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Tero Toivanen

Minding the Planet: Web 3.0 -- The Best Official Definition Imaginable - 0 views

  • Web 3.0, in my opinion is best defined as the third-decade of the Web (2009 - 2019), during which time several key technologies will become widely used. Chief among them will be RDF and the technologies of the emerging Semantic Web. While Web 3.0 is not synonymous with the Semantic Web (there will be several other important technology shifts in that period), it will be largely characterized by semantics in general.
  • Why is defining Web 3.0 as a decade of time better than just about any other possible definition of the term? Well for one thing, it's a definition that can't easily be co-opted by any company or individual around some technology or product. It's also a completely unambiguous definition -- it refers to a particular time period and everything that happens in Web technology and business during that period. This would end the debate about what the term means and move it to something more useful to discuss: What technologies and trends will actually become important in the coming decade of the Web?
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    Web 3.0 -- The Best Official Definition Imaginable Web 3.0, in my opinion is best defined as the third-decade of the Web (2009 - 2019), during which time several key technologies will become widely used.
J Black

The 21st Century Centurion: 21st Century Questions - 0 views

  • The report extended literacy to “Five New Basics” - English, mathematics, science, social studies, and computer science. A Nation At Risk specified that all high school graduates should be able to “understand the computer as an information, computation and communication device; students should be able to use the computer in the study of the other Basics and for personal and work-related purposes; and students should understand the world of computers, electronics, and related technologies."That was 1983 - twenty- six years ago. I ask you, Ben: Has education produced students with basic knowledge in the core disciplines and computer science TODAY? Are we there yet? OR - are we still at risk for not producing students with the essential skills for success in 1983?
    • J Black
       
      I had never really considered this before...how computer science has been totally left out of the equaltion....why is that? Cost of really delivering this would be enormous -- think how much money the districts would have to pour into the school systems.
  • On June 29, 1996, the U. S. Department of Education released Getting America's Students Ready for the 21st Century; Meeting the Technology Literacy Challenge, A Report to the Nation on Technology and Education. Recognizing the rapid changes in workplace needs and the vast challenges facing education, the Technology Literacy Challenge launched programs in the states that focused on a vision of the 21st century where all students are “technologically literate.” Four goals, relating primarily to technology skills, were advanced that focused specifically on: 1.) Training and support for teachers; 2.) Acquisition of multimedia computers in classrooms; 3.) Connection to the Internet for every classroom; and 4.) Acquiring effective software and online learning resources integral to teaching the school's curriculum.
    • J Black
       
      we are really stuck here....the training and support -- the acquisition of hardware, connectivity etc.
  • Our profession is failing miserably to respond to twenty-six years of policy, programs and even statutory requirements designed to improve the ability of students to perform and contribute in a high performance workplace. Our students are losing while we are debating.
    • J Black
       
      This is really, really well said here...bravo
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  • In 2007, The Report of the NEW Commission on the Skills of the American Workforce: Tough Choices or Tough Times made our nation hyperaware that "World market professionals are available in a wide range of fields for a fraction of what U.S. professionals charge." Guess what? While U.S. educators stuck learned heads in the sand, the world's citizens gained 21st century skills! Tough Choices spares no hard truth: "Our young adults score at “mediocre” levels on the best international measure of performance." Do you think it is an accident that the word "mediocre" is used? Let's see, I believe we saw it w-a-a-a-y back in 1983 when A Nation At Risk warned of a "tide of mediocrity." Tough Choices asks the hard question: "Will the world’s employers pick U.S. graduates when workers in Asia will work for much less? Then the question is answered. Our graduates will be chosen for global work "only if the U.S. worker can compete academically, exceed in creativity, learn quickly, and demonstrate a capacity to innovate." There they are
    • J Black
       
      This is exactly what dawns on students when they realize what globalization means for them..the incredibly stiff competition that it is posed to bring about.
  • “Learning is what most adults will do for a living in the 21st century."
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    The report extended literacy to "Five New Basics" - English, mathematics, science, social studies, and computer science. A Nation At Risk specified that all high school graduates should be able to "understand the computer as an information, computation and communication device; students should be able to use the computer in the study of the other Basics and for personal and work-related purposes; and students should understand the world of computers, electronics, and related technologies." That was 1983 - twenty- six years ago. I ask you, Ben: Has education produced students with basic knowledge in the core disciplines and computer science TODAY? Are we there yet? OR - are we still at risk for not producing students with the essential skills for success in 1983?
Russell D. Jones

Putting Technology in Its Place - Lesson Plans Blog - NYTimes.com - 0 views

  • I rarely grade alone. The students rarely do their homework in isolation. The same chatting software that, when mismanaged, give us fits in our classrooms, enables us to collaborate in dynamic ways. Students now continue fiery classroom debates when they get home from school. They now walk each other through difficult readings of “The Odyssey” and “Hamlet” and return to class with stronger understandings
    • Russell D. Jones
       
      Social Learning
  • it is more crucial that they learn how to sift thoughtfully through increasing amounts of information.
  • The issue now is distinguishing between rich resources and the online collection of surface facts, misinformation, and inexcusable lies that masquerade as the truth. It will be hard for our students to be thoughtful citizens without this ability to discern the useful from the irrelevant. This is especially clear during this election season. If they are never asked to practice dealing with this new onslaught of information, they will have to practice when the stakes are much higher.
    • Russell D. Jones
       
      Another comment about information literacy and the value of information literacy.
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    Using Technology in the classroom and the social learning environment
Sheri Edwards

Leading Scholar's U-Turn on School Reform Shakes Up Debate - NYTimes.com - 10 views

  • Arthur E. Levine, a former president of Teachers College, where Dr. Ravitch got her doctorate and began her teaching career in the 1970s. “Now for her to suddenly conclude that she’s been all wrong is extraordinary — and not very helpful.”
  • In 2005, she said, a study she undertook of Pakistan’s weak and inequitable education system, dominated by private and religious institutions, convinced her that protecting the United States’ public schools was important to democracy.
  • She remembers another date, Nov. 30, 2006, when at a Washington conference she heard a dozen experts conclude that the No Child law was not raising student achievement.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Testing had become not just a way to measure student learning, but an end in itself.
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    "Testing had become not just a way to measure student learning, but an end in itself. "
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    New View -- Expert changes her mind
Tero Toivanen

12 Findings on Mind, Brain & Education | Getting Smart - 24 views

  • Students’ brains continuously adapt to the environments where they live and work.  As students learning in these places, these experiences gradually sculpt the architecture of the brain.
  • Students’ genetic predispositions interact with learning experiences to give rise to a wide range of individual differences.
  • Students learning English as a second language are processing written information in somewhat different ways than native English speakers so standard reading instruction techniques may not be the right fit for their needs.
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  • Education should give students opportunities to practice setting goals, tracking progress toward them, adjusting strategies along the way, and assessing outcomes.
  • Emotions direct students’ learning processes, helping them gravitate toward positive situations and away from negative ones.
  • Mathematics is at least partially dissociable from other cognitive domains and abilities within the domain of mathematics can be dissociable from one another.
  • Education can support the development of emotional regulation skills, and this should be a priority as emotional regulation skills strongly predict academic achievement.
  • When students from disadvantaged backgrounds are in high-quality schools, their cortisol levels decrease throughout the day. The better the school, the more the cortisol levels decrease. Therefore, a quality learning environment can help students reach healthy cortisol levels, which lead to better emotional regulation and more favorable learning outcomes.
  • Environments that promote positive relationships and a sense of community promote learning.
  • Providing meaningful learning experiences with ongoing guidance can enable students at all levels to build toward mastery of a common set of skills.
  • This scientific evidence that emotion is fundamental to learning settles longstanding ideological debates concerning whether educators should be responsible for emotional development—if educators are responsible for intellectual development, they are inherently involved in emotional development as well.
  • Student-centered approaches to learning require students to be self-directed and responsible for their own learning, which requires executive functioning skills such as goal setting, planning, and monitoring progress.
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    Important findings!
Roland Gesthuizen

The Creep of Social Media Raises Big Questions - Room for Debate - NYTimes.com - 0 views

  • social media increase the volume and velocity of connections to a point where communicating in anything but online postings seems almost impossible
  • both in our personal and work lives, social media make it easy for us to hide from each other, even as we are constantly connected to each other
  • What is democracy without privacy? What is intimacy without privacy?
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    "Social media won't get less attractive the longer they exist. But we will learn how to use them more wisely. Right now, we're smitten and look away from problems; we behave like young lovers who are afraid that too much talking will spoil the romance. As we grow into a more mature relationship, we'll find time to talk."
Maung Nyeu

Growth in eLearning within UM System causes change, raises concerns - Columbia Missourian - 0 views

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    In University of MIssouri, as online courses and degree offerings increase, the traditional roles of student and teacher are changing. However, some faculty expressed concern that the integrity of academic institutions might be at stake.
Martin Burrett

TrueTube - 0 views

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    This site offers videos on a range of PSHE, citizenship, RE, the environment and other topics. It's a great set of resources for introducing difficult subjects to your class. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/PSHE%2C+RE%2C+Citizenship%2C+Geography+%26+Environmental
Steve Ransom

Principal: 'I was naïve about Common Core' - 32 views

  • The promise of the Common Core is dying and teaching and learning are being distorted.  The well that should sustain the Core has been poisoned.
  • Whether or not learning the word ‘commission’ is appropriate for second graders could be debated—I personally think it is a bit over the top.  What is of deeper concern, however, is that during a time when 7 year olds should be listening to and making music, they are instead taking a vocabulary quiz.
  • The Common Core places an extraordinary emphasis on vocabulary development
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  • Teachers are engaged in practices like these because they are pressured and afraid, not because they think the assessments are educationally sound. Their principals are pressured and nervous about their own scores and the school’s scores. Guaranteed, every child in the class feels that pressure and trepidation as well.
  • I am troubled that a company that has a multi-million dollar contract to create tests for the state should also be able to profit from producing test prep materials. I am even more deeply troubled that this wonderful little girl, whom I have known since she was born, is being subject to this distortion of what her primary education should be.
  • Parents can expect that the other three will be neglected as teachers frantically try to prepare students for the difficult and high-stakes tests.
  • Real learning occurs in the mind of the learner when she makes connections with prior learning, makes meaning, and retains that knowledge in order to create additional meaning from new information.  In short, with tests we see traces of learning, not learning itself.
  • They see data, not children. 
  • Data should be used as a strategy for improvement, not for accountability
  • A fool with a tool is still a fool.  A fool with a powerful tool is a dangerous fool.
María Redondo

Preguntamos...: ¿Y esto para qué me sirve? - 6 views

    • Elena Almazán
       
      A veces me siento perdida como profesora. No se como motivar
  • En primaria es más sencillo hacerles ver el uso de las matemáticas porque todo es cercano a ellos, aun asi ya hay niños que se descuelgan y que empiezan a verle poca utilidad porque "para eso están las calculadoras"
  • Sirve para formar la mente, para desarrollar tus capacidades más allá de sus límites actuales, sirve para que desarrolles una visión propia del mundo a través del conocimiento científico y tus vivencias, que te permita posicionarte como ciudadano formado ante los grandes debates de la sociedad en que vives, sirve para que las generalizaciones y las abstracciones te permitan tomar decisiones razonadas
    • María Redondo
       
      Puede ayudar a responder a la gran pregunta: ¿para qué me sirven las matemáticas?
Nigel Coutts

Why we made homework 'Optional'? - 19 views

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    Of all the topics that can be discussed around Education, homework is possibly the one most likely to cause heated debate. It is either an essential component of learning, the foundation of positive behaviours for learning as an adult or a waste of time and energy that robs students of valuable time with family and friends. But can we make homework something that benefits everyone?
Nigel Coutts

Education: Competition vs Collaboration - 24 views

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    In a time where much of the debate around education is linked to performance on national and international assessments such as PISA, TIMMS, PIRLS and in Australia, NAPLAN combined with calls for market-driven reforms there is a danger that a climate of competition between schools and systems will grow.
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