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justquestionans

Ashford-University ECE 332 Homework and Assignment Help - 1 views

Get help for Ashford-University ECE 332 Homework and Assignment Help. We provide assignment, homework, discussions and case studies help for all subjects Ashford-University for Session 2017-2018. ...

Early Childhood Education Assignment Help Early Childhood Education Homework Help Early Childhood Education Study Help Early Childhood Education Tutors Help Early Childhood Education Course Help

started by justquestionans on 27 Jun 18 no follow-up yet
Tom March

Shortcuts - New Worries About Children With Cellphones - NYTimes.com - 0 views

  • “Let them know there are rules. There comes a time when parents have to be parents.”
  • One suggestion, she said, is putting a basket out where children place their phones upon arriving home.
  •  
    "Now, about half of American children 12 years and older have cellphones, according to Christopher Collins, a senior analyst for consumer research at the Yankee Group, a research firm. And that has spawned all sorts of problems, like questions about etiquette and costly scams."
  •  
    Good example of the kinds of adjustments "basic parents" make as we learn about making guidelines for technology use with children and teens. Key quote, I think: "Let them know there are rules. There comes a time when parents have to be parents."
Steve Ransom

ScootPad :: Practice. Learn. Succeed. - 29 views

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    Free for teachers, students, parents.
Tero Toivanen

Digital Citizenship | the human network - 0 views

  • The change is already well underway, but this change is not being led by teachers, administrators, parents or politicians. Coming from the ground up, the true agents of change are the students within the educational system.
  • While some may be content to sit on the sidelines and wait until this cultural reorganization plays itself out, as educators you have no such luxury. Everything hits you first, and with full force. You are embedded within this change, as much so as this generation of students.
  • We make much of the difference between “digital immigrants”, such as ourselves, and “digital natives”, such as these children. These kids are entirely comfortable within the digital world, having never known anything else. We casually assume that this difference is merely a quantitative facility. In fact, the difference is almost entirely qualitative. The schema upon which their world-views are based, the literal ‘rules of their world’, are completely different.
  • ...13 more annotations...
  • The Earth becomes a chalkboard, a spreadsheet, a presentation medium, where the thorny problems of global civilization and its discontents can be explored out in exquisite detail. In this sense, no problem, no matter how vast, no matter how global, will be seen as being beyond the reach of these children. They’ll learn this – not because of what teacher says, or what homework assignments they complete – through interaction with the technology itself.
  • We and our technological-materialist culture have fostered an environment of such tremendous novelty and variety that we have changed the equations of childhood.
  • As it turns out (and there are numerous examples to support this) a mobile handset is probably the most important tool someone can employ to improve their economic well-being. A farmer can call ahead to markets to find out which is paying the best price for his crop; the same goes for fishermen. Tradesmen can close deals without the hassle and lost time involved in travel; craftswomen can coordinate their creative resources with a few text messages. Each of these examples can be found in any Bangladeshi city or Africa village.
  • The sharing of information is an innate human behavior: since we learned to speak we’ve been talking to each other, warning each other of dangers, informing each other of opportunities, positing possibilities, and just generally reassuring each other with the sound of our voices. We’ve now extended that four-billion-fold, so that half of humanity is directly connected, one to another.
  • Everything we do, both within and outside the classroom, must be seen through this prism of sharing. Teenagers log onto video chat services such as Skype, and do their homework together, at a distance, sharing and comparing their results. Parents offer up their kindergartener’s presentations to other parents through Twitter – and those parents respond to the offer. All of this both amplifies and undermines the classroom. The classroom has not dealt with the phenomenal transformation in the connectivity of the broader culture, and is in danger of becoming obsolesced by it.
  • We already live in a time of disconnect, where the classroom has stopped reflecting the world outside its walls. The classroom is born of an industrial mode of thinking, where hierarchy and reproducibility were the order of the day. The world outside those walls is networked and highly heterogeneous. And where the classroom touches the world outside, sparks fly; the classroom can’t handle the currents generated by the culture of connectivity and sharing. This can not go on.
  • We must accept the reality of the 21st century, that, more than anything else, this is the networked era, and that this network has gifted us with new capabilities even as it presents us with new dangers. Both gifts and dangers are issues of potency; the network has made us incredibly powerful. The network is smarter, faster and more agile than the hierarchy; when the two collide – as they’re bound to, with increasing frequency – the network always wins.
  • A text message can unleash revolution, or land a teenager in jail on charges of peddling child pornography, or spark a riot on a Sydney beach; Wikipedia can drive Britannica, a quarter millennium-old reference text out of business; a outsider candidate can get himself elected president of the United States because his team masters the logic of the network. In truth, we already live in the age of digital citizenship, but so many of us don’t know the rules, and hence, are poor citizens.
  • before a child is given a computer – either at home or in school – it must be accompanied by instruction in the power of the network. A child may have a natural facility with the network without having any sense of the power of the network as an amplifier of capability. It’s that disconnect which digital citizenship must bridge.
  • Let us instead focus on how we will use technology in fifty years’ time. We can already see the shape of the future in one outstanding example – a website known as RateMyProfessors.com. Here, in a database of nine million reviews of one million teachers, lecturers and professors, students can learn which instructors bore, which grade easily, which excite the mind, and so forth. This simple site – which grew out of the power of sharing – has radically changed the balance of power on university campuses throughout the US and the UK.
  • Alongside the rise of RateMyProfessors.com, there has been an exponential increase in the amount of lecture material you can find online, whether on YouTube, or iTunes University, or any number of dedicated websites. Those lectures also have ratings, so it is already possible for a student to get to the best and most popular lectures on any subject, be it calculus or Mandarin or the medieval history of Europe.
  • As the university dissolves in the universal solvent of the network, the capacity to use the network for education increases geometrically; education will be available everywhere the network reaches. It already reaches half of humanity; in a few years it will cover three-quarters of the population of the planet. Certainly by 2060 network access will be thought of as a human right, much like food and clean water.
  • Educators will continue to collaborate, but without much of the physical infrastructure we currently associate with educational institutions. Classrooms will self-organize and disperse organically, driven by need, proximity, or interest, and the best instructors will find themselves constantly in demand. Life-long learning will no longer be a catch-phrase, but a reality for the billions of individuals all focusing on improving their effectiveness within an ever-more-competitive global market for talent.
  •  
    Mark Pesce: Digital Citizenship and the future of Education.
Tero Toivanen

Music and the Brain - 0 views

  • A little known fact about Einstein is that when he was young he did extremely poor in school. His grade school teachers told his parents to take him out of school because he was "too stupid to learn" and it would be a waste of resources for the school to invest time and energy in his education. The school suggested that his parents get Albert an easy, manual labor job as soon as they could.
  • Instead of following the school's advice, Albert's parents bought him a violin. Albert became good at the violin. Music was the key that helped Albert Einstein become one of the smartest men who has ever lived. Einstein himself says that the reason he was so smart is because he played the violin. He loved the music of Mozart and Bach the most. A friend of Einstein, G.J. Withrow, said that the way Einstein figured out his problems and equations was by improvising on the violin.
  • Another example of how rhythm orders movement is an autistic boy who could not tie his shoes. He learned how on the second try when the task of tying his shoes was put to a song. The rhythm helped organize his physical movements in time.
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  • Classical music from the baroque period causes the heart beat and pulse rate to relax to the beat of the music. As the body becomes relaxed and alert, the mind is able to concentrate more easily. Furthermore, baroque music decreases blood pressure and enhances the ability to learn. Music affects the amplitude and frequency of brain waves, which can be measured by an electro-encephalogram. Music also affects breathing rate and electrical resistance of the skin. It has been observed to cause the pupils to dilate, increase blood pressure, and increase the heart rate.
  • Mozart's music and baroque music, with a 60 beats per minute beat pattern, activate the left and right brain. The simultaneous left and right brain action maximizes learning and retention of information. The information being studied activates the left brain while the music activates the right brain. Also, activities which engage both sides of the brain at the same time, such as playing an instrument or singing, causes the brain to be more capable of processing information.
  • According to The Center for New Discoveries in Learning, learning potential can be increased a minimum of five times by using this 60 beats per minute music.
  • Dr. Lozanov's system involved using certain classical music pieces from the baroque period which have around a 60 beats per minute pattern. He has proven that foreign languages can be learned with 85-100% efficiency in only thirty days by using these baroque pieces. His students had a recall accuracy rate of almost 100% even after not reviewing the material for four years.
  • Group 1 was read the words with Handel's Water Music in the background. They were also asked to imagine the words. Group 2 was read the same words also with Handel's Water Music in the background. Group 2 was not asked to imagine the words. Group 3 was only read the words, was not given any background music, and was also not asked to imagine the words. The results from the first two tests showed that groups 1 and 2 had much better scores than group 3. The results from the third test, a week later, showed that group 1 performed much better than groups 2 or 3.
  • One simple way students can improve test scores is by listening to certain types of music such as Mozart's Sonata for Two Piano's in D Major before taking a test. This type of music releases neurons in the brain which help the body to relax.
  • William Balach, Kelly Bowman, and Lauri Mohler, all from Pennsylvania State University, studied the effects of music genre and tempo on memory retention. They had four groups learn vocabulary words using one of four instrumental pieces - slow classical, slow jazz, fast classical, and fast jazz.
  • Surprisingly, the results showed that changing the genre had no effect on recall but changing the tempo decreased recall.
  • One key ingredient to the order of music from the baroque and classical periods is math. This is realized by the body and the human mind performs better when listening to this ordered music.
  • George recognized that Saul overcame his problems by using special music. With this story in mind King George asked George Frederick Handel to write some special music for him that would help him in the same way that music helped Saul. Handel wrote his Water Music for this purpose.
  • Dr. Ballam goes on to say that, "The human mind shuts down after three or four repetitions of a rhythm, or a melody, or a harmonic progression."
  • Bob Larson, a Christian minister and former rock musician, remembers that in the 70's teens would bring raw eggs to a rock concert and put them on the front of the stage. The eggs would be hard boiled by the music before the end of the concert and could be eaten. Dr. Earl W. Flosdorf and Dr. Leslie A. Chambers showed that proteins in a liquid medium were coagulated when subjected to piercing high-pitched sounds
  • Rock music was played in one of the boxes while Bach's music was played in the other box. The rats could choose to switch boxes through a tunnel that connected both boxes. Almost all of the rats chose to go into the box with the Bach music even after the type of music was switched from one box to the other.
  • She found that the plants grew well for almost every type of music except rock and acid rock. Jazz, classical, and Ravi Shankar turned out to be the most helpful to the plants. However, the plants tested with the rock music withered and died. The acid rock music also had negative effects on the plant growth.
  • One cannot deny the power of music. High school students who study music have higher grade point averages that those who don't. These students also develop faster physically. Student listening skills are also improved through music education. The top three schools in America all place a great emphasis on music and the arts. Hungary, Japan, and the Netherlands, the top three academic countries in the world, all place a great emphasis on music education and participation in music. The top engineers from Silicon Valley are all musicians. Napoleon understood the enormous power of music. He summed it up by saying, "Give me control over he who shapes the music of a nation, and I care not who makes the laws" .
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    Mozart's music and baroque music, with a 60 beats per minute beat pattern, activate the left and right brain. The simultaneous left and right brain action maximizes learning and retention of information. The information being studied activates the left brain while the music activates the right brain. Also, activities which engage both sides of the brain at the same time, such as playing an instrument or singing, causes the brain to be more capable of processing information.
Cheska Lorena

Teach Parents Tech - 15 views

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    Google launched TeachParentsTech.org, a little spin-off web site that features 50 how-to videos, all designed to answer your parents' basic tech questions. Your father wants to know how to share a big file? Your mother is trying to figure out how to bookmark a web page? Simply head to TeachParentsTech.org, find the appropriate how-to video, send it via email, then free up time to teach yourself more heavy-duty tech.
Jonathan Wylie

Internet Safety Sites for Parents - 0 views

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    Internet safety is an important issue that is relevant to all parents today. However, finding the best advice and keeping up with the latest threats can be very time consuming. Thankfully, there are lots of great websites that can do the hard work for you.
Martin Burrett

'Teaching' Technology by @sansanananana - 0 views

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    "As a technology teacher, I always keep looking for new tools to excite my students. During parent-teacher conferences, when a parent comes and asks me how's their child doing at my subject I almost always say, "Everyone is good at technology" or "All of them love ICT lessons". But when I'm alone, I reflect on these statements many times. If everyone already loves technology and is good at it, then what am I here for? What's my role? This is a generation of digital natives. You show a two-year-old how to scroll through the camera roll of your phone once and they won't ask you again. This makes me question my validity again and again."
Theresa Neuser

Engrade - The Classroom Community - 15 views

  • Engrade is a free set of web-based tools for educators allowing them to manage their classes online while providing parents and students with 24/7 real-time online class information. It's private, secure, truly free, and unbelievably easy to use - so join over 150,000 teachers and start using Engrade today.
  •  
    Engrade is a free set of web-based tools for educators allowing them to manage their classes online while providing parents and students with 24/7 real-time online class information. It's private, secure, truly free, and unbelievably easy to use - so join over 150,000 teachers and start using Engrade today.
dsatkins1981

The Forgotten Childhood: Why Early Memories Fade : Shots - Health News : NPR - 0 views

  • "What we found was that even as young as the second year of life, children had very robust memories for these specific past events,"
  • "Why is it that as adults we have difficulty remembering that period of our lives?"
  • More studies provided evidence that at some point in childhood, people lose access to their early memories.
  • ...12 more annotations...
  • children as old as 7 could still recall more than 60 percent of those early events
  • children who were 8 or 9 recalled less than 40 percent.
  • we observed was actually the onset of childhood amnesia,"
  • still not entirely clear why early memories are so fragile
  • Some early memories are more likely than others to survive childhood amnesia
  • One example, she says, is a memory that carries a lot of emotion.
  • "They want to be cooperative," she says, "so you have to be very careful not to put words in their mouth."
    • dsatkins1981
       
      It seems that any role that an adult plays in helping to re-tell, frame, and contextualize a memory in order to bring it to the surface or to make it last must be gentle and organic. We're not talking about rote memorization of past events - can you imagine the trauma from that at home or school let alone in a court room? Some things you wouldn't want to remember.
  • Another powerful determinant of whether an early memory sticks is whether a child fashions it into a good story, with a time and place and a coherent sequence of events, Peterson says. "Those are the kinds of memories that are going to last," she says.
  • And it turns out parents play a big role in what a child remembers, Peterson says. Research shows that when a parent helps a child give shape and structure and context to a memory, it's less likely to fade away.
  • At first, he just talked about it with her.
    • dsatkins1981
       
      Talking through and eventually encouraging writing about past events - preferably pleasant memories - seems like a great way to help students build a repository of lasting childhood remembrances. I can recall my Mom and Dad saying things like, "We had a great day today didn't we? We got up so early! Didn't Dad make an excellent breakfast? Eggs and bacon. That bacon was so crispy. Don't you think that the smell of a good breakfast cooking makes it easier to get up?" Just an example, and I included the kind of leading questions a lawyer would want to avoid if this was about more than breakfast, but my folks were inviting we the children to enter the conversation as a valued part of the kind of reminiscing that adults may do after a nice day. It was just conversation but I can remember loads of them. And there was plenty of time for us to respond and share.
  • school writing assignments.
  • when our own memories start to fail, Peterson says, we rely on family members, photo albums and videos to restore them.
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    How studying childhood amnesia is leading to changes in the way we think about brain development, learning, and memory --- this article mentions implications in the home and in the courts but it also seems relevant to the classroom
BTerres

5 Innovative Classroom Management Tools for Teachers - 0 views

  • attendance taking, lesson planning, grading and parental communications is
  • a big part of the job.
  • With help from the many online services and mobile apps designed for teachers, it can be easy to efficiently organize and complete classroom management responsibilities.
  • ...11 more annotations...
  • Digital Gradebook: SchoolCircuit
  • online gradebook easy to access for parents and students, and easy to manage for teachers. By assigning access codes to create accounts, teachers can give students and their parents the ability to check grades, attendance and assignments, as well as messages from the teacher and upcoming events.
  • Another similar free option is Engrade,
  • Create and Grade Quizes: ClassMarker
  • teachers can use ClassMaker to make online assessments that are graded instantly. Teachers can choose between five different formats including essay responses (obviously excluded from the “instant grading” feature). They can also randomize test questions and set time limits.
  • For $25 per year, teachers can remove advertising and also have access to e-mailed results, overall question percentages, overall quiz results percentages and learner score averages.
  • Manage Lesson Plans: PlanbookEdu
  • a free, online lesson plan book that functions much like a paper book with a couple of important exceptions. First, since it is cloud-based, it’s impossible to forget at home or at school. It also makes customizing and editing easier, and each box functions much like its own tiny text pad.
  • The capability to easily share plans with substitute teachers, colleagues and administrators — probably the biggest advantage — comes only with the $20 per year premium version.
  • Take Attendance: Attendance for iPhone
  • $4.99 app
milesmorales

The Best Educational Tool: The Idea Board - 1 views

Many parents want to spend more time with their kids, but don't always know what to do. Parents needs something that can help educate their kids, that is where The Idea Board comes in. The Idea Boa...

started by milesmorales on 08 Aug 14 no follow-up yet
Betsy Morris

WB_CE_Dig_Portfolios.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 0 views

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    A digital portfolio is a computer-based collection of student performance over time. Portfolios make classroom learning more accessible to parents, administrators, and other district support staff because they provide a window into student learning. A portfolio showcases both student achievement and student learning over time.
Martin Burrett

Mad4Maths - 0 views

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    A superb cartoon based maths site with areas for parents, teachers and kids. Play fun multiplication and time activities. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Maths
yc c

Mizuko Ito on Why Time Spent Online Is Important for Teen Development - MacArthur Foundation - 11 views

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    It might surprise parents to learn that it is not a waste of time for their teens to hang out online," says Mizuko Ito, University of California, Irvine researcher and the lead author of the most extensive U.S. study to date on teens and their use of digital media. The study showed that America's youth are developing important social and technical skills online often in ways adults do not understand or value.
Peter Horsfield

Peyton Robertson - Extraordinary People Changing the Game - 0 views

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    Peyton Robertson began inventing at the age of eight. He's been brought up by his parents to think of solutions to problems rather than complain about them. By the time he turned 12 years old, Peyton has won first place in Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge for inventing Sandless Operational Sandbag (SOS). His invention is a lot lighter than conventional sandbags, more intuitively designed to avoid seawater or floodwater from seeping in, and 100% reusable. Once totally dried after use, the SOS can just be stored for future flood emergencies. To read more about Peyton Robertson visit www.thextraordinary.org
Peter Horsfield

Extraordinary People - Liz Murray - 0 views

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    Elizabeth "Liz" Murray's childhood was riddled with drugs, alcohol, and poverty. It's the kind of childhood that corrupts and molds a problem citizen. Fortunately, Liz did not turn out like her parents. She strove to break the cycle of hopelessness that ran in their family for generations. Despite being homeless, Liz completed high school in two years, won a New York Times scholarship, and made it to Harvard. Now, she inspires people as a motivational speaker and chairs her own company, Manifest Living. As soon as her life got better, she reached out to those who need help.
Don Lourcey

The Power of Potential: 19 Educational Uses for Google Wave | SoYouWantToTeach.Com - 42 views

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    Departmental communications Intercampus Plan parent conferences with multiple teachers and multiple schedules Share links to web resources Campus improvement planning Schoolwide calendar/scheduling Faculty meeting follow-up Teacher appraisal sign-ups To-do lists Keep information current between work, cell, and home School newspaper/newsletter article development Local newspaper publicity article development Twitter-like communication between faculty without the Twitter-like time drain Share lesson plans with substitutes/administrators/department chairs/other teachers
Carlos Quintero

Engrade Online Gradebook - 0 views

  •  
    Engrade is a free set of web-based tools for educators allowing them to manage their classes online while providing parents and students with 24/7 real-time online class information. It's private, secure, truly free, and unbelievably easy to use - so join over 50,000 teachers and start using Engrade today.
Greg Brandenburg

edublogs: Ken Robinson's The Element: reincarnating creativity - 1 views

  • We also need to recognise that, largely, those teachers who use technology the most effectively and lead the way with its use are also, by and large, excellent teachers with or without the technology.This helps us see what many of us appreciate already: the one biggest element of improving education, making learning more creatively inclined and entrepreneurial, is the teacher. It's not curriculum, class sizes (though smaller class sizes make the teacher's life easier) or even assessment. This is something I've been reporting back from research for two years (and which I've been blown out on more times than I can count). It's not about letting students lead the way with technology and "show us teachers" how it's done. Students are generally quite narrow in their knowledge of how to harness technology or creative venture.No, it's how teachers and parents teach that is important. It is, to use a piece of edu-jargon, pedagogy, both at school and at home.
    • Sheri Edwards
       
      Pedagogy Innovation Creativity Understanding Entrepreneurship PICUE
  • with students batched by age and subject to standardised tests for quality before shipping to the real world. Conformity has thus always had a higher value than diversity
    • Greg Brandenburg
       
      I've not objected to standardized tests as there needs to be some accountability. But, when you put it this way, it does sound like the education factory.
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    We also need to recognise that, largely, those teachers who use technology the most effectively and lead the way with its use are also, by and large, excellent teachers with or without the technology. This helps us see what many of us appreciate already: the one biggest element of improving education, making learning more creatively inclined and entrepreneurial, is the teacher. It's not curriculum, class sizes (though smaller class sizes make the teacher's life easier) or even assessment. This is something I've been reporting back from research for two years (and which I've been blown out on more times than I can count). It's not about letting students lead the way with technology and "show us teachers" how it's done. Students are generally quite narrow in their knowledge of how to harness technology or creative venture. No, it's how teachers and parents teach that is important. It is, to use a piece of edu-jargon, pedagogy, both at school and at home.
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