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Dennis OConnor

Virtual School Meanderings By Michael Barbour K-12 Certificate Series: University of Wisconsin-Stout « - 5 views

  • Continuing the Certificate Series, where I have been describing and discussing each of the certificates in online teaching that are focused on the K-12 environment. The sixth one I wanted to discuss was the E-Learning and Online teaching Graduate Certificate Program at University of Wisconsin-Stout.
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    Michael, Thanks for letting your readers know about our program. I am the advisor for the E--Learning and Online Teaching Graduate Certificate program. I also wrote and teach two of our 5 classes, E-Learning for Educators and the E-Learning Practicum. Our graduate classes are offered by the University of Wisconsin Stout, School of Education. (We are not an extension program.) I'm delighted to be able to talk with those interested in K-12 Virtual Education. I was a public school teacher for 25 years before I went fully online. Working online has been a journey of discovery and a constant reminder of the joys of being a lifetime learner. As you mention we do mix together all kinds of educators in our classes. A typical course will include K-12 classroom teachers, some K-12 online teachers and a good number of community college and university instructors. We also see health educators and some corporate trainers. Folks join us from around the country and the world. It's an eclectic mix of people who all share an interest in Teaching online. Our goal is to help people become experienced professional online teachers as a way to expand and grow their careers. To accommodate everyone's interests we have our materials highly differentiated. K-12 teachers have the option of investigating the great resources from iNacol. They are encouraged to build useful quizzes and surveys and to craft discussion prompts as they practice facilitation skills. The topics for all projects are learner selected. We emphasize a practical hands on approach where participants can use what they learn and make right away. The great thing is to see a strong community of practice develop between all kinds of educators. Everyone is richer for it. When it comes to the E-Learning Practicum, I customize each student's experience. I have managed some placements with K-12 Virtual Schools. More often, K-12 teachers take one of two options. Both involve Teaching with one of our cooperating
Michael Johnson

Teaching in Social and Technological Networks « Connectivism - 17 views

  • The model falls apart when we distribute content and extend the activities of the teacher to include multiple educator inputs and peer-driven learning.
  • Skype brings anyone, from anywhere, into a classroom. Students are not confined to interacting with only the ideas of a researcher or theorist. Instead, a student can interact directly with researchers through Twitter, blogs, Facebook, and listservs. The largely unitary voice of the traditional teacher is fragmented by the limitless conversation opportunities available in networks. When learners have control of the tools of conversation, they also control the conversations in which they choose to engage. Course content is similarly fragmented. The textbook is now augmented with YouTube videos, online articles, simulations, Second Life builds, virtual museums, Diigo content trails, StumpleUpon reflections, and so on.
  • Traditional courses provide a coherent view of a subject. This view is shaped by “learning outcomes” (or objectives). These outcomes drive the selection of content and the design of learning activities. Ideally, outcomes and content/curriculum/instruction are then aligned with the assessment. It’s all very logical: we teach what we say we are going to teach, and then we assess what we said we would teach. This cozy comfortable world of outcomes-instruction-assessment alignment exists only in education. In all other areas of life, ambiguity, uncertainty, and unkowns reign. Fragmentation of content and conversation is about to disrupt this well-ordered view of learning. Educators and universities are beginning to realize that they no longer have the control they once (thought they) did
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  • I’ve come to view teaching as a critical and needed activity in the chaotic and ambiguous information climate created by networks.
  • In networks, teachers are one node among many. Learners will, however, likely be somewhat selective of which nodes they follow and listen to. Most likely, a teacher will be one of the more prominent nodes in a learner’s network. Thoughts, ideas, or messages that the teacher amplifies will generally have a greater probability of being seen by course participants. The network of information is shaped by the actions of the teacher in drawing attention to signals (content elements) that are particularly important in a given subject area.
  • While “curator” carries the stigma of dusty museums, the metaphor is appropriate for teaching and learning. The curator, in a learning context, arranges key elements of a subject in such a manner that learners will “bump into” them throughout the course. Instead of explicitly stating “you must know this”, the curator includes critical course concepts in her dialogue with learners, her comments on blog posts, her in-class discussions, and in her personal reflections. As learners grow their own networks of understanding, frequent encounters with conceptual artifacts shared by the teacher will begin to resonate.
  • Today’s social web is no different – we find our way through active exploration. Designers can aid the wayfinding process through consistency of design and functionality across various tools, but ultimately, it is the responsibility of the individual to click/fail/recoup and continue. Fortunately, the experience of wayfinding is now augmented by social systems. Social structures are filters. As a learner grows (and prunes) her personal networks, she also develops an effective means to filter abundance. The network becomes a cognitive agent in this instance – helping the learner to make sense of complex subject areas by relying not only on her own reading and resource exploration, but by permitting her social network to filter resources and draw attention to important topics. In order for these networks to work effectively, learners must be conscious of the need for diversity and should include nodes that offer critical or antagonistic perspectives on all topic areas. Sensemaking in complex environments is a social process.
  • Aggregation should do the same – reveal the content and conversation structure of the course as it unfolds, rather than defining it in advance.
  • Filtering resources is an important educator role, but as noted already, effective filtering can be done through a combination of wayfinding, social sensemaking, and aggregation. But expertise still matters. Educators often have years or decades of experience in a field. As such, they are familiar with many of the concepts, pitfalls, confusions, and distractions that learners are likely to encounter. As should be evident by now, the educator is an important agent in networked learning. Instead of being the sole or dominant filter of information, he now shares this task with other methods and individuals.
  • Filtering can be done in explicit ways – such as selecting readings around course topics – or in less obvious ways – such as writing summary blog posts around topics. Learning is an eliminative process. By determining what doesn’t belong, a learner develops and focuses his understanding of a topic. The teacher assists in the process by providing one stream of filtered information. The student is then faced with making nuanced selections based on the multiple information streams he encounters
  • Stephen’s statements that resonated with many learners centers on modelling as a teaching practice: “To teach is to model and to demonstrate. To learn is to practice and to reflect.” (As far as I can tell, he first made the statement during OCC in 2007).
  • Modelling has its roots in apprenticeship. Learning is a multi-faceted process, involving cognitive, social, and emotional dimensions. Knowledge is similarly multi-faceted, involving declarative, procedural, and academic dimensions. It is unreasonable to expect a class environment to capture the richness of these dimensions. Apprenticeship learning models are among the most effective in attending to the full breadth of learning. Apprenticeship is concerned with more than cognition and knowledge (to know about) – it also addresses the process of becoming a carpenter, plumber, or physician.
  • Without an online identity, you can’t connect with others – to know and be known. I don’t think I’m overstating the importance of have a presence in order to participate in networks. To teach well in networks – to weave a narrative of coherence with learners – requires a point of presence. As a course progresses, the teacher provides summary comments, synthesizes discussions, provides critical perspectives, and directs learners to resources they may not have encountered before.
  • Persistent presence in the learning network is needed for the teacher to amplify, curate, aggregate, and filter content and to model critical thinking and cognitive attributes that reflect the needs of a discipline.
  • Teaching and learning in social and technological networks is similarly surprising – it’s hard to imagine that many of the tools we’re using are less than a decade old (the methods of learning in networks are not new, however. People have always learned in social networks).
  • We’re still early in many of these trends. Many questions remain unanswered about privacy, ethics in networks, and assessment.
  • We’re still early in many of these trends. Many questions remain unanswered about privacy, ethics in networks, and assessment.
  • The tools for controlling both content and conversation have shifted from the educator to the learner. We require a system that acknowledges this reality.
  • In order for these networks to work effectively, learners must be conscious of the need for diversity and should include nodes that offer critical or antagonistic perspectives on all topic areas. Sensemaking in complex environments is a social process.
  • In order for these networks to work effectively, learners must be conscious of the need for diversity and should include nodes that offer critical or antagonistic perspectives on all topic areas. Sensemaking in complex environments is a social process.
  • In order for these networks to work effectively, learners must be conscious of the need for diversity and should include nodes that offer critical or antagonistic perspectives on all topic areas. Sensemaking in complex environments is a social process.
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    Discusses the role of teachers in the learning  process through social networks: He gives seven roles 1. Amplifying, 2. Curating, 3. Wayfinding and socially-driven sensemaking, 4. Aggregating, 5. Filtering, 6. Modelling, 7. Persistent presence. He ends with this provocative thought: "My view is that change in education needs to be systemic and substantial. Education is concerned with content and conversations. The tools for controlling both content and conversation have shifted from the educator to the learner. We require a system that acknowledges this reality."
Dennis OConnor

E-Learning and Online Teaching | Scoop.it - 37 views

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    Hi impact, curated magazine of articles and professional resources for those interested in e-learning and online teaching. Published by Dennis O'Connor, Program Advisor for the University of Wisconsin Stout E-Learning and Online teaching Graduate Certificate Program.
David Wetzel

6 Top Free Online Tools for Support Teaching and Learning - 1 views

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    The six top free online tools were selected from available web 2.0 tools for teaching and learning using presentations, blogging, and bookmarking online resources. There are many excellent online tools available in these three categories, making the selection difficult at best. However, the selection was made based on reviewing available online resources along with other contributions and feedback from teachers.
Chris Herbert

Benefits of teaching writing online - 0 views

  • Encourages contact between students and faculty
  • Offers collaborative peer review,
  • Using reply-with-quote for peer revision and exchanging documents online facilitates collaborative peer review
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  • Carrying out peer review prior to teacher intervention promotes student autonomy and encourages students to take responsibility for the review and negotiation process
  • Encourages active learning
  • from both teachers and other students
  • Places emphasis on practice and on revision and peer review for continued improvement
  • A strong focus on peer revision requires a great effort on the part of students unfamiliar with the practice but ultimately gives them a skill they will use in their professional lives
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    Outlines how teaching writing online helps students and educators teach and learn.
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    Online teaching and the benefits to students and teachers.
Hanna Wiszniewska

Ideas and Thoughts from an EdTech » Blog Archive » Stuff we talk about but don't do - 0 views

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    Today at our Saskatchewan Curriculum Renewal workshops we were introduced to many of the new concepts and philosophies of the new curriculum. The intent of the curriculum is to reduce outcomes, provide common language for all curricula, focus more on learning than on teaching and focus on depth of understanding instead of only breadth. There was a lot of talk of big picture thinking and encouraging teachers to reflect on why they teach what they teach. Early on someone mentioned the goals of education. With some recent discussions on the purpose of education, I thought it pertinent to look up the 9 goals of education for students in Saskatchewan.
David Wetzel

Warning: Flipping Your Classroom May Lead to Increased Student Understanding | Teaching Science and Math - 30 views

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    Flipping a classroom is not a teaching technique, it is more in line with a philosophy or way of teaching. It involves using technology as a tool, not the main focus, for helping students increase their understanding of science or math concepts.
Ninja Essays

Best EdTech Tools for Teaching Essay Writing | North Jersey Teacher - 0 views

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    "When teaching their students how to write essays, educators have a great responsibility. Young learners are rarely interested in the process of writing, so the way you inspire them is of crucial importance. You cannot give plain instructions and tell your students to write an essay; you need to make the challenge more attractive and creative for them."
Hanna Wiszniewska

Free Technology for Teachers: Teaching Internet Search Strategies - 1 views

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    Teaching web search strategies early in the semester can prevent frustration for you and your students down the road. The Boolify Project mentioned above is suitable for students in elementary school through high school. The Primer in Boolean logic is probably best suited to high school and college students.
David Wetzel

Why Use Web 20 Tools when Teaching Science or Math? - 0 views

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    The following is a common question heard around teacher workrooms, teacher lunchrooms, faculty meetings, and science or math conferences. "Why use web 2.0 tools when teaching science or math?" The answer is both simple and complex at the same time.
Dennis OConnor

When online learning fails « Tony Bates - 0 views

  • This is another useless comparative study between online and face-to-face teaching, This study looked at 312 undergraduate students in one microeconomics course in one unnamed state university and found that male, Hispanic and low achieving students did worse online than in face-to-face classes. From this the NBER had the cheek to conclude that online learning is not all that it’s cracked up to be.
  • online courses in this study were just video recordings of the classroom lectures.
  • Will someone please tell universities and colleges in the United States that they need to redesign courses for online teaching?
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  • ‘Good teaching may overcome a poor choice of technology, but technology will never save bad teaching.’ Indeed, it usually makes it worse (the magnifier effect). Merely putting lectures (good or bad) online is bad design.
  • There should be a law against any university or college that fails to adopt well tried and tested standards in its teaching, face-to-face or online. This is criminal negligence, no less, and students should sue for fraud. But don’t blame online learning for this. It’s academic laziness and ignorance that’s at fault.
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    Tony Bates is one of the original gurus of highly interactive modern e-learning. In this blog he lets off some steam. Just reading this made me feel better.
Dennis OConnor

Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online - 0 views

  • Research into teaching online is still in its infancy. However, here are ten practices that contribute to an effective, efficient and satisfying teaching and learning experience for both faculty and students.
  • Research into teaching online is still in its infancy. However, here are ten practices that contribute to an effective, efficient and satisfying teaching and learning experience for both faculty and students.
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    Everyone interested in E-Learning class will benefit from reading these 10 tips. They are remarkably complete! Good for veterans and novices!
Dennis OConnor

UW-Stout ELearning and Online Teaching Certificate (Facebook Program Page) - 0 views

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    Here's our new program page on Facebook.  I am updating this page regularly with information for anyone interested in e-learning and online teaching best practices.  You don't have to be a current or former student to take advantage of the information and connections found here.  I do ask you to 'Like' this page if you find it useful.   (Try it! You'll Like It!)
Christopher Pappas

Educational Video Production: When educators become Producers - 0 views

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    Multimedia age has changed the role of teachers. The need for audiovisual aids to support e-learning, mobile learning, distance and blended learning have reformed the role of educators, who are now becoming producers to enrich their teaching with mediums like podcasts, videos, animations, interactive presentations.. etc. Why to use Video technology in education? Video Technology has been proven to be a very powerful tool in motivating, engaging and instructing within the educational concept. Because of the advantages of transformability and transferability that video provides, has open the horizons of teaching and learning. Video can enhance the learning experience by showing places and phenomena that otherwise could not be seen, which adds "experiential value" (Koumi, 2006) in students understanding. Moreover video allows demonstration of procedural activities in detail when used for instruction and allows personal improvement as it can be a valuable tool for self-reflection.
Susan Oxnevad

A Playlist of Resources: Avatars & Internet Safety - 0 views

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    For as long as I can remember I've been using avatars to teach Internet safety. It's a fun and engaging way to teach students the importance of protecting their identities when they are online and a great prelude to using a variety of web 2.0 tools to support the curriculum.
 Lisa Durff

CR-Teach-Act.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 1 views

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    TEACH Act Summary
lisa_morgan

Web 2.0 teaching tools to enhance education and learning - Edjudo - 0 views

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    A comprehensive list of the best web 2.0 tools and links, sorted via category, for teaching and learning with technology. tools for 3D projects, tags, photo editing, online storage, animations, blogging and lots more
Dennis OConnor

ELearning and Online Teaching - 27 views

  • Current courses offering:Universal Design & Online Accessibility
    • Lenandlar Singh
       
      Thanks!!! Experimenting with Facebook Groups myself. What have you found them to be very useful for so far?
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    Here's the E-Learning and Online Teaching Facebook Page. I post news, tips, and e-learning resources here daily. Sometimes they are based on my Diigo posts, sometimes not. Feel free to drop by and give it a 'Like'. 8-)
Jeff Johnson

CSRIU: Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use - 19 views

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    Trying to prepare students for their future and teach them about Internet safety without Web 2.0 in schools ~ is like trying to teach a child to swim without a swimming pool! The Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use has developed a new framework to address safe and responsible Internet use ~ Cyber Savvy Schools. More information here. Our Professional Resources will support the shift to Cyber Savvy Schools.
David Wetzel

Why Use an iPod Touch in Science and Math Classrooms? - 0 views

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    The iPod Touch brings a new dimension to teaching and learning in the science or math classroom - Mobile Learning! No longer are students required to only learn within the confines of their classroom when using this digital tool.
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