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Lisa C. Hurst

Inside the School Silicon Valley Thinks Will Save Education | WIRED - 9 views

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    "AUTHOR: ISSIE LAPOWSKY. ISSIE LAPOWSKY DATE OF PUBLICATION: 05.04.15. 05.04.15 TIME OF PUBLICATION: 7:00 AM. 7:00 AM INSIDE THE SCHOOL SILICON VALLEY THINKS WILL SAVE EDUCATION Click to Open Overlay Gallery Students in the youngest class at the Fort Mason AltSchool help their teacher, Jennifer Aguilar, compile a list of what they know and what they want to know about butterflies. CHRISTIE HEMM KLOK/WIRED SO YOU'RE A parent, thinking about sending your 7-year-old to this rogue startup of a school you heard about from your friend's neighbor's sister. It's prospective parent information day, and you make the trek to San Francisco's South of Market neighborhood. You walk up to the second floor of the school, file into a glass-walled conference room overlooking a classroom, and take a seat alongside dozens of other parents who, like you, feel that public schools-with their endless bubble-filled tests, 38-kid classrooms, and antiquated approach to learning-just aren't cutting it. At the same time, you're thinking: this school is kind of weird. On one side of the glass is a cheery little scene, with two teachers leading two different middle school lessons on opposite ends of the room. But on the other side is something altogether unusual: an airy and open office with vaulted ceilings, sunlight streaming onto low-slung couches, and rows of hoodie-wearing employees typing away on their computers while munching on free snacks from the kitchen. And while you can't quite be sure, you think that might be a robot on wheels roaming about. Then there's the guy who's standing at the front of the conference room, the school's founder. Dressed in the San Francisco standard issue t-shirt and jeans, he's unlike any school administrator you've ever met. But the more he talks about how this school uses technology to enhance and individualize education, the more you start to like what he has to say. And so, if you are truly fed up with the school stat
Michele Brown

United Classrooms | Where Your Class Meets The World - 9 views

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    United Classrooms is a FREE platform that connects Classrooms around the world. When a teacher signs their class up, students can log in to a secure Classroom profile page where they can share content with their own teachers, classmates and parents AS WELL AS collaborate with other Classrooms across the globe. It unites students from diverse backgrounds in the creation of a safe and dynamic global community where knowledge, experience and relationship are shared beyond the Classroom walls.
Karen Polstra

Classroom 2.0 - 62 views

    • Justin Shorb
       
      How many members of the Diigo Ed group are using this forum? I don't want to be overwhelmed by too many social networking groups that I become inundated with too much information to be a truly participating member of any of them. I like the Diigo Ed group, so far!
    • Monika King
       
      I enjoy reading the items in the Forum, but I have yet to contribute.
    • Meredith Johnson
       
      I find the two forums match very well for what my interests are in education.
    • Deb White Groebner
       
      While I am new to the Diigo Ed group (and like it so far), I joined CR 2.0 a year and a half ago and have thoroughly enjoyed the conversations, info, and (especially) the webinars! Lots of good sharing all around.
    • Antwon Lincoln
       
      Just a wonderful resource for all who are in to connecting classrooms with technology!
    • Phil Taylor
       
      I also belong to Diigo in Education as well as four of EDTech type groups, as well as one that I have created for my school.
    • Gerald Carey
       
      I also can see different uses for these two forums.
    • Susan Wanke
       
      I've been using Diigo and the group Diigo in Education for quite some time, but Classroom 2.0 is active with tons of ideas for all of us.
  • social network for those interested in Web 2.0 and Social Media in education
  • Classroom 2.0 is a free, community-supported network. We especially hope that those who are "beginners" will find this a supportive comfortable place to start being part of the digital dialog. Because of spammers, we have to approve all memberships here. While your membership is pending you are still welcome to peruse the site or attend any events!
    • Molly Hinkle
       
      I'm wondering how the value of this will balance with the time required to do it right!
    • Karen Polstra
       
      Me too.  I just joined.  We will see.
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    Online social networking at its best. This Ning page is centered around using online resources in today's classrooms. Excellent group!
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    The community for educators using Web 2.0 and collaborative technologies!
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    I've been using it the last 3 weeks. There is a large group of educators there and usefull shared information.
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    I just joined the Classroom 2.0 ning about a week ago. It appears to have some valuable information. I am new to social networking, but am looking forward to the experience. I am very interested in Web 2.0 technologies so the ning seemed like a good place to start.
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    This is an interesting website with a great collection of tools for use in e-learning, blended classrooms and traditional teaching.
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    This is an interesting website with a great collection of tools for use in e-learning, blended classrooms and traditional teaching.
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    web 2,  classroom practice
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    This is an interesting website with a great collection of tools for use in e-learning, blended classrooms and traditional teaching.
Wayne Holly

Should You Flip Your Classroom? | Edutopia - 207 views

  • different forms of instructional video published online for students
  • primarily by Salman Khan's TED talk
  • obtaining core content prior to coming to class
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  • classroom space was then used for critical thinking and group problem solving.
  • spend more time in the classroom focused on collaboration and higher-order thinking
  • lecture is still a poor mode of information transfer
  • Eric Mazur's talk Confessions of a Converted Lecturer
  • hype
  • Good teaching, regardless of discipline, should always limit passive transfer of knowledge in class, and promote learning environments built on the tenants of inquiry, collaboration and critical thinking
  • pedagogical skills
  • The science teacher in me is deeply committed to the process of inquiry, and arming my students with the skills needed to construct and test their own ideas. The AP teacher in me fears sending my students off to their examination in May having covered only a portion of all the content required
  • inquiry learning cycle.
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    I like this concept - read more. Works against teacher as delivery system to be ignored.
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    At its core, "flipped instruction" refers to moving aspects of teaching out of the classroom and into the homework space. With the advent of new technologies, specifically the ability to record digitally annotated and narrated screencasts, instructional videos have become a common medium in the flipped classroom. Although not limited to videos, a flipped classroom most often harnesses different forms of instructional video published online for students.
massicg

Vote: Is technology a boon or burden in the classroom? - The Globe and Mail - 62 views

  • Back to article Apple vows iBooks 2 will ‘reinvent’ school textbooks Enlarge this image Vote: Is technology a boon or burden in the classroom? Published Monday, Nov. 28, 2011 12:00AM EST Last updated Monday, Nov. 28, 2011 2:29PM EST
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    Globe and Mail visual graph: Is technology a boon or burden in the classroom? As the world becomes increasingly digital, school boards are trying to negotiate technology's role in the classroom. Some have embraced digital tools, enhancing their classrooms with Smartboards, cell phones and social media. Others have favoured tradition, claiming technology is a distraction and a nuisance. Where do Globe readers stand? Each dot on this graph represents one person's response colour-coded by age group.
Rachael Hodges

Five Best Practices for the Flipped Classroom | Edutopia - 186 views

  • It doesn't solve anything. It is a great first step in reframing the role of the teacher in the classroom. It fosters the "guide on the side" mentality and role, rather than that of the "sage of the stage." It helps move a classroom culture towards student construction of knowledge rather than the teacher having to tell the knowledge to students.
  • We must first focus on creating the engagement and then look at structures, like the flipped classroom, that can support.
  • If the flipped classroom is truly to become innovative, then it must be paired with transparent and/or embedded reason to know the content.
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  • One of the best way to create the "need to know" is to use a pedagogical model that demands this.
  • Will you demand that all students watch the video, or is it a way to differentiate and allow choice
  • Will you allow or rely on mobile learning for students to watch it?
  • Lack of technology doesn't necessarily close the door to the flipped classroom model, but it might require some intentional planning and differentiation.
  • you must build in reflective activities to have students think about what they learned, how it will help them, its relevance
  • Students need metacognition to connect content to objectives
  • The focus should be on teacher practice, then tools and structures.
  • Ok, I'll be honest. I get very nervous when I hear education reformists and politicians tout how "incredible" the flipped classroom model (1), or how it will "solve" many of the problems of education. It doesn't solve anything. It is a
Serene Pleasant

Five-Minute Film Festival: Flipped Classrooms | Edutopia - 78 views

    • Serene Pleasant
       
      Mary Beth Hertz's excellent blog: differentiating instruction with video in the flipped classroom
    • Serene Pleasant
       
      Mary Beth Hertz's  blog:"The Flipped Classroom". . . video use to differentiate in the Classroom
  • Mary Beth Hertz's excellent blog published earlier this week, "The Flipped Classroom: Pro and Con" (1) -- one of the most concise and balanced views I've read on the buzz-wordy concept of flipping the Classroom. Advocates say that "flipped Classrooms"
Marc Safran

Flat Classroom Project - 1 views

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    The Flat Classroom Project is a global collaborative project that joins together middle and senior high school students. The Project uses Web 2.0 tools to make communication and interaction between students and teachers from all participating Classrooms easier. The topics studied and discussed are real-world scenarios based on 'The World is Flat' by Thomas Friedman. One of the main goals of the project is to 'flatten' or lower the Classroom walls so that instead of each class working isolated and alone, 2 or more classes are joined virtually to become one large Classroom. This is done through the Internet using Web 2.0 tools such as Wikispaces and Ning.
Karen Balnis

Another Look at the Weaknesses of Online Learning - Innovations - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 86 views

shared by Karen Balnis on 28 Jul 11 - No Cached
  • have been lucky enough to have taught the full range of our freshman / sophmore undergraduate offerings as both an onsite and online instructor. While I have thoroughly enjoyed both formats - and very much so - I must admit that my experiences online have been *much* more positive than onsite instruction. Let me try and elucidate:1. While in the onsite classroom you have the opportunity to think on your feet and challenge and be experiential on your feet to reactions to the students who speak, in the online classroom, you are able to meet *every* class member and challenge their minds and ideas. The students who would normally be lost in a classroom of 35-40 are met and developed each day or week at their level and pushed to consider ideas they might not have considered. 2. I am able to reach the entire class through multimedia exhibits in each of the weekly units - journal articles, non-copyrighted film clips (and many from our university's purchased collection under an agreement for both onsite classroom and online classroom use), photography, art, patents, etc, that the students would not see - or would otherwise ignore - in an onsite classroom. We incorporate this information into our discussions and make it part of the larger whole of history.3. Each student and I - on the phone during office hours or in e-mail - discuss the creation of their term papers - and discuss midterm and final "anxiety" issues - and as they are used to the online format, and regular communication with me through the discussion boards, they respond much more readily than onsite students, whom I have found I have to pressure to talk to me. 4. I am able to accommodate students from around the country - and around the world. I have had enrolled in my class students from Japan, Indonesia, India, England - and many other countries. As a result, I have set up a *very* specific Skype address *only* for use of my students. They are required to set up the time and day with me ahead of time and I need to approve that request, but for them (and for some of my students scattered all over the state and US), the face time is invaluable in helping them feel "connected" - and I am more than happy to offer it. 5. As the software upgrades, the possibilities of what I can offer become more and more amazing, and the ease of use for both me - and for the students -  becomes astronomically better. Many have never known the software, so they don't notice it - but those who have taken online courses before cheer it on. Software does not achieve backwards. As very few of these issues are met by the onsite classroom, I am leaning more and more toward the online classroom as the better mode of instruction. Yes, there are times I *really* miss the onsite opportunities, but then I think of the above distinctions and realize that yes, I am where I should be, and virtually *ALL* the students are getting far more for their money than they would get in an onsite classroom. This is the wave of the future, and it holds such amazing promise. Already I think we are seeing clear and fruitful results, and if academics receive effective - and continuing - instruction and support from the very beginning, I cannot imagine why one would ever go back. The only reason I can think of *not* doing this is if the instructor has his or her *own* fear of computers. Beyond that - please, please jump on the bandwagon, swallow your fears, and learn how to do this with vigor. I don't think you will ever be sorry.PhD2BinUS
  • have been lucky enough to have taught the full range of our freshman / sophmore undergraduate offerings as both an onsite and online instructor. While I have thoroughly enjoyed both formats - and very much so - I must admit that my experiences online have been *much* more positive than onsite instruction. Let me try and elucidate:
  • While I have thoroughly enjoyed both formats - and very much so - I must admit that my experiences online have been *much* more positive than onsite instruction. Let me try and elucidate:
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    I am a graduate student at Sam Houston State University and before I started grad school I never had taken an online course before. My opinion then was that online courses were a joke and you couldn't learn from taking a course online. Now my opinion has done a complete 180. The teachers post numerous youtube videos and other helpful tools for each assignment so that anyone can successfully complete the assignment no matter what their technology skill level is. I do not see much difference between online and face-to-face now because of the way the instructors teach the courses.
Peter Beens

What to "Look-For" in Classroom Walkthroughs > Eye On Education - 2 views

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    What are Classroom Walkthroughs? Classroom walkthroughs have been a standard practice for school administrators and other instructional leaders to improve their school for years. The common elements of a Classroom walkthrough are as follows...
Nancy White

Google's Classroom: A Sneak Peek | Burlington High School Help Desk - 85 views

  • it is device agnostic
  • t Classroom converts a ten step (or more) workflow down to one simple step. She made several references to Classroom eliminating many stressors for teachers, especially those who may not be “Google savvy.”
  • Teachers will have the ability to create multiple, if not unlimited, classes in Classroom. Heidi and Paul explained the process is intuitive and within ten minutes students were in Classroom and were able to start using it.
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  • The discussion feature is called the “stream” and Paul said it resembles Google Plus.
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    Details on Google Classroom from a teacher who tested it in 2013-14.
Jim Daly

Using Technology as Our Teacher - US News and World Report - 0 views

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    But how can we identify a potentially good teacher? How can average teachers become better teachers? The secretary's special funding could make a crucial difference by financing a national program exploiting the electronic miracles of the Internet and video. We could escape geography by using the technology to have the best teachers appear in hundreds of thousands of disparate classrooms. This is a force multiplier. The classrooms would be equipped with a large, flat-screen monitor with whiteboards on either side; the monitor would be connected to a school server that contains virtually all of the lessons for every subject taught in the school, from kindergarten through 12th grade. The contents would use animation, video, dramatization, and presentation options to deliver complete lessons, to convey ideas in unique ways that are now unavailable in conventional classrooms. The classroom teachers would play the role of enhancers, answering questions and helping students better understand the material covered electronically; they'd pause the presentation to ask questions and to prompt critical thinking. The whiteboard would be the platform for student involvement.
Jason Finley

Articles | What Makes Them Click - 79 views

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    What if we applied the psychology of what makes technology attractive to students...to our practices in the classroom? Using this idea, in addition to using more technology in the classroom, why not design the traditional human / face-to-face classroom experience to be more like what makes technology so engrossing to modern students? Do these principles sound familiar... Deliver information in bite sized chunks, Create mental models, Use short stories to help process information, Learning happens and is remembered through repetition, People are motivated by Progress and Mastery, Sustained attention lasts 10 minutes, and the use of Progressive Disclosure. Here are 100 little articles that could have big implications in the classroom.
Wolverhampton CLC

How to create a free classroom website - 69 views

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    Having a classroom website can benefit everyone involved including the students, the teacher, and the parents. classroom websites are great places to post news, pictures, homework instructions and teaching resources. This guide explains how to create a free classroom blog or website using weebly.com
Sharin Tebo

4 Steps to Empower Student Voice | The Remind Blog - 39 views

  • The term “student voice” refers to the input and perspectives of students, and describes how their voices and actions affect what happens in the classroom. Through developing their own questions, seeking out their interests, and driving their own learning, students become more involved in their education. With this involvement comes empowerment, as students are able to use their knowledge to contribute to the greater community.
  • 1. Inclusion When students feel that they matter and are included in the classroom community, they are much more likely to open up and share their perspectives.
  • 2. Integration Begin to integrate student voice into your daily lessons by creating more opportunities for students to contribute. This can come in the form of whole classroom discussion, small group activities, input on writing activities, and more
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • At the transformational level, teachers can draw on student input to shape curricular goals for the class.
  • Student empowerment enables students to use their knowledge to contribute to the classroom and greater outside community. When students feel comfortable sharing their voices, they grow into positions of leadership.
  • Resources Encourage student voice in your classroom and school community with some of these helpful resources: Student Voice: Student Voice has toolkit filled with classroom resources, student voice stories, and more that will allow you to transform your classroom into one where students can thrive. Edutopia: Check out some of these great articles and resources for highlighting student voice in your classroom. Students at the Center: Motivation, engagement, and student voice activities. MindShift KQED: From student voices, learn what students say about being trusted partners in learning.
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    Voice and Choice--Encouraging it in 4 steps to personalize the learning experience.
Misha Miller

Using Groups Effectively: 10 Principles » Edurati Review - 50 views

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    "Conversation is key . Sawyer succinctly explains this principle: "Conversation leads to flow, and flow leads to creativity." When having students work in groups, consider what will spark rich conversation. The original researcher on flow, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, found that rich conversation precedes and ignites flow more than any other activity.1 Tasks that require (or force) interaction lead to richer collaborative conceptualization. Set a clear but open-ended goal . Groups produce the richest ideas when they have a goal that will focus their interaction but also has fluid enough boundaries to allow for creativity. This is a challenge we often overlook. As teachers, we often have an idea of what a group's final product should look like (or sound like, or…). If we put students into groups to produce a predetermined outcome, we prevent creative thinking from finding an entry point. Try not announcing time limits. As teachers we often use a time limit as a "motivator" that we hope will keep group work focused. In reality, this may be a major detractor from quality group work. Deadlines, according to Sawyer, tend to impede flow and produce lower quality results. Groups produce their best work in low-pressure situations. Without a need to "keep one eye on the clock," the group's focus can be fully given to the task. Do not appoint a group "leader." In research studies, supervisors, or group leaders, tend to subvert flow unless they participate as an equal, listening and allowing the group's thoughts and decisions to guide the interaction. Keep it small. Groups with the minimum number of members that are needed to accomplish a task are more efficient and effective. Consider weaving together individual and group work. For additive tasks-tasks in whicha group is expectedtoproduce a list, adding one idea to another-research suggests that better results develop
Randolph Hollingsworth

Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning - School Improvement Reform Report on Pedagogy - 14 views

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    Stupski Fndtn staff + McREL researchers ask 2 questions: (1) How can teachers adapt the principles of effective pedagogy to differentiate instruction and meet the needs of all learners in order to help Our Kids be challened, motivated, and successful? (2) How can teachers create structured, challenging, yet nurturing classroom environments to ensure that Our Kids are engaged and successful learners? KEY FINDINGS: adaptive and differentiated instruction (theory and methodologies) in culturally relevant classroom that allows for student "role fluidity" + teacher skill in finding gaps in knowledge/skills + motivating students through engaging projects and targeted instruction (academically rigorous and nurturing) PLUS fac devt must be supported by and inclusive of school leadership. a Design Collaborative might act on 5 options: (1) Support teachers to better utilize methods and theories of culturally relevant pedagogy and differentiated instruction, (2) Implement a pedagogical program based on the notion of "role fluidity" to give students a central voice in the classroom, (3) Use technology to engage students and enhance pedagogy, (4) Guide teachers in creating academically rigorous and positive classroom learning environments, (5) Implement pedagogical programs based on developing higher order thinking and subject-specific skills. Report by Kerry Englert, Helen Apthorp, Matthew Seebaum. Dated Oct 2009
Shannon Smith

Need resources to assist in creating a 21st century learner training/ professional deve... - 131 views

Thank you! This is great information! James McKee wrote: > Shannon, > > I was recently referred to this video of Michael Wesch who teaches cultural anthropology at Kansas State University. He ...

professional development 21st century learners technology

Martin Burrett

Classroom Screen - 48 views

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    "A superb online whiteboard suite of tools, including a random name picker, classroom sound level indicator, display a QR code, drawing and text tools, traffic lights, timers, clocks and dates, and even a fab exit poll tool. You can even change the background, including your own images to display extra resource information, or use your computer camera to show live video like a visualiser."
Linda Hoff

Teacher Vodcasting and Flipped Classroom Network - A professional learning community for teachers using vodcasting in the Classroom - 73 views

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    A social network site for teachers using vodcasting in the classroom.
  • ...1 more comment...
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    Anybody know what the Flipped Classroom is? This site is a social network with that as it's theme. Not a lot of information about it though.
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    flipped classroom community
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    A social network for educators to learn and share their experiences with the flipped classroom
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