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Tim Cooper

http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1099&context=jpeer - 32 views

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    Great article on research on the maker movement and learning
Michele Rosen

The Research Process - 77 views

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    Does your research teaching embrace the 21st century learner? This blog post has great information/lessons on strategies for helping students curate (finding/evaluating/managing) information.
Gerald Carey

RefME | Free Reference Generator - Harvard, APA, MLA, Chicago... - 41 views

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    Chrome extension. Could be a game-changer.
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    I use www.citefast.com since it does not require a login.
Roland Gesthuizen

Screen time: It's not about how much. It's about how. | Tech Learning - 37 views

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    "Screen time is most effective when adults and children use electronic devices together. This interaction will prepare young people to effectively use the devices as toddlers, then in school and beyond."
Kelly Sereno

How Teens Do Research in the Digital World | Pew Research Center's Internet & American ... - 104 views

  • Overview

    Three-quarters of AP and NWP teachers say that the internet  and digital search tools have had a “mostly positive” impact on their students’ research habits, but 87% say these technologies are creating an “easily distracted generation with short attention spans” and 64% say today’s digital technologies “do more to distract students than to help them academically.”

  • Overall, the vast majority of these teachers say a top priority in today’s classrooms should be teaching students how to “judge the quality of online information.”
  • The internet and digital technologies are significantly impacting how students conduct research: 77% of these teachers say the overall impact is “mostly positive,” but they sound many cautionary notes
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  • Teachers and students alike report that for today’s students, “research” means “Googling.”  As a result, some teachers report that for their students “doing research” has shifted from a relatively slow process of intellectual curiosity and discovery to a fast-paced, short-term exercise aimed at locating just enough information to complete an assignment.
    • Kelly Sereno
       
      Yikes - a disturbing survey response!
  •   Second and third on the list of frequently used sources are online encyclopedias such as Wikipedia, and social media sites such as YouTube. 
  •  94% of the teachers surveyed say their students are “very likely to use Google or other online search engines in a typical research assignment, placing it well ahead of all other sources that we asked about
      • e databases such as EBSCO, JSTOR, or Grolier (17%)
      • A research librarian at their school or public library (16%)
  • In response to this trend, many teachers say they shape research assignments to address what they feel can be their students’ overdependence on search engines and online encyclopedias.  Nine in ten (90%) direct their students to specific online resources they feel are most appropriate for a particular assignment, and 83% develop research questions or assignments that require students to use a wider variety of sources, both online and offline.
  • Teachers give students’ research skills modest ratings

    Despite viewing the overall impact of today’s digital environment on students’ research habits as “mostly positive,” teachers rate the actual research skills of their students as “good” or “fair” in most cases.  Very few teachers rate their students “excellent” on any of the research skills included in the survey.  This is notable, given that the majority of the sample teaches Advanced Placement courses to the most academically advanced students.

    Figure 1

    • Kelly Sereno
       
      These research skills relate to the common core literacy standards, and many ratings of students' skills in these areas fell into fair or poor categories.
  • Overwhelming majorities of these teachers also agree with the assertions that “today’s digital technologies are creating an easily distracted generation with short attention spans” (87%) and “today’s students are too ‘plugged in’ and need more time away from their digital technologies” (86%).  Two-thirds (64%) agree with the notion that “today’s digital technologies do more to distract students than to help them academically.”
Thieme Hennis

Historypin | Home - 55 views

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    Historypin is a way for millions of people to come together to share glimpses of the past and build up the story of human history.
Don Doehla

Johnson: Language networks: When bigger isn't better | The Economist - 20 views

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    HOW would you rank "important" languages? If asked to rattle them off, many people start with English, but after that are reluctant to go further. Important how, they ask. One approach would be to look at people and money: surely a language is important if it is spoken by lots of people, in countries with great wealth (and presumably, therefore, power).
scotchcornered

Characterising one-to-one conservatoire teaching: Some implications of a quantitative a... - 12 views

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    Quantitative video data of one-to-one
Matt Lindsey

Methods and Materials - PER User's Guide - 11 views

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    Excellent resources for teaching physics
Sharin Tebo

Creative Educator - Connecting Curricula for Deeper Understanding - 31 views

  • Most schools will say that they want students to have an understanding of their world as a whole, but they seldom look at topics with an interdisciplinary focus. Why? It is easy to find reasons why this disjointed approach to learning happens:

    · Some argue that there is so much content and so many skills to be learned
      in each discipline that they don’t have time to integrate subjects.

    · Others say that the each discipline has a body of knowledge and skills that
      should stand on its own and not be muddied by the intrusion of other disciplines.

    · Secondary educators say that there is insufficient common planning time
      to combine their efforts to teach an interdisciplinary course.

    · Still others say that the whole system is geared toward separate subjects
      and to break out of this would require a monumental effort.

    · Others are guided by “the tests,” which are presented by separate disciplines.

  • The ultimate goal for the study of any subject is to develop a deeper understanding of its content and skills so that students can engage in higher-level thinking and higher- level application of its principles. When students dig deeper and understand content across several disciplines, they will be better equipped to engage in substantive discussion and application of the topic. They will also be better able to see relationships across disciplines.
  • They organize students into interdisciplinary teams and coordinate lessons so that what happens in math, science, language arts, and social studies all tie to a common theme. Many times these teachers team-teach during larger blocks of time. Advocates of this more holistic approach to curriculum argue that it helps students:
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  • Of course, digging deeper doesn’t fit well in the time frame that most schools use. It takes time to link content across several disciplines, and it may be difficult to squeeze a learning activity into a 40-minute period. To change the method of learning will mean changing more than the curricula. The school structure, including the schedule and methodology will also need to change.
  • To prepare our students for an integrated world, we need to break out of the separate-discipline mentality and develop more holistic and problem/project-based approaches. Many have tried to do this, and it isn’t easy.
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    STEM and STEAM--challenge to aim for more integration cross-disciplines.
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