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titechnologies

Choosing the right Engagement Model for Business Software Development - TI Technologies - 0 views

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    Software Development has formed the economic and social face of the planet within the most recent 3 decades. What was once thought of gibber and kept to the elite minds that place humans on the Moon and cracked the German Enigma is currently a well-liked profession that has created landmarks just like the Silicon Valley and icons like Bill Gates and Steve Jobs. With the spurt in revolutionary product ideas within the late 90s, the need to place those 'thoughts' into execution demanded the best development-skills, and this 'request' has been solely developing with time. This conveys us to an aspect of software development that has perpetually been a significant business call for companies - the foremost cost-effective engagement model. Here is what we think regarding selecting the right engagement model: Fixed Price Model Fixing the price is about fixing the project requirements, scope, as well as deadlines. This model can never work while not thorough initial planning, analysis, and estimation sessions. The more planning you do, the better the result. Why is the planning stage so important? The success of the fixed price project is directly proportional to the success of this primary phase. To have a superior control over a greater project, the engagement model may be somewhat changed with deliverables & milestones approach. A customer is charged because the in agreement milestones have come and deliverables are in situ. From that point forward, another stage with its own particular milestones and deliverables can start. For the majority of effectively fixed price projects, discovery phase fills in as the beginning point. Choose Fixed Price Engagement Model when: Requirements are clear, very much characterized and improbable to change You deal with a small or medium project which won't last for more than few months The Pros: It's well-defined and well-negotiated. There's no room for lapses. There is a push to get the total picture of the software even befo
Michael Johnson

E-Learning 2.0 ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes - 20 views

  • In general, where we are now in the online world is where we were before the beginning of e-learning [1]. Traditional theories of distance learning, of (for example) transactional distance, as described by Michael G. Moore, have been adapted for the online world. Content is organized according to this traditional model and delivered either completely online or in conjunction with more traditional seminars, to cohorts of students, led by an instructor, following a specified curriculum to be completed at a predetermined pace.
  • networked markets
  • In learning, these trends are manifest in what is sometimes called "learner-centered" or "student-centered" design. This is more than just adapting for different learning styles or allowing the user to change the font size and background color; it is the placing of the control of learning itself into the hands of the learner
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  • creation, communication and participation playing key roles
  • The breaking down of barriers has led to many of the movements and issues we see on today's Internet. File-sharing, for example, evolves not of a sudden criminality among today's youth but rather in their pervasive belief that information is something meant to be shared. This belief is manifest in such things as free and open-source software, Creative Commons licenses for content, and open access to scholarly and other works. Sharing content is not considered unethical; indeed, the hoarding of content is viewed as antisocial [9]. And open content is viewed not merely as nice to have but essential for the creation of the sort of learning network described by Siemens [10].
  • "Enter Web 2.0, a vision of the Web in which information is broken up into "microcontent" units that can be distributed over dozens of domains. The Web of documents has morphed into a Web of data. We are no longer just looking to the same old sources for information. Now we're looking to a new set of tools to aggregate and remix microcontent in new and useful ways"
  • Web 2.0 is not a technological revolution, it is a social revolution.
  • It also begins to look like a personal portfolio tool [18]. The idea here is that students will have their own personal place to create and showcase their own work. Some e-portfolio applications, such as ELGG, have already been created. IMS Global as put together an e-portfolio specification [19]. "The portfolio can provide an opportunity to demonstrate one's ability to collect, organize, interpret and reflect on documents and sources of information. It is also a tool for continuing professional development, encouraging individuals to take responsibility for and demonstrate the results of their own learning" [20].
    • Michael Johnson
       
      Also a place to receive and give feedback. I believe that one of the things that learners need to have to be prepared for learning in this space (social media or web 2.0) is the ability to evaluate, to give good feedback. Additionally, to be able to receive feedback constructively.
  • In the world of e-learning, the closest thing to a social network is a community of practice, articulated and promoted by people such as Etienne Wenger in the 1990s. According to Wenger, a community of practice is characterized by "a shared domain of interest" where "members interact and learn together" and "develop a shared repertoire of resources."
  • Yahoo! Groups
  • Blogging is very different from traditionally assigned learning content. It is much less formal. It is written from a personal point of view, in a personal voice. Students' blog posts are often about something from their own range of interests, rather than on a course topic or assigned project. More importantly, what happens when students blog, and read reach others' blogs, is that a network of interactions forms-much like a social network, and much like Wenger's community of practice.
    • Michael Johnson
       
      So, I believe he is saying that virtual communities of practice that form naturally are more real and approach what Wenger was talking about better than contrived "communities" put together in classes. That may be true. but does it have to be? If people come together to with a common purpose and the instructor allows the students freedom to explore what is important to them then I would hope that this kind of community can develop even in formal educational settings. Relevance is a key issue here!
  • "We're talking to the download generation," said Peter Smith, associate dean, Faculty of Engineering. "Why not have the option to download information about education and careers the same way you can download music? It untethers content from the Web and lets students access us at their convenience." Moreover, using an online service such as Odeo, Blogomatrix Sparks, or even simply off-the-shelf software, students can create their own podcasts.
  • Web 2.0 is not a technological revolution, it is a social revolution. "Here's my take on it: Web 2.0 is an attitude not a technology. It's about enabling and encouraging participation through open applications and services. By open I mean technically open with appropriate APIs but also, more importantly, socially open, with rights granted to use the content in new and exciting contexts"
  • The e-learning application, therefore, begins to look very much like a blogging tool. It represents one node in a web of content, connected to other nodes and content creation services used by other students. It becomes, not an institutional or corporate application, but a personal learning center, where content is reused and remixed according to the student's own needs and interests. It becomes, indeed, not a single application, but a collection of interoperating applications—an environment rather than a system.
  • This approach to learning means that learning content is created and distributed in a very different manner. Rather than being composed, organized and packaged, e-learning content is syndicated, much like a blog post or podcast. It is aggregated by students, using their own personal RSS reader or some similar application. From there, it is remixed and repurposed with the student's own individual application in mind, the finished product being fed forward to become fodder for some other student's reading and use.
    • Michael Johnson
       
      I like the idea of students passing on their work to be fodder for someone else's learning. In this way we change to from a learner to a learner/teacher! (See Dillon Inouye's work and Comments from John Seeley Brown)
  • More formally, instead of using enterprise learning-management systems, educational institutions expect to use an interlocking set of open-source applications. Work on such a set of applications has begun in a number of quarters, with the E-Learning Framework defining a set of common applications and the newly formed e-Framework for Education and Research drawing on an international collaboration. While there is still an element of content delivery in these systems, there is also an increasing recognition that learning is becoming a creative activity and that the appropriate venue is a platform rather than an application.
    • Michael Johnson
    • Michael Johnson
       
      Jon Mott has some cool ideas related to this paragraph.
  • Words are only meaningful when they can be related to experiences," said Gee. If I say "I spilled the coffee," this has a different meaning depending on whether I ask for a broom or a mop. You cannot create that context ahead of time— it has to be part of the experience.
  • game "modding" allows players to make the game their own
  • he most important learning skills that I see children getting from games are those that support the empowering sense of taking charge of their own learning. And the learner taking charge of learning is antithetical to the dominant ideology of curriculum design
  • The challenge will not be in how to learn, but in how to use learning to create something more, to communicate.
    • Michael Johnson
       
      I still think part of the challenge is how to learn. How to wade through a sea of all that is out there and "learn from the best" that is available. Find, organize, evaluate, analyze, synthesize, as well as create. I agree with Chris Lott (@fncll) that creativity is vital! (I am just not so sure that it is a non-starter to say that we should be moral first...though it could be argued that we should become moral through the creative process).
  • "ubiquitous computing."
  • what this means is having learning available no matter what you are doing.
  • A similar motivation underlies the rapidly rising domain of mobile learning [24]—for after all, were the context in which learning occurs not important, it would not be useful or necessary to make learning mobile. Mobile learning offers not only new opportunities to create but also to connect. As Ellen Wagner and Bryan Alexander note, mobile learning "define(s) new relationships and behaviors among learners, information, personal computing devices, and the world at large"
  • And what people were doing with the Web was not merely reading books, listening to the radio or watching TV, but having a conversation, with a vocabulary consisting not just of words but of images, video, multimedia and whatever they could get their hands on. And this became, and looked like, and behaved like, a network.
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    Stephen Downes' take on eLearning and what the future holds
Todd Finley

"The Future of Privacy: How Privacy Norms Can Inform Regulation" - 6 views

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    In online public spaces, interactions are public-by-default, private-through-effort, the exact opposite of what we experience offline.  There is no equivalent to the cafe where you can have a private conversation in public with a close friend without thinking about who might overhear. Your online conversations are easily overheard.  And they're often persistent, searchable, and easily spreadable. Online, we have to put effort into limiting how far information flows. We have to consciously act to curb visibility.  This runs counter to every experience we've ever had in unmediated environments.  When people participate online, they don't choose what to publicize.  They choose what to limit others from seeing.  Offline, it takes effort to get something to be seen.  Online, it takes effort for things to NOT be seen.  This is why it appears that more is public.  Because there's a lot of content out there that people don't care enough about to lock down.  I hear this from teens all the time.  "Public by default, privacy when necessary."  Teens turn to private messages or texting or other forms of communication for intimate interactions, but they don't care enough about certain information to put the effort into locking it down.  But this isn't because they don't care about privacy.  This is because they don't think that what they're saying really matters all that much to anyone.  Just like you don't care that your small talk during the conference breaks are overheard by anyone.  Of course, teens aren't aware of how their interactions in aggregate can be used to make serious assumptions about who they are, who they know, and what they might like in terms of advertising.  Just like you don't calculate who to talk to in the halls based on how a surveillance algorithm might interpret your social network.    
Christopher Pappas

The Best LinkedIn Groups About eLearning - 0 views

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    The Best LinkedIn Groups About eLearning LinkedIn is my favorite social network because the most of its members are acting as professionals! This is why I created a list of the best LinkedIn Groups about eLearning! Would you like to network with Instructional Designers and eLearning professionals? Would you like to find eLearning companies for business collaborations? Would you like to find a temporary or a project based job at the eLearning field? The list of the following Best LinkedIn Groups about eLearning could help you achieve more than that. http://elearningindustry.com/subjects/general/item/383-the-best-linkedin-groups-about-elearning linkedin elearning linkedin groups about elearning best linkedin groups best linkedin group about elearning instructional design freelancers elearning
Pinhopes Job Site

Why an interview is a lot like going on a first date | Pinhopes - 0 views

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    Going for an interview is like going for a first date. You want to look and behave your best at your first date/interview, to grab your potential date/employer's attention. like in a date so in an interview, you get only one chance to create an impeccable first impression, to prove why you are the perfect match for the job.
titechnologies

Top 11 Tips to Improve AngularJS Performance - TI Technologies - 0 views

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    AngularJS is made to rearrange the complex process of building and overseeing JavaScript applications. In view of the Model-View-Controller, or MVC, programming structure, AngularJS is particularly valuable for making single page web apps. Today, online businesses are enormously affected by the performance of web technologies that they use for their respective tasks. Henceforth, it winds up the importance to dive into the majority of the elements that are harming their business growth. AngularJS can rapidly be added to any HTML page with a straightforward tag. In case you're asking why you have a couple of slow pages, here are a few hints to accelerate your code. AngularJS Optimization Tips Batarang Tool to Benchmark Watchers Batarang is an awesome dev tool from the AngularJS developer that brings down your debugging efforts. In spite of the fact that it has numerous new features, some of them enable you to profile and track the execution of your AngularJS performance. In addition, the watch tree figures out which extensions are not destroyed as it is by all accounts if there is an increase in the memory. Chrome Dev Tool Profiler to Identify Performance Bottlenecks This one is a helpful device that gives you the alternative to choose which profile type you need to make. Take Heap Snapshot, Record Allocation Timeline, and Record Allocation Profile are utilized for memory profiling. After this performance improvement, your app will complete in under two seconds and clients can freely connect with it then. Limit your watchers Talking about which, whenever you introduce data-bindings, you make more $scopes and $$watchers, which drags out the digest cycle. Excessively numerous $$watchers can cause lag, so restrain their utilization as much as possible. Utilize scope.$evalAsync On the off chance that you endeavor to manually initiate the digest cycle while it's now running, you could get an error. To keep this from happening, utilize scope.$evalAsync rather than $appl
Barbara Lindsey

Minds on Fire: Open Education, the Long Tail, and Learning 2.0 (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE CONNECT - 1 views

  • But at the same time that the world has become flatter, it has also become “spikier”: the places that are globally competitive are those that have robust local ecosystems of resources supporting innovation and productiveness.2
  • various initiatives launched over the past few years have created a series of building blocks that could provide the means for transforming the ways in which we provide education and support learning. Much of this activity has been enabled and inspired by the growth and evolution of the Internet, which has created a global “platform” that has vastly expanded access to all sorts of resources, including formal and informal educational materials. The Internet has also fostered a new culture of sharing, one in which content is freely contributed and distributed with few restrictions or costs.
  • the most visible impact of the Internet on education to date has been the Open Educational Resources (OER) movement, which has provided free access to a wide range of courses and other educational materials to anyone who wants to use them. The movement began in 2001 when the William and Flora Hewlett and the Andrew W. Mellon foundations jointly funded MIT’s OpenCourseWare (OCW) initiative, which today provides open access to undergraduate- and graduate-level materials and modules from more than 1,700 courses (covering virtually all of MIT’s curriculum). MIT’s initiative has inspired hundreds of other colleges and universities in the United States and abroad to join the movement and contribute their own open educational resources.4 The Internet has also been used to provide students with direct access to high-quality (and therefore scarce and expensive) tools like telescopes, scanning electron microscopes, and supercomputer simulation models, allowing students to engage personally in research.
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  • most profound impact of the Internet, an impact that has yet to be fully realized, is its ability to support and expand the various aspects of social learning. What do we mean by “social learning”? Perhaps the simplest way to explain this concept is to note that social learning is based on the premise that our understanding of content is socially constructed through conversations about that content and through grounded interactions, especially with others, around problems or actions. The focus is not so much on what we are learning but on how we are learning.5
  • This perspective shifts the focus of our attention from the content of a subject to the learning activities and human interactions around which that content is situated. This perspective also helps to explain the effectiveness of study groups. Students in these groups can ask questions to clarify areas of uncertainty or confusion, can improve their grasp of the material by hearing the answers to questions from fellow students, and perhaps most powerfully, can take on the role of teacher to help other group members benefit from their understanding (one of the best ways to learn something is, after all, to teach it to others).
  • This encourages the practice of what John Dewey called “productive inquiry”—that is, the process of seeking the knowledge when it is needed in order to carry out a particular situated task.
  • ecoming a trusted contributor to Wikipedia involves a process of legitimate peripheral participation that is similar to the process in open source software communities. Any reader can modify the text of an entry or contribute new entries. But only more experienced and more trusted individuals are invited to become “administrators” who have access to higher-level editing tools.8
  • by clicking on tabs that appear on every page, a user can easily review the history of any article as well as contributors’ ongoing discussion of and sometimes fierce debates around its content, which offer useful insights into the practices and standards of the community that is responsible for creating that entry in Wikipedia. (In some cases, Wikipedia articles start with initial contributions by passionate amateurs, followed by contributions from professional scholars/researchers who weigh in on the “final” versions. Here is where the contested part of the material becomes most usefully evident.) In this open environment, both the content and the process by which it is created are equally visible, thereby enabling a new kind of critical reading—almost a new form of literacy—that invites the reader to join in the consideration of what information is reliable and/or important.
  • Mastering a field of knowledge involves not only “learning about” the subject matter but also “learning to be” a full participant in the field. This involves acquiring the practices and the norms of established practitioners in that field or acculturating into a community of practice.
  • But viewing learning as the process of joining a community of practice reverses this pattern and allows new students to engage in “learning to be” even as they are mastering the content of a field.
  • Another interesting experiment in Second Life was the Harvard Law School and Harvard Extension School fall 2006 course called “CyberOne: Law in the Court of Public Opinion.” The course was offered at three levels of participation. First, students enrolled in Harvard Law School were able to attend the class in person. Second, non–law school students could enroll in the class through the Harvard Extension School and could attend lectures, participate in discussions, and interact with faculty members during their office hours within Second Life. And at the third level, any participant in Second Life could review the lectures and other course materials online at no cost. This experiment suggests one way that the social life of Internet-based virtual education can coexist with and extend traditional education.
  • Digital StudyHall (DSH), which is designed to improve education for students in schools in rural areas and urban slums in India. The project is described by its developers as “the educational equivalent of Netflix + YouTube + Kazaa.”11 Lectures from model teachers are recorded on video and are then physically distributed via DVD to schools that typically lack well-trained instructors (as well as Internet connections). While the lectures are being played on a monitor (which is often powered by a battery, since many participating schools also lack reliable electricity), a “mediator,” who could be a local teacher or simply a bright student, periodically pauses the video and encourages engagement among the students by asking questions or initiating discussions about the material they are watching.
  • John King, the associate provost of the University of Michigan
  • For the past few years, he points out, incoming students have been bringing along their online social networks, allowing them to stay in touch with their old friends and former classmates through tools like SMS, IM, Facebook, and MySpace. Through these continuing connections, the University of Michigan students can extend the discussions, debates, bull sessions, and study groups that naturally arise on campus to include their broader networks. Even though these extended connections were not developed to serve educational purposes, they amplify the impact that the university is having while also benefiting students on campus.14 If King is right, it makes sense for colleges and universities to consider how they can leverage these new connections through the variety of social software platforms that are being established for other reasons.
  • The project’s website includes reports of how students, under the guidance of professional astronomers, are using the Faulkes telescopes to make small but meaningful contributions to astronomy.
  • “This is not education in which people come in and lecture in a classroom. We’re helping students work with real data.”16
  • HOU invites students to request observations from professional observatories and provides them with image-processing software to visualize and analyze their data, encouraging interaction between the students and scientists
  • The site is intended to serve as “an open forum for worldwide discussions on the Decameron and related topics.” Both scholars and students are invited to submit their own contributions as well as to access the existing resources on the site. The site serves as an apprenticeship platform for students by allowing them to observe how scholars in the field argue with each other and also to publish their own contributions, which can be relatively small—an example of the “legitimate peripheral participation” that is characteristic of open source communities. This allows students to “learn to be,” in this instance by participating in the kind of rigorous argumentation that is generated around a particular form of deep scholarship. A community like this, in which students can acculturate into a particular scholarly practice, can be seen as a virtual “spike”: a highly specialized site that can serve as a global resource for its field.
  • I posted a list of links to all the student blogs and mentioned the list on my own blog. I also encouraged the students to start reading one another's writing. The difference in the writing that next week was startling. Each student wrote significantly more than they had previously. Each piece was more thoughtful. Students commented on each other's writing and interlinked their pieces to show related or contradicting thoughts. Then one of the student assignments was commented on and linked to from a very prominent blogger. Many people read the student blogs and subscribed to some of them. When these outside comments showed up, indicating that the students really were plugging into the international community's discourse, the quality of the writing improved again. The power of peer review had been brought to bear on the assignments.17
  • for any topic that a student is passionate about, there is likely to be an online niche community of practice of others who share that passion.
  • Finding and joining a community that ignites a student’s passion can set the stage for the student to acquire both deep knowledge about a subject (“learning about”) and the ability to participate in the practice of a field through productive inquiry and peer-based learning (“learning to be”). These communities are harbingers of the emergence of a new form of technology-enhanced learning—Learning 2.0—which goes beyond providing free access to traditional course materials and educational tools and creates a participatory architecture for supporting communities of learners.
  • We need to construct shared, distributed, reflective practicums in which experiences are collected, vetted, clustered, commented on, and tried out in new contexts.
  • An example of such a practicum is the online Teaching and Learning Commons (http://commons.carnegiefoundation.org/) launched earlier this year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching
  • The Commons is an open forum where instructors at all levels (and from around the world) can post their own examples and can participate in an ongoing conversation about effective teaching practices, as a means of supporting a process of “creating/using/re-mixing (or creating/sharing/using).”20
  • The original World Wide Web—the “Web 1.0” that emerged in the mid-1990s—vastly expanded access to information. The Open Educational Resources movement is an example of the impact that the Web 1.0 has had on education.
  • But the Web 2.0, which has emerged in just the past few years, is sparking an even more far-reaching revolution. Tools such as blogs, wikis, social networks, tagging systems, mashups, and content-sharing sites are examples of a new user-centric information infrastructure that emphasizes participation (e.g., creating, re-mixing) over presentation, that encourages focused conversation and short briefs (often written in a less technical, public vernacular) rather than traditional publication, and that facilitates innovative explorations, experimentations, and purposeful tinkerings that often form the basis of a situated understanding emerging from action, not passivity.
  • In the twentieth century, the dominant approach to education focused on helping students to build stocks of knowledge and cognitive skills that could be deployed later in appropriate situations. This approach to education worked well in a relatively stable, slowly changing world in which careers typically lasted a lifetime. But the twenty-first century is quite different.
  • We now need a new approach to learning—one characterized by a demand-pull rather than the traditional supply-push mode of building up an inventory of knowledge in students’ heads. Demand-pull learning shifts the focus to enabling participation in flows of action, where the focus is both on “learning to be” through enculturation into a practice as well as on collateral learning.
  • The demand-pull approach is based on providing students with access to rich (sometimes virtual) learning communities built around a practice. It is passion-based learning, motivated by the student either wanting to become a member of a particular community of practice or just wanting to learn about, make, or perform something. Often the learning that transpires is informal rather than formally conducted in a structured setting. Learning occurs in part through a form of reflective practicum, but in this case the reflection comes from being embedded in a community of practice that may be supported by both a physical and a virtual presence and by collaboration between newcomers and professional practitioners/scholars.
  • The building blocks provided by the OER movement, along with e-Science and e-Humanities and the resources of the Web 2.0, are creating the conditions for the emergence of new kinds of open participatory learning ecosystems23 that will support active, passion-based learning: Learning 2.0.
  • As a graduate student at UC-Berkeley in the late 1970s, Treisman worked on the poor performance of African-Americans and Latinos in undergraduate calculus classes. He discovered the problem was not these students’ lack of motivation or inadequate preparation but rather their approach to studying. In contrast to Asian students, who, Treisman found, naturally formed “academic communities” in which they studied and learned together, African-Americans tended to separate their academic and social lives and studied completely on their own. Treisman developed a program that engaged these students in workshop-style study groups in which they collaborated on solving particularly challenging calculus problems. The program was so successful that it was adopted by many other colleges. See Uri Treisman, “Studying Students Studying Calculus: A Look at the Lives of Minority Mathematics Students in College,” College Mathematics Journal, vol. 23, no. 5 (November 1992), pp. 362–72, http://math.sfsu.edu/hsu/workshops/treisman.html.
  • In the early 1970s, Stanford University Professor James Gibbons developed a similar technique, which he called Tutored Videotape Instruction (TVI). Like DSH, TVI was based on showing recorded classroom lectures to groups of students, accompanied by a “tutor” whose job was to stop the tape periodically and ask questions. Evaluations of TVI showed that students’ learning from TVI was as good as or better than in-classroom learning and that the weakest students academically learned more from participating in TVI instruction than from attending lectures in person. See J. F. Gibbons, W. R. Kincheloe, and S. K. Down, “Tutored Video-tape Instruction: A New Use of Electronics Media in Education,” Science, vol. 195 (1977), pp. 1136–49.
Debra Hicks

feedly: a more social and magazine-like start page - 0 views

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    Feedly. A more social and magazine-like start page for firefox 3! [Flock-like for Firefox]
harry deasy

How to Identify a Valentino Shoes - 0 views

image

Valentino Shoes

started by harry deasy on 10 Apr 16 no follow-up yet
Keith Hamon

Intro Open Ed Syllabus - OpenContent Wiki - 0 views

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    The goals of the course are (1) to give you a firm grounding in the current state of the field of open education, including related topics like copyright, licensing, and sustainability, (2) to help you locate open education in the context of mainstream instructional technologies like learning objects, and (3) to get you thinking, writing, and dialoguing creatively and critically about current practices and possible alternative practices in open education
David Wetzel

Top 5 Search Tools for Finding Flickr Images for Use in Education - 0 views

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    The top five search tools for finding Flickr images are designed to help teachers and students locate just the right image for use in any subject area and project. Without these tools finding the right image on this image hosting site is often an impossible, or at least a tedious, task. The value of this site is its ability to provide digital pictures which are often impossible for a teacher to obtain any other way. Like everything else on the internet, trying to find something is Like trying to find a needle in a haystack. This where the top five search tools become valuable resources for teachers and students trying to find images comes into play. These search engines are specifically designed to search the more than three billion pictures on the Flickr hosting site.
David Wetzel

Tips and Tricks for Finding Science and Math Images on the Web - 0 views

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    Like everything else on the Internet, trying to find images is Like trying to find a needle in a haystack. Without the right tools for finding science and math images on the web it is often an impossible, or at least mind-numbing, task. What is needed are search engines which make the job easier. This is where the tips and tricks provided below help this seemingly impossible task by using the top search Web 2.0 search engines and tools available today. These are valuable resources for both you and your students when trying to find just the right image for lesson or project involving digital media.
Clif Mims

feedscrub - 0 views

shared by Clif Mims on 15 Jan 09 - Cached
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    Feedscrub acts as a spam filter for your RSS feeds. Teach it what you like and don't like. Protect yourself from information overload,
Hanna Wiszniewska

Adolescents Involved With Music Do Better In School - 0 views

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    However, not all adolescents participate in music equally, and certain groups are disadvantaged in access to music education. Families with high socioeconomic status participate more in music than do families with lower socioeconomic status. In addition to social class as a predictor of music participation, ethnicity is also a factor. Asians and Whites are more likely to participate in music than are Hispanics. While young Black children attended concerts with their parents, they were less likely to take music lessons.
LUCIAN DUMA

BLOGGING 2.0 IN XXI CENTURY EDUCATION: I wish you a Christmas with peace my friends and my #edtech20 PLN ; the Birth of Son of God , the reason for Christmas . - 1 views

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    I wish you a Christmas with peace my friends and my #edtech20 PLN ; the Birth of Son of God , the reason for Christmas . I invite you to join #edtech20 facebook page has a new look . Do you like ? If you like please post useful information for teachers related to integrating eSafety of new technologies web 2.0 and social media in education 2.0 . Using #edtech20 hastag http://www.facebook.com/pages/Caransebes-Romania-Dear-members-please-free-to-share-/Web-20-and-new-tehnologies-in-education-still-2010/103495893021586?v=app_186663019975 All the posts will appear on the main page . Let's collaborate and share knowledge toghether also when you join eSafety in #edtech20 PLN http://web20ineducation2010.ning.com/
Dennis OConnor

UW-Stout ELearning and Online Teaching Certificate (Facebook Program Page) - 0 views

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    Here's our new program page on Facebook.  I am updating this page regularly with information for anyone interested in e-learning and online teaching best practices.  You don't have to be a current or former student to take advantage of the information and connections found here.  I do ask you to 'Like' this page if you find it useful.   (Try it! You'll Like It!)
xampfeed85

Final proof aliens exist? They have discovered ancient hieroglyphic-like carvings on Mars. - 0 views

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    Footage of Nasa images, taken by its Curiosity Rover, show the writing on a rock, according to and alien researchers and conspiracy theorists who are convinced it proves there was once an ancient civilisation on Mars, much like those on Earth.
titechnologies

Reasons why React Native Is the Future of Hybrid App Development - TI Technologies - 0 views

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    As the world of mobile apps is expanding beyond comprehension, demand for better and faster apps shoot up. We need applications that perform easily, have a magnificent look, simple to create, and can be implemented rapidly. All these necessities are difficult to satisfy as high performance, related to native apps, set aside enough time for the advancement. Then again, faster deployment, related with cross-platform applications, trade-off, no less than a bit, on performance. Therefore, aching for better languages, tools that help top-notch hybrid apps development, and frameworks keep developers on their toes. One such resolution, which quickly changing the universe of versatile applications is Facebook's React Native. It is a JavaScript library to assemble a UI that enables you to make versatile mobile applications and work easily as native apps. It even gives you a chance to reuse the code over the web and mobile platforms. You don't have to develop for Android and iOS, independently, as one code is sufficient for both the platforms, saving money and time. Let's look at some reasons that point towards React Native taking the center stage in the future. Supports Both iOS & Android - 'Supportive' Because of the two different operating systems which are majorly being used by the customers across the world, the primary challenge for the mobile app development companies is to choose one ahead of the other. But Facebook made it easy by introducing React Native. It supports both iOS and Android making it convenient for the app developers to use the same code for both the platforms without writing it from the scratch. Reusability for better development What makes us to state that REACTS is the eventual fate of application development? It is the reusability of the components. You don't have the Web view components anymore for hybrid apps with React native. The essential code for this framework will easily be reused within the native apps, and you'll easily compile it
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5 Ways to Know You Need A Plumber | U'GoPros Inc - 0 views

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    Plumbing Repair Are you looking for a qualified, professional plumbing service provider or emergency plumber near me that knows the latest technological processes for fixing leaks, repairing and replacing plumbing pipes and ensuring your plumbing system is clean and operating normally? If you are, we can help you find the right plumber for your needs. Signs You Need a Plumbing Repair Contractor in Space Coast Florida Plumbing systems in the homes and businesses of Brevard County are often overlooked until they fail and result in the need to shut off your home or business' water until a qualified plumbing contractor can be contacted to locate and repair the problem. Thankfully, there are some signs you can look for to determine if your plumbing system needs a plumber repair or service leak repair before it completely fails, potentially resulting in floods and backed up sewer lines. 1. You Have Limited or No Hot Water Hot water is essential for washing laundry, taking a shower and general cleaning around your home or business. When you don't have hot water or you have very limited hot water, it could mean that you have a problem with the gas or electrical connections to your hot water heater, the hot water heating elements have failed or the inside is filled with debris and corrosion. The good news is that one of our water heater plumbing professionals can diagnose the problem with your water heater and repair it or replace your water heater. 2. More than One Drain is Slow If just one drain is slow, it most likely means there is a clog in that drain that needs to be removed. Drains that commonly clog include sinks, showers and bathtubs, and typically, all it takes is cleaning the clogged drain out with a plumbing snake or auger. However, if you have multiple slow drains or your toilet is backing up into your bathtub, there's a good chance you have a sewer line clog that needs immediate attention. Sewer lines can be safely cleaned out by an experienced plumb
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