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Luciano Ferrer

Open edX | Open Courseware Development Platform - 0 views

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    "EdX is a nonprofit online initiative created by founding partners Harvard and MIT and composed of dozens of leading global institutions, the xConsortium. EdX offers interactive online courses and MOOCs from the world's best universities and institutions. Open edX is the open source platform that powers edX courses. Through our commitment to the open source vision, edX code is freely available to the community. Institutions can host their own instances of Open edX and offer their own classes. Educators can extend the platform to build learning tools that precisely meet their needs. And developers can contribute new features to the Open edX platform. Our goal is to build a thriving worldwide community of educators and technologists who share innovative solutions to benefit students everywhere. We invite you to explore Open edX and participate in our growing movement. Frequently Asked Questions What is Open edX? The Open edX platform is a free--and open source--course management system (CMS) that was originally developed by edX. The Open edX platform is used all over the world to host Massive Open Online courses (MOOCs) as well as smaller classes and training modules."
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    "EdX is a nonprofit online initiative created by founding partners Harvard and MIT and composed of dozens of leading global institutions, the xConsortium. EdX offers interactive online courses and MOOCs from the world's best universities and institutions. Open edX is the open source platform that powers edX courses. Through our commitment to the open source vision, edX code is freely available to the community. Institutions can host their own instances of Open edX and offer their own classes. Educators can extend the platform to build learning tools that precisely meet their needs. And developers can contribute new features to the Open edX platform. Our goal is to build a thriving worldwide community of educators and technologists who share innovative solutions to benefit students everywhere. We invite you to explore Open edX and participate in our growing movement. Frequently Asked Questions What is Open edX? The Open edX platform is a free--and open source--course management system (CMS) that was originally developed by edX. The Open edX platform is used all over the world to host Massive Open Online courses (MOOCs) as well as smaller classes and training modules."
Luciano Ferrer

Twitter y educación, ejemplos de uso e ideas. También podés colaborar. Por @_chrishaynes Et al - 0 views

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    1) the ways they currently implement Twitter in their teaching and learning, 2) ideas for future development of Twitter-based assignments and pedagogical practices, and 3) issues concerning the integration of Twitter and other digital media into both traditional and non-traditional pedagogies. Collaborators should feel free to add material to these pages, to comment on existing material, and to share links to relevant external readings and resources. It may be helpful to tag your contributions with your Twitter handle. Collaborators are asked to please respect this space as a forum for open and respectful dialogue and networking. Let's fill up the pages below with great ideas! Share the ways you currently implement Twitter in your teaching and learning: Students in my course New Information Technologies do an "Internet Censorship" project, focused on a specific country. I ask them to follow a journalist who tweets on that country as part of their research to understand the state of Internet freedom in the country they select. -- Lora Since shortly after Twitter was launched, I've experimented with various iterations of "The Twitter Essay," an assignment that has students considering the nature of the "essay" as a medium and how they might do that work within the space of 140 characters. -- Jesse (@Jessifer) In my fully online classes, I've started using Twitter to replace the discussion forum as the central location for student interaction. -- Jesse (@Jessifer) Show Tweets that have gotten people arrested and prompt discussion on whether it is fair that anyone be arrested for any Tweet in the US, who is likely to be arrested for their Tweets, what kinds of Tweets are likely to prompt arrest, etc. Students in my First Year Seminar course "The Irish Imagination: Yeats to Bono" developed a platform for digital annotation of Irish literature. Embedded in their platform was a twitter feed of relevant individuals/groups, m
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    1) the ways they currently implement Twitter in their teaching and learning, 2) ideas for future development of Twitter-based assignments and pedagogical practices, and 3) issues concerning the integration of Twitter and other digital media into both traditional and non-traditional pedagogies. Collaborators should feel free to add material to these pages, to comment on existing material, and to share links to relevant external readings and resources. It may be helpful to tag your contributions with your Twitter handle. Collaborators are asked to please respect this space as a forum for open and respectful dialogue and networking. Let's fill up the pages below with great ideas! Share the ways you currently implement Twitter in your teaching and learning: Students in my course New Information Technologies do an "Internet Censorship" project, focused on a specific country. I ask them to follow a journalist who tweets on that country as part of their research to understand the state of Internet freedom in the country they select. -- Lora Since shortly after Twitter was launched, I've experimented with various iterations of "The Twitter Essay," an assignment that has students considering the nature of the "essay" as a medium and how they might do that work within the space of 140 characters. -- Jesse (@Jessifer) In my fully online classes, I've started using Twitter to replace the discussion forum as the central location for student interaction. -- Jesse (@Jessifer) Show Tweets that have gotten people arrested and prompt discussion on whether it is fair that anyone be arrested for any Tweet in the US, who is likely to be arrested for their Tweets, what kinds of Tweets are likely to prompt arrest, etc. Students in my First Year Seminar course "The Irish Imagination: Yeats to Bono" developed a platform for digital annotation of Irish literature. Embedded in their platform was a twitter feed of relevant individuals/groups, m
Luciano Ferrer

What's Wrong with MOOCs and Why Aren't They Working? - 1 views

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    "there is no live teacher engagement... Currently, just 10 percent of MOOC registrants complete their courses. Where Will MOOCs Be Just Two Years From Now? Within the next two years, MOOCs will quickly evolve from lacking teacher engagement to having a lot of teacher engagement. Right now, it's essentially a model where computers are teaching students. This model is simply not sustainable in the long run without live student-teacher engagement. Teachers are the key that unlocks learning in these courses. They help students resolve issues and problems. Will the biggest change in online education moving forward be putting live teachers at the center of the MOOC (not just on video)? We will know the answer very soon."
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    "there is no live teacher engagement... Currently, just 10 percent of MOOC registrants complete their courses. Where Will MOOCs Be Just Two Years From Now? Within the next two years, MOOCs will quickly evolve from lacking teacher engagement to having a lot of teacher engagement. Right now, it's essentially a model where computers are teaching students. This model is simply not sustainable in the long run without live student-teacher engagement. Teachers are the key that unlocks learning in these courses. They help students resolve issues and problems. Will the biggest change in online education moving forward be putting live teachers at the center of the MOOC (not just on video)? We will know the answer very soon."
Luciano Ferrer

The Tree of Languages Illustrated in a Big, Beautiful Infographic | Open Culture - 0 views

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    "Call it counterintuitive clickbait if you must, but Forbes' Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry made an intriguing argument when he granted the title of "Language of the Future" to French, of all tongues. "French isn't mostly spoken by French people and hasn't been for a long time now," he admits," but "the language is growing fast, and growing in the fastest-growing areas of the world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa. The latest projection is that French will be spoken by 750 million people by 2050. One study "even suggests that by that time, French could be the most-spoken language in the world, ahead of English and even Mandarin." I don't know about you, but I can never believe in any wave of the future without a traceable past. But the French language has one, of course, and a long and storied one at that. You see it visualized in the information graphic above (also available in suitable-for-framing prints!) created by Minna Sundberg, author of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent. "When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor," writes Mental Floss' Arika Okrent. "An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)." Sundberg takes this tree metaphor to a delightfully lavish extreme, tracing, say, how Indo-European linguistic roots sprouted a variety of modern-day living languages including Hindi, Portuguese, Russian, Italian - and, of course, our Language of the Future. The size of the branches and bunches of leaves represent the number of speakers of each language at different times: the likes of English and Spanish have sprouted into mighty vegetative clusters, while others, like, Swedish, Dutch, and Punjabi, assert a more local dominance over their own, separately grown regional branches. Will French's now-modest leaves one day cast a shadow over the w
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    "Call it counterintuitive clickbait if you must, but Forbes' Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry made an intriguing argument when he granted the title of "Language of the Future" to French, of all tongues. "French isn't mostly spoken by French people and hasn't been for a long time now," he admits," but "the language is growing fast, and growing in the fastest-growing areas of the world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa. The latest projection is that French will be spoken by 750 million people by 2050. One study "even suggests that by that time, French could be the most-spoken language in the world, ahead of English and even Mandarin." I don't know about you, but I can never believe in any wave of the future without a traceable past. But the French language has one, of course, and a long and storied one at that. You see it visualized in the information graphic above (also available in suitable-for-framing prints!) created by Minna Sundberg, author of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent. "When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor," writes Mental Floss' Arika Okrent. "An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)." Sundberg takes this tree metaphor to a delightfully lavish extreme, tracing, say, how Indo-European linguistic roots sprouted a variety of modern-day living languages including Hindi, Portuguese, Russian, Italian - and, of course, our Language of the Future. The size of the branches and bunches of leaves represent the number of speakers of each language at different times: the likes of English and Spanish have sprouted into mighty vegetative clusters, while others, like, Swedish, Dutch, and Punjabi, assert a more local dominance over their own, separately grown regional branches. Will French's now-modest leaves one day cast a shadow over the w
juan domingo farnos

All doc students should consider IDT 8500 for Spring 2013 semester - 5 views

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    I just wanted to bring to your attention a doctoral-level course that all students in IDT and ICL should consider for the Spring 2013 semester.  IDT 8500 is referred to as "the writing class" by our students.  The course description says,
    "Students will critique academic research findings and syn
Luciano Ferrer

Small Changes in Teaching: The First 5 Minutes of Class - 0 views

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    "Open with a question or two. Another favorite education writer of mine, the cognitive psychologist Daniel Willingham, argues that teachers should focus more on the use of questions. "The material I want students to learn," he writes in his book Why Don't Students Like School?, "is actually the answer to a question. On its own, the answer is almost never interesting. But if you know the question, the answer may be quite interesting." My colleague Greg Weiner, an associate professor of political science, puts those ideas into practice. At the beginning of class, he shows four or five questions on a slide for students to consider. Class then proceeds in the usual fashion. At the end, he returns to the questions so that students can both see some potential answers and understand that they have learned something that day. What did we learn last time? A favorite activity of many instructors is to spend a few minutes at the opening of class reviewing what happened in the previous session. That makes perfect sense, and is supported by the idea that we don't learn from single exposure to material - we need to return frequently to whatever we are attempting to master.But instead of offering a capsule review to students, why not ask them to offer one back to you?Reactivate what they learned in previous courses. Plenty of excellent evidence suggests that whatever knowledge students bring into a course has a major influence on what they take away from it. So a sure-fire technique to improve student learning is to begin class by revisiting, not just what they learned in the previous session, but what they already knew about the subject matter.Write it down. All three of the previous activities would benefit from having students spend a few minutes writing down their responses. That way, every student has the opportunity to answer the question, practice memory retrieval from the previous session, or surface their prior knowledge - and not just the students most likely to
juan domingo farnos

OLDaily: MOOC 2011: The Massive Open Online Course in Theory and in Practice - 2 views

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    OLDaily: MOOC 2011: The Massive Open Online Course in Theory and in Practice
Javier Carrillo

Coursera Announces Professional Development Courses - 3 views

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    Cursos promovidos por COURSERA e impartidos desde diferentes universidades e instituciones norteamericanas, GRATUITOS, para la formación continúa de docentes
Javier Carrillo

Coursera.org - 1 views

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    Plataforma de formación on-line de carácter internacional y multilingue
Luciano Ferrer

EDpuzzle, agregar preguntas a videos, etc - 4 views

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    Make any video your lesson. Make it work for your unique classroom.
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    "The easiest way to engage your students with videos pick a video, add your magical touch and track your students' understanding Save time Take already existing videos from Youtube, Khan Academy, Crash Course, etc. or upload your own. Engage students easily Enable self-paced learning with interactive lessons, add your voice and questions along the video. Reinforce accountability Know if your students are watching your videos, how many times and see the answers they give."
Luciano Ferrer

Tip Jars: The 5 Best WordPress Donation Plugins That Work | Elegant Themes Blog - 1 views

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    "Give https://wordpress.org/plugins/give/ Seamless Donations https://wordpress.org/plugins/seamless-donations/ Smart Donations https://wordpress.org/plugins/smart-donations/ Total Donations http://codecanyon.net/item/total-donations-for-wordpress/9985487 PayPal Donations https://wordpress.org/plugins/paypal-donations/ Not every WordPress site has products to sell. Although many can turn their blogs into a revenue stream by offering goods and services somewhere in the mix, there are various reasons you might not be in a position to do so. For example, you may not be running a commercial business. You could be managing a non-profit organization or have no current goods or services to monetize. Many designers, writers, and voluntary groups find themselves in this situation and need to explore alternative sources of income. Donations are one of the most common ways to do just that, and they can sometimes even be more effective than ads or sponsored posts. If your readers are ready to put their hands in their pockets, you just need to provide the means. In this article, we've gathered together five of the best WordPress donation plugins to help you make that process simple. Why Use a Tip Jar? At first you might have some reservations about placing a donation button on your website. Some might feel it's in poor taste - as if you're begging your readers for help. Others doubt that it'll work, thinking readers will automatically ignore it. But the truth is that a tip jar is a great way to garner support for your WordPress site. It can provide supplemental income if you're a freelance designer or developer, and the amount brought in over the course of a month or year can offset hosting costs for your website. Furthermore, with the growing use of ad blockers, donations can be more effective than traditional online revenue streams. For startups and non-profit groups, donations are a vital means of funding campaigns. Other sites may choose to use tip jar
Luciano Ferrer

OpenLibra | Problems in Introductory Physics - 0 views

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    "This book is a collection of homework problems for use in an introductory physics course. It is a work in progress, currently complete through mechanics and electromagnetism. There is a complete set of ancillary materials, including solutions and an online answer checker. If you're an instructor, you can use these problems as a plug-in replacement for the ones in a commercial textbook, thus insulating yourself from common hassles associated with using the problems from a commercial text. For example, you can change books without having to redo all your problem sets, or you can tell your students that they can use any edition of a particular text."
Javier Carrillo

Educación y Patrimonio Cultural | Conecta13 - 1 views

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    MOOC, comienza 22 abril "Educación y Patrimonio Cultural Fundamentos, contextos y estrategias didácticas"
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