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Steve Ransom

The 10 Worst Mistakes of First-Time Job Hunters - Finance and Accounting Jobs News and ... - 44 views

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    Some salient and relevant advice for 21st century learners! "I would have actually networked." "I would have gotten more involved in career-relevant extracurricular activities.""I would have focused more on becoming 'professional.'""I would have kept better track of my achievements.""I would have focused more on developing relevant skills."
Steve Ransom

Our Future, Our Teachers: The Obama Administration's Plan for Teacher Education Reform ... - 102 views

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    Some needed changes here, but rating program effectiveness on K12 student test scores is ludicrous!
Steve Ransom

EDTREK2011 - 52 views

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    Great idea by Bernie Dodge et al.
Steve Ransom

7 in 10 Students Have Skipped Buying a Textbook Because of Its Cost - Students - The Ch... - 22 views

  • "Students recognize that textbooks are essential to their education but have been pushed to the breaking point by skyrocketing costs,"
  • does not measure the academic consequences for students who do not purchase textbooks
  • 78 percent of those students who reported not buying a textbook said they expected to perform worse in that class, even though some borrowed or shared the textbook.
Michaella Thornton

University Business - May 2011 [36] - 0 views

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    Collaboration Station: Designing an effective group study space - whether it's out in the open or behind a closed door - takes a team. By Melissa Ezarik (great article on how design impacts study spaces in higher ed)
Steve Ransom

Revisiting Extra Credit Policies | Faculty Focus - 3 views

  • ere’s how it works. The instructor attaches a blank piece of paper to the back of every exam. Students may write on that sheet any exam questions they couldn’t answer or weren’t sure they answered correctly. Students then take this piece of paper with them and look up the correct answers. They can use any resource at their disposal short of asking the instructor. At the start of the next class session, they turn in their set of corrected answers which the instructor re-attaches to their original exam. Both sets of answers are graded. If students missed the question on the exam but answered it correctly on the attached sheet, half the credit lost for the wrong answer is recovered.
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    The blank paper idea is very interesting. I don't give that many exams of this type, but if I did, I'd seriously consider this strategy.
Steve Ransom

The Games Adults Play | China Power - 31 views

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    Eye-opening perspective on the impact of the numbers game in college rankings and recruitment.
Lindsey Hogan

The Conversation - 46 views

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    Welcome to The Conversation Launched in March 2011, The Conversation is an independent source of information, analysis and commentary from the university and research sector. The site is in development and we welcome your feedback.
D. S. Koelling

A Perfect Storm in Undergraduate Education, Part I - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher E... - 40 views

  • at least 45 percent of undergraduates demonstrated "no improvement in critical thinking, complex reasoning, and writing skills in the first two years of college, and 36 percent showed no progress in four years."
  • What good does it do to increase the number of students in college if the ones who are already there are not learning much? Would it not make more sense to improve the quality of education before we increase the quantity of students?
  • students in math, science, humanities, and social sciences—rather than those in more directly career-oriented fields—tend to show the most growth in the areas measured by the Collegiate Learning Assessment, the primary tool used in their study. Also, students learn more from professors with high expectations who interact with them outside of the classroom. If you do more reading, writing, and thinking, you tend to get better at those things, particularly if you have a lot of support from your teachers.
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  • Increasingly, undergraduates are not prepared adequately in any academic area but often arrive with strong convictions about their abilities.
  • It has become difficult to give students honest feedback.
  • As the college-age population declines, many tuition-driven institutions struggle to find enough paying customers to balance their budgets. That makes it necessary to recruit even more unprepared students, who then must be retained, shifting the burden for academic success away from the student and on to the teacher.
  • Although a lot of emphasis is placed on research on the tenure track, most faculty members are not on that track and are retained on the basis of what students think of them.
  • Students gravitate to lenient professors and to courses that are reputedly easy, particularly in general education.
  • It is impossible to maintain high expectations for long unless everyone holds the line in all comparable courses—and we face strong incentives not to do that.
  • Formerly, full-time, tenured faculty members with terminal degrees and long-term ties to the institution did most of the teaching. Such faculty members not only were free to grade honestly and teach with conviction but also had a deep understanding of the curriculum, their colleagues, and the institutional mission. Now undergraduate teaching relies primarily on graduate students and transient, part-time instructors on short-term contracts who teach at multiple institutions and whose performance is judged almost entirely by student-satisfaction surveys.
  • Contingent faculty members, who are paid so little, routinely teach course loads that are impossible to sustain without cutting a lot of corners.
  • Many colleges are now so packed with transient teachers, and multitasking faculty-administrators, that it is impossible to maintain some kind of logical development in the sequencing of courses.
  • Students may be enjoying high self-esteem, but college teachers seem to be suffering from a lack of self-confidence.
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    So many issues here to deal with. Good read.
D. S. Koelling

Shared Governance Is a Myth - Commentary - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 14 views

  • It takes years of rank and the bitter­sweet experience of extensive committee service to realize that faculty influence on the operation of the university is an illusion, and that shared governance is a myth.
  • Committees report to administrative officers who are at liberty to accept, reject, or substantially alter faculty recommendations.
  • One would think that faculty senates exercise jurisdiction over a range of college life and policy. In reality, the right of many senates does not extend beyond making recommendations to the president, who is under no obligation to accept them.
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  • A more probable source of this way of doing business is the residue of an old ideal of the university. Such survivals of previous practices are not unusual in social life. Physicians, for example, experience a struggle between two competing understandings of their field: the prevalent view that treating patients is a business, and the residue of the old ideal that it is a calling. Ministers live the same ambiguity. Faculty committees constitute the respect that today's university pays to the old notion that it is a community of students and scholars. The impotence of the committees is acknowledgment that at this time in history, institutions of higher education are business ventures, in certain ways similar to factories.
  • If education is primarily a business, managers hire the faculty. If universities are communities of students and scholars, faculty members hire the managers.
  • The growing disempowerment of the faculty is accelerated by the distance of governing boards from campus processes.
Florence Dujardin

Online Game Teaches Citation Skills - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 131 views

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    The game, BiblioBouts, turns collecting citations into a competitive event, pitting students against their classmates. Students are rewarded for their research skills and their ability to differentiate between good and bad material. To play, they find sources, which are judged by their peers for relevance and credibility, and then measure the worth of sources their classmates find. They gain more points the more sources they assess accurately and the better their own sources are judged.
Chris Betcher

New South Wales Teacher Education Council :: Home - 14 views

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    The New South Wales Teacher Education Council is the association of the deans of education and heads of schools of education in universities and other higher education institutions in New South Wales. It was established to promote the continued development of teacher education and meets regularly to further its goals and discuss issues of common interest.
Bill Genereux

Great moments in collegiate marketing: Drake University's 'D+' campaign | The Upshot Ya... - 26 views

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    D+ The Drake Advantage
Steve Ransom

8 Big Mistakes Online Students Make - US News and World Report - 120 views

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    8 Big Mistakes Online Students Make - US News and World Report
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