, her father says. Perhaps she and her peers will grow up without the subtle bias against screens that seems to lurk in the minds of older generations. In current research for Microsoft, Sellen has learned that many people do not feel much ownership of e-books because of their impermanence and intangibility: "They think of using an e-book, not owning an e-book," she says. Participants in her studies say that when they really like an electronic book, they go out and get the paper version. This reminds Sellen of people's early opinions of digital music, which she has also studied. Despite initial resistance, people love curating, organizing and sharing digital music today. Attitudes toward e-books may transition in a similar way, especially if e-readers and tablets allow more sharing and social interaction than they currently do.
meghankelly492

Self Representations and Music Performance Anxiety: A Study With Professional and Amateur Musicians - 0 views

  • The present research focused on the relationship between self-representations and anxiety among a sample of Italian professional and amateur musicians.
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