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Christopher Pappas

The Twitter Guide for Teachers - 0 views

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    The Twitter Guide for Teachers Twitter can be an incredible tool for both Teachers and students when used correctly. As a Teacher, your role in the process is to be professional, understanding, and as creative as possible. In regards to Twitter, the possibilities are as endless as you make them. At the Teachers Guide to Twitter you will find: How as a Teacher can you effectively utilize Twitter, a creative writing lesson plan using Twitter, 15 creative ways to use Twitter in the classroom, and 17 videos on how as a Teacher can you use Twitter in classroom! http://elearningindustry.com/the-twitter-guide-for-Teachers
Mark Cruthers

WiZiQ free Virtual Classroom - 47 views

video

free virtual_classroom virtual_whiteboard wiziq

started by Mark Cruthers on 11 May 08 no follow-up yet
Michael Johnson

Teaching in Social and Technological Networks « Connectivism - 17 views

  • The model falls apart when we distribute content and extend the activities of the teacher to include multiple educator inputs and peer-driven learning.
  • Skype brings anyone, from anywhere, into a classroom. Students are not confined to interacting with only the ideas of a researcher or theorist. Instead, a student can interact directly with researchers through Twitter, blogs, Facebook, and listservs. The largely unitary voice of the traditional teacher is fragmented by the limitless conversation opportunities available in networks. When learners have control of the tools of conversation, they also control the conversations in which they choose to engage. Course content is similarly fragmented. The textbook is now augmented with YouTube videos, online articles, simulations, Second Life builds, virtual museums, Diigo content trails, StumpleUpon reflections, and so on.
  • Traditional courses provide a coherent view of a subject. This view is shaped by “learning outcomes” (or objectives). These outcomes drive the selection of content and the design of learning activities. Ideally, outcomes and content/curriculum/instruction are then aligned with the assessment. It’s all very logical: we teach what we say we are going to teach, and then we assess what we said we would teach. This cozy comfortable world of outcomes-instruction-assessment alignment exists only in education. In all other areas of life, ambiguity, uncertainty, and unkowns reign. Fragmentation of content and conversation is about to disrupt this well-ordered view of learning. Educators and universities are beginning to realize that they no longer have the control they once (thought they) did
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  • I’ve come to view teaching as a critical and needed activity in the chaotic and ambiguous information climate created by networks.
  • In networks, teachers are one node among many. Learners will, however, likely be somewhat selective of which nodes they follow and listen to. Most likely, a teacher will be one of the more prominent nodes in a learner’s network. Thoughts, ideas, or messages that the teacher amplifies will generally have a greater probability of being seen by course participants. The network of information is shaped by the actions of the teacher in drawing attention to signals (content elements) that are particularly important in a given subject area.
  • While “curator” carries the stigma of dusty museums, the metaphor is appropriate for teaching and learning. The curator, in a learning context, arranges key elements of a subject in such a manner that learners will “bump into” them throughout the course. Instead of explicitly stating “you must know this”, the curator includes critical course concepts in her dialogue with learners, her comments on blog posts, her in-class discussions, and in her personal reflections. As learners grow their own networks of understanding, frequent encounters with conceptual artifacts shared by the teacher will begin to resonate.
  • Today’s social web is no different – we find our way through active exploration. Designers can aid the wayfinding process through consistency of design and functionality across various tools, but ultimately, it is the responsibility of the individual to click/fail/recoup and continue. Fortunately, the experience of wayfinding is now augmented by social systems. Social structures are filters. As a learner grows (and prunes) her personal networks, she also develops an effective means to filter abundance. The network becomes a cognitive agent in this instance – helping the learner to make sense of complex subject areas by relying not only on her own reading and resource exploration, but by permitting her social network to filter resources and draw attention to important topics. In order for these networks to work effectively, learners must be conscious of the need for diversity and should include nodes that offer critical or antagonistic perspectives on all topic areas. Sensemaking in complex environments is a social process.
  • Aggregation should do the same – reveal the content and conversation structure of the course as it unfolds, rather than defining it in advance.
  • Filtering resources is an important educator role, but as noted already, effective filtering can be done through a combination of wayfinding, social sensemaking, and aggregation. But expertise still matters. Educators often have years or decades of experience in a field. As such, they are familiar with many of the concepts, pitfalls, confusions, and distractions that learners are likely to encounter. As should be evident by now, the educator is an important agent in networked learning. Instead of being the sole or dominant filter of information, he now shares this task with other methods and individuals.
  • Filtering can be done in explicit ways – such as selecting readings around course topics – or in less obvious ways – such as writing summary blog posts around topics. Learning is an eliminative process. By determining what doesn’t belong, a learner develops and focuses his understanding of a topic. The teacher assists in the process by providing one stream of filtered information. The student is then faced with making nuanced selections based on the multiple information streams he encounters
  • Stephen’s statements that resonated with many learners centers on modelling as a teaching practice: “To teach is to model and to demonstrate. To learn is to practice and to reflect.” (As far as I can tell, he first made the statement during OCC in 2007).
  • Modelling has its roots in apprenticeship. Learning is a multi-faceted process, involving cognitive, social, and emotional dimensions. Knowledge is similarly multi-faceted, involving declarative, procedural, and academic dimensions. It is unreasonable to expect a class environment to capture the richness of these dimensions. Apprenticeship learning models are among the most effective in attending to the full breadth of learning. Apprenticeship is concerned with more than cognition and knowledge (to know about) – it also addresses the process of becoming a carpenter, plumber, or physician.
  • Without an online identity, you can’t connect with others – to know and be known. I don’t think I’m overstating the importance of have a presence in order to participate in networks. To teach well in networks – to weave a narrative of coherence with learners – requires a point of presence. As a course progresses, the teacher provides summary comments, synthesizes discussions, provides critical perspectives, and directs learners to resources they may not have encountered before.
  • Persistent presence in the learning network is needed for the teacher to amplify, curate, aggregate, and filter content and to model critical thinking and cognitive attributes that reflect the needs of a discipline.
  • Teaching and learning in social and technological networks is similarly surprising – it’s hard to imagine that many of the tools we’re using are less than a decade old (the methods of learning in networks are not new, however. People have always learned in social networks).
  • We’re still early in many of these trends. Many questions remain unanswered about privacy, ethics in networks, and assessment.
  • We’re still early in many of these trends. Many questions remain unanswered about privacy, ethics in networks, and assessment.
  • The tools for controlling both content and conversation have shifted from the educator to the learner. We require a system that acknowledges this reality.
  • In order for these networks to work effectively, learners must be conscious of the need for diversity and should include nodes that offer critical or antagonistic perspectives on all topic areas. Sensemaking in complex environments is a social process.
  • In order for these networks to work effectively, learners must be conscious of the need for diversity and should include nodes that offer critical or antagonistic perspectives on all topic areas. Sensemaking in complex environments is a social process.
  • In order for these networks to work effectively, learners must be conscious of the need for diversity and should include nodes that offer critical or antagonistic perspectives on all topic areas. Sensemaking in complex environments is a social process.
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    Discusses the role of teachers in the learning  process through social networks: He gives seven roles 1. Amplifying, 2. Curating, 3. Wayfinding and socially-driven sensemaking, 4. Aggregating, 5. Filtering, 6. Modelling, 7. Persistent presence. He ends with this provocative thought: "My view is that change in education needs to be systemic and substantial. Education is concerned with content and conversations. The tools for controlling both content and conversation have shifted from the educator to the learner. We require a system that acknowledges this reality."
Christopher Pappas

Teachers Are Heroes Infographic | e-Learning Infographics - 0 views

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    Teachers Are Heroes Infographic Teachers change the world by spreading knowledge and making impact on their students. Learn more about how Teachers are heroes and how they shape not only our education, but our entire world. http://elearninginfographics.com/Teachers-are-heroes-infographic/
REZA CHOWDHURY

Project Zero: Cultures of Thinking - 0 views

  • Cultures of Thinking” (CoT) as places where a group’s collective as well as individual thinking is valued, visible, and actively promoted as part of the regular, day-to-day experience of all group members.
  • Ron Ritchhart (2002)
  • CoT project focuses
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  • eight cultural forces
  • in every school, classroom, and group learning situation.
  • language, time, environment, opportunities, routines, modeling, interactions, and expectations.
  • scaffolds
  • make their own thinking visible,
  • this work doesn’t happen by teachers merely implementing a defined set of practices; it must be supported by a rich professional culture.
  • a core premise of the CoT project is
  • that for classrooms to be cultures of thinking for students
  • schools must be cultures of thinking for teachers.
  • In 2005, we began our work at Bialik College by forming two focus groups of eight teachers with whom we worked intensively. These groups were all heterogeneous, including K-12 teachers of various subjects, representing a departure from traditional forms of professional development that target specific subject areas or levels. 
  • diverse range of teachers
  • Team teaching efforts
  • developmental perspective on students’ thinking
  • In 2011, we published Making Thinking Visible,
  • which captures much of the great work being done by teachers in the project.
  • the CoT project’s research agenda
  • sought to better understand changes in teachers’ and students’ attitudes and practices as thinking becomes more visible in the school and classroom environments.
  • measures of school and classroom thoughtfulness to capture these changes.
  • at how students’ conceptual understanding of the domain of thinking developed
  • case studies of teachers
  • Our research to date has shown that students recognize CoT classrooms as being more focused on thinking, learning, and understanding, and more likely to be collaborative in nature than those of teachers not in the project
  • Teachers in the project notice that as they work with CoT ideas, their classrooms shift in noticeable ways. Specifically, they find that they give thinking more time, discussion increases, and their questioning of students shifts toward asking students to elaborate on their thinking rather than testing them on their recall of facts and procedures.
  • Our research on students’ conceptual development found that
  • over the course of a single school year, the average CoT classroom students’ growth and maturity, with respect to understanding thinking processes that they themselves use and control, increased by twice the normal rate one might expect by virtue of maturity alone (Ritchhart, Turner, Hadar, 2009).
  • Recent data on students’ language arts performance has shown superior performance by students coming from strong CoT classrooms/schools on standardized tests such as the MAEP Writing Assessment (Michigan), MCAS ELA (Massachusetts), VCE English (Victoria, Australia), and IB English exams.
  • The new book, Creating Cultures of Thinking,
  • The book draws on case studies from teachers around the world to demonstrate the power and importance of each cultural force in shaping classroom culture.
  • hese include frameworks and tools for professional learning communities, videos, and frameworks for understanding classroom questioning.
  • Though the formal research phase of the project ended in 2009, the project continues through 2013 in a support phase to develop internal leadership and outreach around these ideas.
  • he research ideas are also being taken up by many new sites, including Oakland County Michigan and Santa Fe, New Mexico. 
  • Funding: Bialik College (Melbourne, Australia) under the patronage of Abe and Vera Dorevitch 
  • Project Staff: Ron Ritchhart Mark Church (consultant)
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    Project Zero: Cultures of Thinking
Christopher Pappas

The Edmodo Cheat Sheet For Teachers Infographic | e-Learning Infographics - 1 views

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    The Edmodo Cheat Sheet For Teachers Infographic Edmodo provides Teachers and students a secure place to connect and collaborate, share content and educational applications, and access homework, grades, class discussions and notifications. Edmodo is a social learning platform for Teachers, students, and parents that can be incorporated into classrooms through a variety of applications. Make your daily life easier by engaging with you students through secure classroom discussions, posting assignments, gradebook tracking, file sharing and uploading, and many many more. http://elearninginfographics.com/the-edmodo-cheat-sheet-for-Teachers-infographic/
Barbara Lindsey

My School, Meet MySpace: Social Networking at School | Edutopia - 1 views

  • Months before the newly hired teachers at Philadelphia's Science Leadership Academy (SLA) started their jobs, they began the consuming work of creating the high school of their dreams -- without meeting face to face. They articulated a vision, planned curriculum, designed assessment rubrics, debated discipline policies, and even hammered out daily schedules using the sort of networking tools -- messaging, file swapping, idea sharing, and blogging -- kids love on sites such as MySpace.
  • hen, weeks before the first day of school, the incoming students jumped onboard -- or, more precisely, onto the Science Leadership Academy Web site -- to meet, talk with their teachers, and share their hopes for their education. So began a conversation that still perks along 24/7 in SLA classrooms and cyberspace. It's a bold experiment to redefine learning spaces, the roles and relationships of teachers and students, and the mission of the modern high school.
  • When I hear people say it's our job to create the twenty-first-century workforce, it scares the hell out of me," says Chris Lehmann, SLA's founding principal. "Our job is to create twenty-first-century citizens. We need workers, yes, but we also need scholars, activists, parents -- compassionate, engaged people. We're not reinventing schools to create a new version of a trade school. We're reinventing schools to help kids be adaptable in a world that is changing at a blinding rate."
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  • It's the spirit of science rather than hardcore curriculum that permeates SLA. "In science education, inquiry-based learning is the foothold," Lehmann says. "We asked, 'What does it mean to build a school where everything is based on the core values of science: inquiry, research, collaboration, presentation, and reflection?'"
  • It means the first-year curriculum is built around essential questions: Who am I? What influences my identity? How do I interact with my world? In addition to science, math, and engineering, core courses include African American history, Spanish, English, and a basic how-to class in technology that also covers Internet safety and the ethical use of information and software. Classes focus less on facts to be memorized and more on skills and knowledge for students to master independently and incorporate into their lives. Students rarely take tests; they write reflections and do "culminating" projects. Learning doesn't merely cross disciplines -- it shatters outdated departmental divisions. Recently, for instance, kids studied atomic weights in biochemistry (itself a homegrown interdisciplinary course), did mole calculations in algebra, and created Dalton models (diagrams that illustrate molecular structures) in art.
  • This is Dewey for the digital age, old-fashioned progressive education with a technological twist.
  • computers and networking are central to learning at, and shaping the culture of, SLA. "
  • he zest to experiment -- and the determination to use technology to run a school not better, but altogether differently -- began with Lehmann and the teachers last spring when they planned SLA online. Their use of Moodle, an open source course-management system, proved so easy and inspired such productive collaboration that Lehmann adopted it as the school's platform. It's rare to see a dog-eared textbook or pad of paper at SLA; everybody works on iBooks. Students do research on the Internet, post assignments on class Moodle sites, and share information through forums, chat, bookmarks, and new software they seem to discover every day.
  • Teachers continue to use Moodle to plan, dream, and learn, to log attendance and student performance, and to talk about everything -- from the student who shows up each morning without a winter coat to cool new software for tagging research sources. There's also a schoolwide forum called SLA Talk, a combination bulletin board, assembly, PA system, and rap session.
  • Web technology, of course, can do more than get people talking with those they see every day; people can communicate with anyone anywhere. Students at SLA are learning how to use social-networking tools to forge intellectual connections.
  • In October, Lehmann noticed that students were sorting themselves by race in the lunchroom and some clubs. He felt disturbed and started a passionate thread on self-segregation.
  • "Having the conversation changed the way kids looked at themselves," he says.
  • "What I like best about this school is the sense of community," says student Hannah Feldman. "You're not just here to learn, even though you do learn a lot. It's more like a second home."
  • As part of the study of memoirs, for example, Alexa Dunn's English class read Funny in Farsi, Firoozeh Dumas's account of growing up Iranian in the United States -- yes, the students do read books -- and talked with the author in California via Skype. The students also wrote their own memoirs and uploaded them to SLA's network for the teacher and class to read and edit. Then, digital arts teacher Marcie Hull showed the students GarageBand, which they used to turn their memoirs into podcasts. These they posted on the education social-networking site EduSpaces (formerly Elgg); they also posted blogs about the memoirs.
LUCIAN DUMA

Do you want to be a mentor or a learner than you should join TEACHER CHALLENGE #edchat #ksyb #ebshare #ntchat #eltchat #ntchat #education - #edtech20 - 0 views

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    Teacher Challenge - Connecting Teachers through free professional learning .
Dennis OConnor

Virtual School Meanderings By Michael Barbour K-12 Certificate Series: University of Wisconsin-Stout « - 5 views

  • Continuing the Certificate Series, where I have been describing and discussing each of the certificates in online teaching that are focused on the K-12 environment. The sixth one I wanted to discuss was the E-Learning and Online Teaching Graduate Certificate Program at University of Wisconsin-Stout.
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    Michael, Thanks for letting your readers know about our program. I am the advisor for the E--Learning and Online Teaching Graduate Certificate program. I also wrote and teach two of our 5 classes, E-Learning for Educators and the E-Learning Practicum. Our graduate classes are offered by the University of Wisconsin Stout, School of Education. (We are not an extension program.) I'm delighted to be able to talk with those interested in K-12 Virtual Education. I was a public school teacher for 25 years before I went fully online. Working online has been a journey of discovery and a constant reminder of the joys of being a lifetime learner. As you mention we do mix together all kinds of educators in our classes. A typical course will include K-12 classroom teachers, some K-12 online teachers and a good number of community college and university instructors. We also see health educators and some corporate trainers. Folks join us from around the country and the world. It's an eclectic mix of people who all share an interest in teaching online. Our goal is to help people become experienced professional online teachers as a way to expand and grow their careers. To accommodate everyone's interests we have our materials highly differentiated. K-12 teachers have the option of investigating the great resources from iNacol. They are encouraged to build useful quizzes and surveys and to craft discussion prompts as they practice facilitation skills. The topics for all projects are learner selected. We emphasize a practical hands on approach where participants can use what they learn and make right away. The great thing is to see a strong community of practice develop between all kinds of educators. Everyone is richer for it. When it comes to the E-Learning Practicum, I customize each student's experience. I have managed some placements with K-12 Virtual Schools. More often, K-12 teachers take one of two options. Both involve teaching with one of our cooperating
Ninja Essays

Great Educational Tools for All Teachers and Students - Berkeley, CA - 0 views

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    "Modern educational technology provides endless opportunities for teachers to make the educational process more interesting and students to become more motivated to learn. teachers from all around the world have started to rely on educational tools that enhance the students' performance and participation in the classroom."
milesmorales

What You Have To Know About Homeschooling - 1 views

Homeschooling can be a good way for your children to learn, but if they don't have a good teacher, then your homeschooling efforts will be worthless. A good teacher is one of the most important asp...

started by milesmorales on 14 Aug 14 no follow-up yet
David Wetzel

Top 5 Search Tools for Finding Flickr Images for Use in Education - 0 views

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    The top five search tools for finding Flickr images are designed to help teachers and students locate just the right image for use in any subject area and project. Without these tools finding the right image on this image hosting site is often an impossible, or at least a tedious, task. The value of this site is its ability to provide digital pictures which are often impossible for a teacher to obtain any other way. Like everything else on the internet, trying to find something is like trying to find a needle in a haystack. This where the top five search tools become valuable resources for teachers and students trying to find images comes into play. These search engines are specifically designed to search the more than three billion pictures on the Flickr hosting site.
Jean-Yves HEMLIN

Free Technology for Teachers: 60 of the Best Websites and Apps for Teachers - 0 views

  • 60 of the Best Websites and Apps for Teachers
  •  
    "60 of the Best Websites and Apps for Teachers "
Dan Sherman

MATH PRACTICE AND LEARNING - FREE FOR TEACHERS - 4 views

TenMarks is the best math practice and learning program for grades 3-High School- and as of today, it's FREE for teachers to use - in class or for their students to use at home. The TenMarks appro...

education web2.0 tools Technology resources learning teaching free

started by Dan Sherman on 09 Nov 10 no follow-up yet
Hanna Wiszniewska

Free Technology for Teachers: What is RSS? - 0 views

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    As a teacher, using an RSS reader can help you stay informed and up to date on new information related to your content area and practice. People often ask me how I find so much information about new technology resources, the answer is simple, I scan roughly 600 updates in my RSS reader every day. Obviously you don't have to subscribe to as many websites as I do to stay informed, but my RSS addiction does demonstrate how much time a person can save and how much information a person can find by using an RSS reader. If I didn't use an RSS reader there is no way that I could find so much information in a couple of hours each day. (As a side note, I'm going camping for six days without Internet access when I get back, I'll have thousands of items to scan through). If you maintain a blog or website for your classroom, having your students use RSS readers is a good way to keep them informed of new information you've posted. For teachers that address current events in their curriculum, having students use RSS readers is a good way for them to track developments in news stories.
LUCIAN DUMA

Teachers you should vote for favorite #edtech20 #edtools in Learning Tools Directory 2011 make by @C4LPT . I recommand @GlogsterEdu and @SymbalooEdu - 0 views

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    Teachers you should vote for favorite #edtech20 #edtools in Learning Tools Directory 2011 make by @C4LPT . I recommand @GlogsterEdu and @SymbalooEdu
LUCIAN DUMA

BLOGGING USING WEB 2.0 AND SOCIAL MEDIA IN XXI CENTURY EDUCATION: Happy #EuropeDay 2011 teachers around the European Union . - 3 views

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     Happy #EuropeDay 2011 teachers around the European Union 
Nica Nogard

Must Have Teacher Interview Guide - 1 views

I am a newly qualified teacher and I am very excited to work on my first job. I already applied to one of the most prestigious universities in our place yet I am a little bit hesitant if I can answ...

teacher interview questions

started by Nica Nogard on 23 Mar 12 no follow-up yet
Stephen Mark

Workshop for Engineering Teachers - 0 views

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    Latest campus news on workshop in Gujarat Technical University, workshop for teachers, workshop for students, engineering workshop ideas and many more
Christopher Pappas

12 YouTube Videos Every Online Educator Should View - 0 views

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    12 YouTube Videos Every Online Educator Should View What are the benefits for the teacher and learner in the context of open education and OER? How does a blended-learning school boost student achievement? How can we design the schools for 21st Century Learning? How will be the classroom of tomorrow? What are the tools and resources for the 21st Century Educator? At the 12 YouTube Videos Every Online Educator Should View you will be able to answer the above questions and even more. You will get an idea of what your students are capable of and what are expecting from you. Do not forget that educational technology is the median and it is hear to help you achieve better learning outcomes. It is in your hand how effectively you will use it since we are the digital immigrants and our students/learners are the digital natives! http://elearningindustry.com/subjects/concepts/item/395-12-youtube-videos-teacher-educator-should-view
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