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Attention, college shoppers. These schools are slashing their prices. - The Washington ... - 15 views

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    As soaring tuition scares off many families, a growing number of private colleges have embraced a marketing tactic associated more with selling airline tickets or flat-screen televisions than higher education: a price cut. St. John's College slashed tuition from $52,734 in this school year to $35,000 in the next.
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Pearson Taps IBM's Watson as a Virtual Tutor for College Students - Bloomberg - 17 views

  • As an online tutor, Watson, a similar messenger-based tool, promises to help students any time they need it while providing insight to professors about how students are learning, according to the companies. Students will be able to ask questions of the tutor, which is capable of responding with hints, feedback and explanations.
  • “One-on-one tutoring is the Holy Grail of teaching and all educational approaches should be aimed at replicating this model,” Harriet Green, who heads IBM’s Watson Education effort, said in prepared remarks delivered in Las Vegas Tuesday. “Advanced technologies can help us to understand individual interaction patterns and enable us to tailor educational content accordingly.”
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    Future of ed?
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A growing industry caters to college cheats - 26 views

  • More than two-thirds of college students admit to having cheated on an assignment.
  • TakeYourClass.com and NoNeedtoStudy.com
  • .“The students and the people who are selling these services have the idea that all that really matters is the end, and that the processes that get you there, aren’t really significant.”To fight cheating, she said, colleges need to do a better job of teaching the value and relevance of learning.
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Explore CT school districts' achievement gap by race and ethnicity | TrendCT - 12 views

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    "Explore CT school districts' achievement gap by race and ethnicity"
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How did your school do on the new SBAC test? | The CT Mirror - 11 views

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    "How did your school do on the new SBAC test?"
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10 Signs You're in Trouble at College - US News - 24 views

  • 1. Your average is below C or you're getting D's in some of your courses.
  • 2. You're constantly asking for (and even getting) extensions and incompletes.
  • 3. You can't follow what the professor says in lecture—ever.
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  • 4. You're spending every waking moment of the day doing the reading or the homework.
  • 5. You're living off your credit cards.
  • 6. You can't get through the basic requirements.
  • 7. You're going home every weekend or on the cellphone with your parents five times a day.
  • 8. You can't get through the day without some medication.
  • 9. You spend every waking moment on some medium.
  • 10. You feel overwhelmed, all of the time.
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    I will share this with my undergraduates next semester.
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Are College Lectures Unfair? - NYTimes.com - 47 views

  • Research comparing the two methods has consistently found that students over all perform better in active-learning courses than in traditional lecture courses. However, women, minorities, and low-income and first-generation students benefit more, on average, than white males from more affluent, educated families.
  • research has demonstrated that we learn new material by anchoring it to knowledge we already possess
  • low-stakes quiz at the start of each meeting of their introductory psychology course. Compared with students who took the same course in a more traditional format, the quizzed students attended class more often and achieved higher test scores; the intervention also reduced by 50 percent the achievement gap between more affluent and less affluent students.
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  • act of putting one’s own thoughts into words and communicating them to others, research has shown, is a powerful contributor to learning. Active-learning courses regularly provide opportunities for students to talk and debate with one another in a collaborative, low-pressure environment.
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10 Things Every College Professor Hates - Business Insider - 42 views

  • 1. Don’t use unprofessional correspondence.
  • 2. Don’t ask the professor if you “missed anything important” during an absence.
  • 4. Don’t ask a question about the readings or assignments until checking the syllabus first.
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  • 3. Don’t pack up your things as the class is ending.
  • 6. Don’t grade grub.
  • 5. Don’t get mad if you receive critical feedback.
  • 7. Don’t futz with paper formatting.
  • 8. Don’t pad your introductions and conclusions with fluff.
  • 9. Don’t misrepresent facts as opinions and opinions as facts.
  • 10. Don’t be too cool for school.
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    "10 Things Every College Professor Hates"
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College is not a commodity. Stop treating it like one. - The Washington Post - 32 views

  • What truly makes an education valuable: the effort the student puts into it.
  • Unlike a car, college requires the “buyer” to do most of the work to obtain its value. The value of a degree depends more on the student’s input than on the college’s curriculum.
  • Yet most public discussion of higher ed today pretends that students simply receive their education from colleges the way a person walks out of Best Buy with a television.
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  • If colleges are responsible for outcomes, then students can feel entitled to classes that do not push them too hard, to high grades and to material that does not challenge their assumptions or make them uncomfortable.
  • This point is made succinctly by an apocryphal story about a university president who said this to new freshmen each year: “For those of you who have come here in order to get a degree, congratulations, I have good news for you. I am giving you your degree today and you can go home now. For those who came to get an education, welcome to four great years of learning at this university.”
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    "College is not a commodity. Stop treating it like one."
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Report: Students read way below level that prepares them for college, careers - CSMonit... - 30 views

  • cornerstone of reading comprehension is vocabulary
  • words that need to be learned are encountered in literature
  • Students' reading amount peaks in sixth grade
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20 essential Android apps for college students - 76 views

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    Summary: Out of the thousands on offer to make your life easier, here is a roundup of the most essential Android applications for students.
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    Summary: Out of the thousands on offer to make your life easier, here is a roundup of the most essential Android applications for students.
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The Future of College? - The Atlantic - 29 views

  • proprietary online platform developed to apply pedagogical practices that have been studied and vetted by one of the world’s foremost psychologists, a former Harvard dean named Stephen M. Kosslyn, who joined Minerva in 2012.
  • inductive reasoning
  • Minerva class extended no refuge for the timid, nor privilege for the garrulous. Within seconds, every student had to provide an answer, and Bonabeau displayed our choices so that we could be called upon to defend them.
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  • subjecting us to pop quizzes, cold calls, and pedagogical tactics that during an in-the-flesh seminar would have taken precious minutes of class time to arrange.
  • felt decidedly unlike a normal classroom. For one thing, it was exhausting: a continuous period of forced engagement, with no relief in the form of time when my attention could flag
  • One educational psychologist, Ludy Benjamin, likens lectures to Velveeta cheese—something lots of people consume but no one considers either delicious or nourishing.)
  • because I had to answer a quiz question or articulate a position. I was forced, in effect, to learn
  • adically remake one of the most sclerotic sectors of the U.S. economy, one so shielded from the need for improvement that its biggest innovation in the past 30 years has been to double its costs and hire more administrators at higher salaries.
  • past half millennium, the technology of learning has hardly budge
  • fellow edu-nauts
  • Lectures are banned
  • attending class on Apple laptops
  • Lectures, Kosslyn says, are cost-effective but pedagogically unsound. “A great way to teach, but a terrible way to learn.”
  • Minerva boast is that it will strip the university experience down to the aspects that are shown to contribute directly to student learning. Lectures, gone. Tenure, gone. Gothic architecture, football, ivy crawling up the walls—gone, gone, gone.
  • “Your cash cow is the lecture, and the lecture is over,” he told a gathering of deans. “The lecture model ... will be obliterated.”
  • One imagines tumbleweeds rolling through abandoned quads and wrecking balls smashing through the windows of classrooms left empty by students who have plugged into new online platforms.
  • when you have a noncurated academic experience, you effectively don’t get educated.
  • Liberal-arts education is about developing the intellectual capacity of the individual, and learning to be a productive member of society. And you cannot do that without a curriculum.”
  • “The freshman year [as taught at traditional schools] should not exist,” Nelson says, suggesting that MOOCs can teach the basics. “Do your freshman year at home.”) Instead, Minerva’s first-year classes are designed to inculcate what Nelson calls “habits of mind” and “foundational concepts,” which are the basis for all sound systematic thought. In a science class, for example, students should develop a deep understanding of the need for controlled experiments. In a humanities class, they need to learn the classical techniques of rhetoric and develop basic persuasive skills. The curriculum then builds from that foundation.
  • What, he asks, does it mean to be educated?
  • methods will be tested against scientifically determined best practices
  • Subsidies, Nelson says, encourage universities to enroll even students who aren’t likely to thrive, and to raise tuition, since federal money is pegged to costs.
  • We have numerous sound, reproducible experiments that tell us how people learn, and what teachers can do to improve learning.” Some of the studies are ancient, by the standards of scientific research—and yet their lessons are almost wholly ignored.
  • memory of material is enhanced by “deep” cognitive tasks
  • he found the man’s view of education, in a word, faith-based
  • ask a student to explain a concept she has been studying, the very act of articulating it seems to lodge it in her memory. Forcing students to guess the answer to a problem, and to discuss their answers in small groups, seems to make them understand the problem better—even if they guess wrong.
  • e traditional concept of “cognitive styles”—visual versus aural learners, those who learn by doing versus those who learn by studying—is muddled and wrong.
  • pedagogical best practices Kosslyn has identified have been programmed into the Minerva platform so that they are easy for professors to apply. They are not only easy, in fact, but also compulsory, and professors will be trained intensively in how to use the platform.
  • Professors are able to sort students instantly, and by many metrics, for small-group work—
  • a pop quiz at the beginning of a class and (if the students are warned in advance) another one at a random moment later in the class greatly increases the durability of what is learned.
  • he could have alerted colleagues to best practices, but they most likely would have ignored them. “The classroom time is theirs, and it is sacrosanct,
  • Lectures, Kosslyn says, are pedagogically unsound,
  • I couldn’t wait for Minerva’s wrecking ball to demolish the ivory tower.
  • The MOOCs will eventually make lectures obsolete.”
  • Minerva’s model, Nelson says, will flourish in part because it will exploit free online content, rather than trying to compete with it, as traditional universities do.
  • The MOOCs will eventually make lectures obsolete.”
  • certain functions of universities have simply become less relevant as information has become more ubiquitous
  • Minerva challenges the field to return to first principles.
  • MOOCs will continue to get better, until eventually no one will pay Duke or Johns Hopkins for the possibility of a good lecture, when Coursera offers a reliably great one, with hundreds of thousands of five-star ratings, for free.
  • It took deep concentration,” he said. “It’s not some lecture class where you can just click ‘record’ on your tape.”
  • part of the process of education happens not just through good pedagogy but by having students in places where they see the scholars working and plying their trades.”
  • “hydraulic metaphor” of education—the idea that the main task of education is to increase the flow of knowledge into the student—an “old fallacy.”
  • I remembered what I was like as a teenager headed off to college, so ignorant of what college was and what it could be, and so reliant on the college itself to provide what I’d need in order to get a good education.
  • it is designed to convey not just information, as most MOOCs seem to, but whole mental tool kits that help students become morethoughtful citizens.
  • for all the high-minded talk of liberal education— of lighting fires and raising thoughtful citizens—is really just a credential, or an entry point to an old-boys network that gets you your first job and your first lunch with the machers at your alumni club.
  • Its seminar platform will challenge professors to stop thinking they’re using technology just because they lecture with PowerPoint.
  • professors and students increasingly separated geographically, mediated through technology that alters the nature of the student-teacher relationship
  • The idea that college will in two decades look exactly as it does today increasingly sounds like the forlorn, fingers-crossed hope of a higher-education dinosaur that retirement comes before extinction.
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Mathway | About Us - 36 views

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    "Mathway provides students with the tools they need to understand and solve their math problems. With hundreds of millions of problems already solved, Mathway is the #1 problem solving resource available for students, parents, and teachers."
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