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Jeff Johnson

The Bamboo Project Blog: Professional Development Practice: The One Sentence Journal - 0 views

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    Regular readers know that I'm a big fan of reflective practice--one of the greatest values of blogging for me has been that it's created a forum for me to regularly think about what I do and how I do it. But most people aren't ready to make that kind of time commitment so here's something that I think might be a perfect way to encourage reflection in the shortest time possible: the one sentence journal, a great idea from blogger Gretchen Rubin...
Carol VanHook

21st C Literacy Ave Home - 0 views

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    On my blog, mostly geared towards educational thoughts, reflections, and motivations, I am showing examples of mixing various web2.0 tools together. During the summer, I have a form that the reader can complete on summer reading interests. Each Monday, I hope to post a summary of what those participating have shared from around the world. And then, of course comments are welcomed. Thus, this is a real connecting use of the Internet, offering lots of participation and engaging thoughts!
Nik Peachey

Mobile Learning in ELT: Survey 2013 - 0 views

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    Whether you use technology and mobile learning or avoid it please find time to answer these 20 questions and share your ideas, opinions and reflections and I will once again publish the results for all to share.
Gail Casey

Google Apps in School - Week 1 | ICT in my Classroom - 1 views

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    It is great to finally get some of the Google Apps tools in the hands of the children in my year group. I have been thinking about their deployment to support my teaching and learning for a very long time. In this post I reflect on our first full week of
Caroline Roche

My Reflections on TeachMeet Takeover | edte.ch - 17 views

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    Excellent description of the TeachMeet Takeover at Bett this year and the difference it made to class room practice
Nigel Coutts

Handwriting vs Typing - Reflecting on Finland's Changing policy on Cursive Writing - 38 views

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    Finland has attracted attention recently for backing typing skills over cursive handwriting but what does this mean for students.
Joanne Kiernan

Infosearcher - 0 views

  • variety of technical, cognitive, social and emotional skills which users need in order to function effectively in a digital environment.
  • Graphic literacy, Navigation, Context, Skepticism, Focus, Ethical Behavior
  • Graphic literacy – thinking visually
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  • Graphic
  • Graphic literacy
  • Navigation – developing a sense of Internet geography
  • Context – seeing the connections
  • Focus – practicing reflection and deep thinking
  • Skepticism – learning to evaluate information
  • Ethical behavior – understanding the rules of cyberspace
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    Pam Berger's blog. This entry: learning in the Web2.0 world talks about skills to teach students - graphic literacy,navigation, context, skepticism, focus and ethical behavior
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Philippe Scheimann

A Vision of Students Today (& What Teachers Must Do) | Britannica Blog - 0 views

  • It has taken years of acclimatizing our youth to stale artificial environments, piles of propaganda convincing them that what goes on inside these environments is of immense importance, and a steady hand of discipline should they ever start to question it.
    • Russell D. Jones
       
      There is a huge investment in resources, time, and tradition from the teacher, the instutions, the society, and--importantly--the students. Students have invested much more time (proportional to their short lives) in learning how to be skillful at the education game. Many don't like teachers changing the rules of the game just when they've become proficient at it.
  • Last spring I asked my students how many of them did not like school. Over half of them rose their hands. When I asked how many of them did not like learning, no hands were raised. I have tried this with faculty and get similar results. Last year’s U.S. Professor of the Year, Chris Sorensen, began his acceptance speech by announcing, “I hate school.” The crowd, made up largely of other outstanding faculty, overwhelmingly agreed. And yet he went on to speak with passionate conviction about his love of learning and the desire to spread that love. And there’s the rub. We love learning. We hate school. What’s worse is that many of us hate school because we love learning.
    • Russell D. Jones
       
      So we (teachers and students) are willing to endure a little (or a lot) of uncomfortableness in order to pursue that love of learning.
  • They tell us, first of all, that despite appearances, our classrooms have been fundamentally changed.
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  • While most of our classrooms were built under the assumption that information is scarce and hard to find, nearly the entire body of human knowledge now flows through and around these rooms in one form or another, ready to be accessed by laptops, cellphones, and iPods. Classrooms built to re-enforce the top-down authoritative knowledge of the teacher are now enveloped by a cloud of ubiquitous digital information where knowledge is made, not found, and authority is continuously negotiated through discussion and participation. In short, they tell us that our walls no longer mark the boundaries of our classrooms.
  • And that’s what has been wrong all along. Some time ago we started taking our walls too seriously – not just the walls of our classrooms, but also the metaphorical walls that we have constructed around our “subjects,” “disciplines,” and “courses.” McLuhan’s statement about the bewildered child confronting “the education establishment where information is scarce but ordered and structured by fragmented, classified patterns, subjects, and schedules” still holds true in most classrooms today. The walls have become so prominent that they are even reflected in our language, so that today there is something called “the real world” which is foreign and set apart from our schools. When somebody asks a question that seems irrelevant to this real world, we say that it is “merely academic.”
  • We can use them in ways that empower and engage students in real world problems and activities, leveraging the enormous potentials of the digital media environment that now surrounds us. In the process, we allow students to develop much-needed skills in navigating and harnessing this new media environment, including the wisdom to know when to turn it off. When students are engaged in projects that are meaningful and important to them, and that make them feel meaningful and important, they will enthusiastically turn off their cellphones and laptops to grapple with the most difficult texts and take on the most rigorous tasks.
  • At the root of your question is a much more interesting observation that many of the styles of self-directed learning now enabled through technology are in conflict with the traditional teacher-student relationship. I don’t think the answer is to annihilate that relationship, but to rethink it.
  • Personally, I increasingly position myself as the manager of a learning environment in which I also take part in the learning. This can only happen by addressing real and relevant problems and questions for which I do not know the answers. That’s the fun of it. We become collaborators, with me exploring the world right along with my students.
  • our walls, the particular architectonics of the disciplines we work within, provide students with the conversational, narrative, cognitive, epistemological, methodological, ontological, the –ogical means for converting mere information into knowledge.
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    useful article , I need to finish it and look at this 'famous clip' that had 1 million viewers
Cassie Herd

Reflections of a Classroom Teacher: Teachers Learn Too: Developing a PLN - 0 views

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    Links and information about building a PLN
Roland Gesthuizen

The Twitter Trap - NYTimes.com - 0 views

  • my inner worrywart wonders whether the new technologies overtaking us may be eroding characteristics that are essentially human: our ability to reflect, our pursuit of meaning, genuine empathy, a sense of community connected by something deeper than snark or political affinity.
  • “The generation that had information, but no context. Butter, but no bread. Craving, but no longing.”
  • before we succumb to digital idolatry, we should consider that innovation often comes at a price. And sometimes I wonder if the price is a piece of ourselves.
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    "Last week my wife and I told our 13-year-old daughter she could join Facebook. Within a few hours she had accumulated 171 friends, and I felt a little as if I had passed my child a pipe of crystal meth."
Tero Toivanen

The Flipped Class Manifest - THE DAILY RIFF - Be Smarter. About Education. - 40 views

  • "The Flipped Classroom is an intentional shift of content which in turn helps move students back to the center of learning rather than the products of schooling."
  • We are actively transferring the responsibility and ownership of learning from the teacher to the students in a Flipped Classroom. When students have control over how they learn content, the pace of their learning, and how their learning is assessed, the learning belongs to them.  Teachers become guides to understanding rather than dispensers of facts, and students become active learners rather than receptacles of information.
  • The Flipped Classroom is a pedagogy-first approach that strives to meet the needs of the learners in our individual schools and communities.  It is much more an ideology than it is a specific methodology...there is no prescribed set of rules to follow or model to fit.
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  • It's not "record your lecture once" and you're done; it's part of a comprehensive instructional model that includes direct instruction, inquiry, practice, formative and summative assessment and much more. It also allows teachers to reflect on and develop quality and engaging learning opportunities and options for internalization, creation, and application of content rather than just fluff or time filling assignments.
shahbazahmeed

uytuytuy - 0 views

America America America America America America America America America America America America America America America America America America America America America America America America Ameri...

technology web2.0 education

started by shahbazahmeed on 11 May 21 no follow-up yet
chroniclecloud

The Growing Importance of Technology in Education - 0 views

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    The impact of teachers' efforts to switch over technology is a revolution in the making. The education system has transformed overnight, and it will have unprecedented implications on education. The classes will be powered by technology now. The value will be added to the process of learning and less time will be spent on mundane tasks. The experience over the last year should inspire all of us who are involved in education to reflect on our efforts and consider the real impact.
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