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Kevin Oneill

Financial Tips Corliss Group Online Magazine: Trust Facebook for investing advice? Not Yet - 1 views

Social media and financial advice aren't such an easy match after all. Sure, the initial attraction is obvious. With one stroke, advisers can woo clients with regular investment tips on Facebook a...

Financial Tips Corliss Group Online Magazine Trust Facebook for investing advice? Not yet

started by Kevin Oneill on 10 Oct 14 no follow-up yet
Valerie Fremont

Corliss Online Financial Mag on What's changing, what's not, in a shutdown - 1 views

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    WASHINGTON (AP) - October 1, 2013 (WPVI) -- Campers in national parks are to pull up stakes and leave, some veterans waiting to have disability benefits approved will have to cool their heels even longer, many routine food inspections will be suspended and panda-cams will go dark at the shuttered National Zoo. Those are among the immediate effects when parts of the government shut down Tuesday because of the budget impasse in Congress. A look at what is bound to happen, and what probably won't: ___ THIS: Possible delays in processing new disability applications. BUT NOT THIS: Social Security and Medicare benefits still keep coming. ___ THIS: Washington's paralysis will be felt early on in distant lands as well as in the capital - namely, at national parks. All park services will close. Campers have 48 hours to leave their sites. Many parks, such as Yellowstone, will close to traffic, and some will become completely inaccessible. Smithsonian museums in Washington will close and so will the zoo, where panda cams record every twitch and cuddle of the panda cub born Aug. 23 but are to be turned off in the first day of a shutdown. The Statue of Liberty in New York, the loop road at Acadia National Park in Maine, Skyline Drive in Virginia, and Philadelphia's Independence National Historical Park, home of Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell, will be off limits. At Grand Canyon National Park, people will be turned back from entrance gates and overlooks will be cordoned off along a state road inside the park that will remain open. "People who waited a year to get a reservation to go to the bottom of the Grand Canyon all of a sudden will find themselves without an opportunity to take that trip," said Mike Litterst, a spokesman for the National Park Service. More Financial News: http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-1037871 http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-1036282
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