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Jennie Snyder

Partnership for 21st Century Skills - MILE Guide Self-Assessment - 79 views

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    Mile Guide -- self-assessment on 21st Century Learning
Jennie Snyder

Will Richardson: My Kids are Illiterate. Most Likely, Yours Are Too - 10 views

    • Beverly Ozburn
       
      I wonder if most parents (and even some teachers) even know what this means.  Sometimes I think we are too entrenched in old-school ways of thinking students need to know and love classics instead of understanding how literature is a reflection of the times and using the classics as mentor pieces for creating something which reflects here and now!
  • kids need to be in systems that care for them and are focused on literacy they will need to be successful in their lives instead of being focused primarily on standardizing their way to "high student achievement" based on a metric that is growing less and less relevant each day
    • Beverly Ozburn
       
      We need to really look at our definition of the word achievement!  Do we mean they have achieved a high score by regurgitating info/facts?  Do we mean they understand something and can apply that understanding in a new and meaningful way?
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  • I'm mad that the "big" conversations around "reform" in education right now all revolve around basically doing what we've been doing for the past 100 years only "better," and that we'll get there by incentivizing teachers to teach for a test.
  • That is their reality; it wasn't ours. The NCTE knows it.
    • Beverly Ozburn
       
      Just like we recognize that times are different from when my parents attended a 1-room school or when there less than 50-100 in a graduating class in a whole town, we need to recognize that times today are different.
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    Literacies needed for future success by Will Richardson
Jennie Snyder

How 21st Century Thinking Is Just Different - 2 views

  • nstead, we might consider constant reflection guided by important questions as a new way to learn in the presence of information abundance.
  • There is more information available to any student with a smartphone than an entire empire would have had access to three thousand years ago.
  • Truth may not change, but information does. And in the age of social media, it divides and duplicates in a frenzied kind of digital mitosis.
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  • new habits of mind.
  • Persisting.
  • Managing impulsivity.
  • Responding with awe.
  • Questioning.
  • Innovating.
  • Thinking interdependently.
  • This hints at the concept not so much of student motivation, but student impetus.
  • the 21st century’s model is form and interdependence.
  • How the Habits of Mind develop is not as simple as merely naming them.
  • It is one thing to remind little Johnny to persist in the face of adversity. It is another to create consistent reasons and opportunities for him to do so, and nurturing it all with modeling, resources, and visible relevance.
  • The tone of thinking in the 21st century should not be hushed nor gushing, defiant nor assimilating, but simply interdependent, conjured to function on a relevant scale within a much larger human and intellectual ecology
  • The shift towards the fluid, formless nature of information—thinking of information as a kind of perpetually oozing honey that holds variable value rather than static silhouettes and typesets that is right or wrong—is a not a small one.
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    How 21st C really is different. Think differently.
Mark Gleeson

21st Century Fluencies - 76 views

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    This blogpost discusses the aims of the 21st Century Fluency Project This resource is the collaborative effort of a group of experienced educators and entrepreneurs who have united to share their experience and ideas, and create a project geared toward making learning relevant to life in our new digital age. Our purpose is to develop exceptional resources to assist in transforming learning to be relevant to life in the 21st Century. At the core of this project are our Curriculum Integration Kits - engaging, challenge based learning modules designed to cultivate the essential 21st Century Fluencies within the context of the required curriculum.
Tonya Thomas

Future Work Skills 2020 - 3 views

  • Transdisciplinarity: literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines. More about transdisciplinarity.Virtual collaboration: ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team. More about virtual collaboration.Sense-making: ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed. More about sense-making.Social intelligence: ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions. More about social intelligence.Cross-cultural competency: ability to operate in different cultural settings. More about cross-cultural competency.Cognitive load management: ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques. More about cognitive load management.Novel and adaptive thinking: proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based. More about novel and adaptive thinking.Computational thinking: ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning. More about computational thinking.New media literacy: ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication. More about new media literacy. More about new media literacy.Design mindset: ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes. More about design mindset.
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    "Transdisciplinarity: literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines. More about transdisciplinarity. Virtual collaboration: ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team. More about virtual collaboration. Sense-making: ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed. More about sense-making. Social intelligence: ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions. More about social intelligence. Cross-cultural competency: ability to operate in different cultural settings. More about cross-cultural competency. Cognitive load management: ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques. More about cognitive load management. Novel and adaptive thinking: proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based. More about novel and adaptive thinking. Computational thinking: ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning. More about computational thinking. New media literacy: ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication. More about new media literacy. More about new media literacy. Design mindset: ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes. More about design mindset."
Tonya Thomas

New era of Workplace Learning | Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies - 0 views

  • 1 – Encourage and support individuals’ and teams’ self-sufficiency to address their own learning and performance problems.
  • So here are 5 ways that L&D can become involved:
  • 2 – Help develop autonomous workers
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  • 3 – Provide performance consulting services, where individuals and teams need help in addressing their own learning and performance problems
  • 4 – Rethink the use of learning tools and system
  • 5 – Help to develop an open, enabling culture for working and learning
  • It is clear that formal training is not going disappear overnight, but it is also becoming apparent that we are at the beginning of a fundamental shift in the way that both learning and working is happening in organisations. This should not be seen as a threat to the L&D profession, but as an opportunity to evolve the profession to take on the new challenges it offers. The first step on the path will be to become immersed in the new social media tools that are underpinning this change. Social Learning is not something you just talk or read about; it’s something you do!
Brandon Workentin

Will · The "Immeasurable" Part 2 - 98 views

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    Important things are difficult to assess. Content Knowledge is easy to assess. Great infographic showing this.
Louisa Guest

ian-jukes-7-things-we-must-change.jpg 1,007×764 pixels - 123 views

    • Louisa Guest
       
      what areas do I need to focus on to become a better teacher?
Kim Burroughs

Common Core resources · Mightybell - 7 views

    • Kim Burroughs
       
      Text complexity and the common core - appendix A&B linked here.
BalancEd Tech

ISTE 2012 Tuesday Keynote Featuring Yong Zhao - YouTube - 52 views

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    Yong Zhao starts speaking around 55 minutes in. Not showing? Try this link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijSxt94vhf0 Slides here: http://zhaolearning.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/ISTE2012.pdf
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    It says that the video is private. Any other option in order to view it?
John Mansel-Pleydell

The 33 Digital Skills Every 21st Century Teacher should Have - 61 views

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    Includes links to lots of valuable tools and resources
Mr. Eason

Educational Leadership:Teaching for the 21st Century:21st Century Skills: The Challenge... - 119 views

  • the skills students need in the 21st century are not new.
  • Critical thinking and problem solving, for example, have been components of human progress throughout history
  • What's actually new is the extent to which changes in our economy and the world mean that collective and individual success depends on having such skills
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  • Many reform efforts, from reducing class size to improving reading instruction, have devolved into fads or been implemented with weak fidelity to their core intent. The 21st century skills movement faces the same risk.
  • some of the rhetoric we have heard surrounding this movement suggests that with so much new knowledge being created, content no longer matters; that ways of knowing information are now much more important than information itself. Such notions contradict what we know about teaching and learning and raise concerns that the 21st century skills movement will end up being a weak intervention for the very students—low-income students and students of color—who most need powerful schools as a matter of social equity.
  • First, educators and policymakers must ensure that the instructional program is complete and that content is not shortchanged for an ephemeral pursuit of skills
  • Second, states, school districts, and schools need to revamp how they think about human capital in education—in particular how teachers are trained
  • Skills and knowledge are not separate, however, but intertwined.
  • inally, we need new assessments that can accurately measure richer learning and more complex tasks
  • In some cases, knowledge helps us recognize the underlying structure of a problem.
  • At other times, we know that we have a particular thinking skill, but domain knowledge is necessary if we are to use it.
  • if skills are independent of content, we could reasonably conclude that we can develop these skills through the use of any content. For example, if students can learn how to think critically about science in the context of any scientific material, a teacher should select content that will engage students (for instance, the chemistry of candy), even if that content is not central to the field. But all content is not equally important to mathematics, or to science, or to literature. To think critically, students need the knowledge that is central to the domain.
  • The importance of content in the development of thinking creates several challenges
  • first is the temptation to emphasize advanced, conceptual thinking too early in training
  • Another curricular challenge is that we don't yet know how to teach self-direction, collaboration, creativity, and innovation the way we know how to teach long division.
  • We must plan to teach skills in the context of particular content knowledge and to treat both as equally important.
  • But experience is not the same thing as practice. Experience means only that you use a skill; practice means that you try to improve by noticing what you are doing wrong and formulating strategies to do better. Practice also requires feedback, usually from someone more skilled than you are.
  • education leaders must be realistic about which skills are teachable. If we deem that such skills as collaboration and self-direction are essential, we should launch a concerted effort to study how they can be taught effectively rather than blithely assume that mandating their teaching will result in students learning them.
  • teachers don't use them.
  • Even when class sizes are reduced, teachers do not change their teaching strategies or use these student-centered method
  • these methods pose classroom management problems for teachers.
  • These methods also demand that teachers be knowledgeable about a broad range of topics and are prepared to make in-the-moment decisions as the lesson plan progresses.
  • constant juggling act
  • measures that encourage greater creativity, show how students arrived at answers, and even allow for collaboration.
  • But where will schools find the release time for such collaboration?
  • professional development is a massive undertaking.
  • Unfortunately, there is a widespread belief that teachers already know how to do this if only we could unleash them from today's stifling standards and accountability metrics. This notion romanticizes student-centered methods, underestimates the challenge of implementing such methods, and ignores the lack of capacity in the field today.
  • The first challenge is the cost.
  • greater collaboration among teachers.
  • When students first encounter new ideas, their knowledge is shallow and their understanding is bound to specific examples. They need exposure to varied examples before their understanding of a concept becomes more abstract and they can successfully apply that understanding to novel situations.
Seth Bowers

movingforward - Education Blogs by Discipline - 8 views

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    " Education Blogs by Discipline Edit 210 739… This is a place to list P-12-oriented blogs that are worth sharing with others. Only list really good blogs (not wikis or web sites), please!"
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