Skip to main content

Home/ Teaching and Learning with Web 2.0/ Group items matching "thinking" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
REZA CHOWDHURY

Project Zero: Cultures of Thinking - 0 views

  • Cultures of Thinking” (CoT) as places where a group’s collective as well as individual Thinking is valued, visible, and actively promoted as part of the regular, day-to-day experience of all group members.
  • Ron Ritchhart (2002)
  • CoT project focuses
  • ...32 more annotations...
  • eight cultural forces
  • in every school, classroom, and group learning situation.
  • language, time, environment, opportunities, routines, modeling, interactions, and expectations.
  • scaffolds
  • make their own thinking visible,
  • this work doesn’t happen by teachers merely implementing a defined set of practices; it must be supported by a rich professional culture.
  • a core premise of the CoT project is
  • that for classrooms to be cultures of thinking for students
  • schools must be cultures of thinking for teachers.
  • In 2005, we began our work at Bialik College by forming two focus groups of eight teachers with whom we worked intensively. These groups were all heterogeneous, including K-12 teachers of various subjects, representing a departure from traditional forms of professional development that target specific subject areas or levels. 
  • diverse range of teachers
  • Team teaching efforts
  • developmental perspective on students’ thinking
  • In 2011, we published Making Thinking Visible,
  • which captures much of the great work being done by teachers in the project.
  • the CoT project’s research agenda
  • sought to better understand changes in teachers’ and students’ attitudes and practices as thinking becomes more visible in the school and classroom environments.
  • measures of school and classroom thoughtfulness to capture these changes.
  • at how students’ conceptual understanding of the domain of thinking developed
  • case studies of teachers
  • Our research to date has shown that students recognize CoT classrooms as being more focused on thinking, learning, and understanding, and more likely to be collaborative in nature than those of teachers not in the project
  • Teachers in the project notice that as they work with CoT ideas, their classrooms shift in noticeable ways. Specifically, they find that they give thinking more time, discussion increases, and their questioning of students shifts toward asking students to elaborate on their thinking rather than testing them on their recall of facts and procedures.
  • Our research on students’ conceptual development found that
  • over the course of a single school year, the average CoT classroom students’ growth and maturity, with respect to understanding thinking processes that they themselves use and control, increased by twice the normal rate one might expect by virtue of maturity alone (Ritchhart, Turner, Hadar, 2009).
  • Recent data on students’ language arts performance has shown superior performance by students coming from strong CoT classrooms/schools on standardized tests such as the MAEP Writing Assessment (Michigan), MCAS ELA (Massachusetts), VCE English (Victoria, Australia), and IB English exams.
  • The new book, Creating Cultures of Thinking,
  • The book draws on case studies from teachers around the world to demonstrate the power and importance of each cultural force in shaping classroom culture.
  • hese include frameworks and tools for professional learning communities, videos, and frameworks for understanding classroom questioning.
  • Though the formal research phase of the project ended in 2009, the project continues through 2013 in a support phase to develop internal leadership and outreach around these ideas.
  • he research ideas are also being taken up by many new sites, including Oakland County Michigan and Santa Fe, New Mexico. 
  • Funding: Bialik College (Melbourne, Australia) under the patronage of Abe and Vera Dorevitch 
  • Project Staff: Ron Ritchhart Mark Church (consultant)
  •  
    Project Zero: Cultures of Thinking
li li

Six cheap snapbackss, Six Colors - 1 views

Each color of the cheap snapbacks with its functions and role should be closely related. Six Thinking cheap snapbacks for sale in every cheap snapbacks has a specific color: white, red, y...

started by li li on 04 Sep 13 no follow-up yet
li li

Please show me the number of graduates six months. - 1 views

The problem is , ask the appropriate information in a normal portion . Competent lawyers asked miracle dry day . For the ideal case , the witness should wear a white cheap snapbacks thinking and...

started by li li on 04 Sep 13 no follow-up yet
Hanna Wiszniewska

Put your thinking hat on: How Edward de Bono's ideas are transforming schools - Schools, Education - The Independent - 0 views

  •  
    Teaching children how to think has brought academic success to schools in Manchester. But will techniques pioneered by the guru Edward de Bono catch on?
Todd Finley

"The Future of Privacy: How Privacy Norms Can Inform Regulation" - 6 views

  •  
    In online public spaces, interactions are public-by-default, private-through-effort, the exact opposite of what we experience offline.  There is no equivalent to the cafe where you can have a private conversation in public with a close friend without thinking about who might overhear. Your online conversations are easily overheard.  And they're often persistent, searchable, and easily spreadable. Online, we have to put effort into limiting how far information flows. We have to consciously act to curb visibility.  This runs counter to every experience we've ever had in unmediated environments.  When people participate online, they don't choose what to publicize.  They choose what to limit others from seeing.  Offline, it takes effort to get something to be seen.  Online, it takes effort for things to NOT be seen.  This is why it appears that more is public.  Because there's a lot of content out there that people don't care enough about to lock down.  I hear this from teens all the time.  "Public by default, privacy when necessary."  Teens turn to private messages or texting or other forms of communication for intimate interactions, but they don't care enough about certain information to put the effort into locking it down.  But this isn't because they don't care about privacy.  This is because they don't think that what they're saying really matters all that much to anyone.  Just like you don't care that your small talk during the conference breaks are overheard by anyone.  Of course, teens aren't aware of how their interactions in aggregate can be used to make serious assumptions about who they are, who they know, and what they might like in terms of advertising.  Just like you don't calculate who to talk to in the halls based on how a surveillance algorithm might interpret your social network.    
li li

As white cheap snapbacks thinking can not easily maintain a neutral and objective way t... - 1 views

The computer is not sentimental ( maybe we can offer people with feelings , if we to Elephant Man , as if thinking want ) , we want the computer to the cheap snapbacks need to give us the facts an...

started by li li on 04 Sep 13 no follow-up yet
ugopros

10 Electrical Safety Steps for Keeping you and your Family Safe - Professional Electrician Services in USA - 0 views

  •  
    When it comes to keeping your family safe from harm, you want to do everything in your power. Dealing with electricity can be a dangerous thing if you don't do it correctly. Teaching your family how to properly approach electrical problems can make a world of difference in their safety. Here are our top 10 electrical safety tips to help keep your family safe from harm. 1.) Avoid Overloading An Electrical Outlet And Power Strips Being in the technology age, it can sometimes be difficult to charge all of our mobile items. From your phone to your iPod, to your computer, you need to have a clear outlet space to do so. Many think the best solution is to simply add more temporary outlets to their existing hardwired outlets. This can be done with power strips and multi-outlet plugins. While these may seem convenient at first, they actually can cause major electrical problems. Overloading outlets can cause burnt plugs, and in more severe cases, full-on house fires. You should avoid using multi-outlet plugins as much as possible to reduce your family's risk of danger. 2.) Don't Yank On Electrical Cords It may seem tempting from time to time to pull on a power cord to get it out of the wall. Just because it saves you that short trip back down the hallway to unplug the sweeper, it's actually costing you more in the long run because of the wear it takes. Realize that by yanking power cords, you can damage the cord, the plug, and the actual wall outlet. In the event that your wall outlet has become loose due to being yanked on, we suggest calling a qualified electrician to fix the issue. 3.) Avoid Keeping Power Cords Near Water If you've ever noticed that the outlets in your kitchen and bathroom are shaped differently than the rest, you've seen a GFCI outlet. These are specially made to help decrease the likelihood of electrical shock in the event that water seeps into the outlet. You can do yourself a favor and protect you and your family from electrical shock b
Abhinav Outsourcings

Want Australia PR Easily & Swiftly? Engage Expert Immigration Consultants! - 0 views

  •  
    Think BIG! Think of Australia Immigration with a Permanent Residence (PR) Visa! The Land of 'Endless Opportunities' beckons skilled and ambitious business people like you! If you are one of those who could further propel the already thriving Australian economy for example, one of the skilled Auditors and/or Electronic Engineers and/or IT Professionals and/or Nurses-Down Under wants you officially.
 Lisa Durff

minds_on_fire.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 0 views

  •  
    This wrinkled world is not as flat as one might think........ http://durffsblog.blogspot.com/2008/04/this-wrinkled-world.html
  •  
    This wrinkled world is not as flat as one might think........
li li

Six pairs of sports cheap snapbacks from six thinking cheap snapbacks - 1 views

Few people want to do light , most people eventually have to take action. People tend to think cheap snapbacks the way into the future suggests cheap soccer shirts the decision which way to go , ...

started by li li on 04 Sep 13 no follow-up yet
Keith Hamon

Intro Open Ed Syllabus - OpenContent Wiki - 0 views

  •  
    The goals of the course are (1) to give you a firm grounding in the current state of the field of open education, including related topics like copyright, licensing, and sustainability, (2) to help you locate open education in the context of mainstream instructional technologies like learning objects, and (3) to get you thinking, writing, and dialoguing creatively and critically about current practices and possible alternative practices in open education
David Freeburg

Bill Gates: The Internet Will Be Responsible For The Best Education. « Epic Epoch - 18 views

  •  
    Bill Gates thinks the best education will come from the Internet. Should it?
David Wetzel

5 Benefits for Creating a Classroom Environment for Student Blogs - 0 views

  •  
    Benefits for creating a classroom environment for student blogging begin with establishing a foundation for their success. Why is this important? Integrating blogs transforms a classroom into a learning community where students become self-directed learners and thinkers. This in turn, causes students to use higher order thinking skills as they create and post entries in their blogs, along with commenting on other student's blogs.
Jeff Johnson

Big Ideas - Education (David Warlick) - 0 views

  •  
    Think about the basic priority actions that might be taken by a new Department of Education that would promote shifts in education that are relevant to today´s students and their future.
Barbara Lindsey

Weblogg-ed » Writing to Connect - 0 views

  • I’m trying to engage you in some way other than just a nod of the head or a sigh of exasperation. I’m trying to connect you to other ideas, other minds. I want a conversation, and that changes the way I write. And it changes the way we think about teaching writing. This is not simply about publishing, about taking what we did on paper and throwing it up on a blog and patting ourselves on the back.
  • Those of us who write to connect and who live our learning lives in these spaces feel the dissonance all the time. We go where we want, identify our own teachers, find what we need, share as much as we can, engage in dialogue, direct our own learning as it meets our needs and desires. That does not feel like what’s happening to my own children or most others in the “system.”
  • I literally don’t think I could do my job any longer without it - the pace of change is too rapid, the number of developments I need to follow and master too great, and without my network I would drown. But I am not drowning, indeed I feel regularly that I am enjoying surfing these waves and glance over to see other surfers right there beside me, silly grins on all of our faces. So it feels to me like it’s working, like we ARE sharing, and thriving because of it.
Hanna Wiszniewska

The Frontal Cortex : Unstructured Play - 0 views

  •  
    Play actually appears to make kids smarter. In a classic study published in Developmental Psychology in 1973, researchers divided 90 preschool children into three groups. One group was told to play freely with four common objects--among the choices were a pile of paper towels, a screwdriver, a wooden board and a pile of paper clips. A second set was asked to imitate an experimenter using the four objects in common ways. The last group was told to sit at a table and draw whatever they wanted, without ever seeing the objects. Each scenario lasted 10 minutes. Immediately afterward, the researchers asked the children to come up with ideas for how one of the objects could be used. The kids who had played with the objects named, on average, three times as many nonstandard, creative uses for the objects than the youths in either of the other two groups did, suggesting that play fosters creative thinking.
Hanna Wiszniewska

Ideas and Thoughts from an EdTech » Blog Archive » Stuff we talk about but don't do - 0 views

  •  
    Today at our Saskatchewan Curriculum Renewal workshops we were introduced to many of the new concepts and philosophies of the new curriculum. The intent of the curriculum is to reduce outcomes, provide common language for all curricula, focus more on learning than on teaching and focus on depth of understanding instead of only breadth. There was a lot of talk of big picture thinking and encouraging teachers to reflect on why they teach what they teach. Early on someone mentioned the goals of education. With some recent discussions on the purpose of education, I thought it pertinent to look up the 9 goals of education for students in Saskatchewan.
Jeff Johnson

Langwitches » Digital StoryTelling- What Comes to Mind? - 0 views

  • As many of you know, who follow me on Langwitches, I am working on a Digital Storytelling Guide for Educators. I will be using Wordle to create a storytelling cloud with words that come to mind when you think what Digital Storytelling means to or for you. Please contribute keywords, that come to YOUR mind when you think of storytelling in a comment. Don’t hesitate to add duplicate keywords what digital storytelling means to you. That way Wordle will highlight more important keywords. I will add your reponses through the comments and through Twitter and Plurk to Wordle and add the collaborative cloud to this post and as part of the cover art of the hardcover book that will be available for free download on Lulu.com . This cloud will be a digital story in itself, told by all of us!
1 - 20 of 119 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page