Skip to main content

Home/ Lo mejor de la Blogosfera Educativa/ Group items matching "Talks" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Luciano Ferrer

TED Talks para emprendedores que no puedes dejar de ver | Shopify - 0 views

  •  
    "Muchas de estas presentaciones, conocidas como TED Talks (Pláticas TED), discuten ideas que son particularmente valiosas para los emprendedores. Yo armé una colección de TED Talks que todos los emprendedores, incluidos los propietarios de tiendas de comercio electrónico, encontrarán interesantes y dignas de consideración. Ya que muchos de los presentadores a continuación han escrito libros, he incluido un link para su compra. Todo el dinero recaudado a través del programa de afiliados de Amazon se donó a Acumen Fund, una organización sin fines de lucro que ayuda a emprendedores en países en desarrollo."
Luciano Ferrer

Twitter y educación, ejemplos de uso e ideas. También podés colaborar. Por @_chrishaynes Et al - 0 views

  •  
    1) the ways they currently implement Twitter in their teaching and learning, 2) ideas for future development of Twitter-based assignments and pedagogical practices, and 3) issues concerning the integration of Twitter and other digital media into both traditional and non-traditional pedagogies. Collaborators should feel free to add material to these pages, to comment on existing material, and to share links to relevant external readings and resources. It may be helpful to tag your contributions with your Twitter handle. Collaborators are asked to please respect this space as a forum for open and respectful dialogue and networking. Let's fill up the pages below with great ideas! Share the ways you currently implement Twitter in your teaching and learning: Students in my course New Information Technologies do an "Internet Censorship" project, focused on a specific country. I ask them to follow a journalist who tweets on that country as part of their research to understand the state of Internet freedom in the country they select. -- Lora Since shortly after Twitter was launched, I've experimented with various iterations of "The Twitter Essay," an assignment that has students considering the nature of the "essay" as a medium and how they might do that work within the space of 140 characters. -- Jesse (@Jessifer) In my fully online classes, I've started using Twitter to replace the discussion forum as the central location for student interaction. -- Jesse (@Jessifer) Show Tweets that have gotten people arrested and prompt discussion on whether it is fair that anyone be arrested for any Tweet in the US, who is likely to be arrested for their Tweets, what kinds of Tweets are likely to prompt arrest, etc. Students in my First Year Seminar course "The Irish Imagination: Yeats to Bono" developed a platform for digital annotation of Irish literature. Embedded in their platform was a twitter feed of relevant individuals/groups, m
  •  
    1) the ways they currently implement Twitter in their teaching and learning, 2) ideas for future development of Twitter-based assignments and pedagogical practices, and 3) issues concerning the integration of Twitter and other digital media into both traditional and non-traditional pedagogies. Collaborators should feel free to add material to these pages, to comment on existing material, and to share links to relevant external readings and resources. It may be helpful to tag your contributions with your Twitter handle. Collaborators are asked to please respect this space as a forum for open and respectful dialogue and networking. Let's fill up the pages below with great ideas! Share the ways you currently implement Twitter in your teaching and learning: Students in my course New Information Technologies do an "Internet Censorship" project, focused on a specific country. I ask them to follow a journalist who tweets on that country as part of their research to understand the state of Internet freedom in the country they select. -- Lora Since shortly after Twitter was launched, I've experimented with various iterations of "The Twitter Essay," an assignment that has students considering the nature of the "essay" as a medium and how they might do that work within the space of 140 characters. -- Jesse (@Jessifer) In my fully online classes, I've started using Twitter to replace the discussion forum as the central location for student interaction. -- Jesse (@Jessifer) Show Tweets that have gotten people arrested and prompt discussion on whether it is fair that anyone be arrested for any Tweet in the US, who is likely to be arrested for their Tweets, what kinds of Tweets are likely to prompt arrest, etc. Students in my First Year Seminar course "The Irish Imagination: Yeats to Bono" developed a platform for digital annotation of Irish literature. Embedded in their platform was a twitter feed of relevant individuals/groups, m
Luciano Ferrer

Ramsey Musallam: 3 rules to spark learning - 0 views

  •  
    Las 3 reglas de @ramusallam: 1 la curiosidad va primero 2 aceptar el desastre 3 practicar la reflexión "It took a life-threatening condition to jolt chemistry teacher Ramsey Musallam out of ten years of "pseudo-teaching" to understand the true role of the educator: to cultivate curiosity. In a fun and personal talk, Musallam gives 3 rules to spark imagination and learning, and get students excited about how the world works. "
  •  
    Las 3 reglas de @ramusallam: 1 la curiosidad va primero 2 aceptar el desastre 3 practicar la reflexión "It took a life-threatening condition to jolt chemistry teacher Ramsey Musallam out of ten years of "pseudo-teaching" to understand the true role of the educator: to cultivate curiosity. In a fun and personal talk, Musallam gives 3 rules to spark imagination and learning, and get students excited about how the world works. "
Francisco Gascón Moya

20 Incredible TED Talks You Should Show Your High School Students | Online College Courses - 10 views

  •  
    TED: Ponencias para cambiar el mundo.
Luciano Ferrer

The Monsters of Education Technology - book/ebook #culturalibre - 1 views

  •  
    "I spent much of 2014 on the road, traveling and speaking extensively about education technology's histories, ideologies, and mythologies. The Monsters of Education Technology is a collection of fourteen of those talks on topics ranging from teaching machines to convivial tools, from ed-tech mansplaining to information justice."
  •  
    "I spent much of 2014 on the road, traveling and speaking extensively about education technology's histories, ideologies, and mythologies. The Monsters of Education Technology is a collection of fourteen of those talks on topics ranging from teaching machines to convivial tools, from ed-tech mansplaining to information justice."
Luciano Ferrer

The Tree of Languages Illustrated in a Big, Beautiful Infographic | Open Culture - 0 views

  •  
    "Call it counterintuitive clickbait if you must, but Forbes' Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry made an intriguing argument when he granted the title of "Language of the Future" to French, of all tongues. "French isn't mostly spoken by French people and hasn't been for a long time now," he admits," but "the language is growing fast, and growing in the fastest-growing areas of the world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa. The latest projection is that French will be spoken by 750 million people by 2050. One study "even suggests that by that time, French could be the most-spoken language in the world, ahead of English and even Mandarin." I don't know about you, but I can never believe in any wave of the future without a traceable past. But the French language has one, of course, and a long and storied one at that. You see it visualized in the information graphic above (also available in suitable-for-framing prints!) created by Minna Sundberg, author of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent. "When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor," writes Mental Floss' Arika Okrent. "An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)." Sundberg takes this tree metaphor to a delightfully lavish extreme, tracing, say, how Indo-European linguistic roots sprouted a variety of modern-day living languages including Hindi, Portuguese, Russian, Italian - and, of course, our Language of the Future. The size of the branches and bunches of leaves represent the number of speakers of each language at different times: the likes of English and Spanish have sprouted into mighty vegetative clusters, while others, like, Swedish, Dutch, and Punjabi, assert a more local dominance over their own, separately grown regional branches. Will French's now-modest leaves one day cast a shadow over the w
  •  
    "Call it counterintuitive clickbait if you must, but Forbes' Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry made an intriguing argument when he granted the title of "Language of the Future" to French, of all tongues. "French isn't mostly spoken by French people and hasn't been for a long time now," he admits," but "the language is growing fast, and growing in the fastest-growing areas of the world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa. The latest projection is that French will be spoken by 750 million people by 2050. One study "even suggests that by that time, French could be the most-spoken language in the world, ahead of English and even Mandarin." I don't know about you, but I can never believe in any wave of the future without a traceable past. But the French language has one, of course, and a long and storied one at that. You see it visualized in the information graphic above (also available in suitable-for-framing prints!) created by Minna Sundberg, author of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent. "When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor," writes Mental Floss' Arika Okrent. "An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)." Sundberg takes this tree metaphor to a delightfully lavish extreme, tracing, say, how Indo-European linguistic roots sprouted a variety of modern-day living languages including Hindi, Portuguese, Russian, Italian - and, of course, our Language of the Future. The size of the branches and bunches of leaves represent the number of speakers of each language at different times: the likes of English and Spanish have sprouted into mighty vegetative clusters, while others, like, Swedish, Dutch, and Punjabi, assert a more local dominance over their own, separately grown regional branches. Will French's now-modest leaves one day cast a shadow over the w
Luciano Ferrer

Eleven Ways to Improve Online Classes - 0 views

  •  
    "It has me thinking about what it would mean to improve online classes. A few ideas come to mind: Use multiple platforms. I'm not against using an LMS as a central hub. However, I think it's valuable to experiment with the types of productivity tools you will actually use outside of a classroom. Use Google Docs to share ideas, create surveys, and ask questions. Use Google Hangouts to meet as a group. Go project-based. I haven't figured this out entirely with my first class but my hope is that we can go fully project-based in the same way that my face-to-face class is. In fact, the asynchronous nature of online classes actually means there is a better potential of creating a project-based culture that mirrors the way people actually work on projects. Make something together. I use a collaboration grid with co-creating and communicating on separate spectrums (x-axis) and multimedia and text on another spectrum (y-axis). This has been an effective way to think through collaborative tools that allow students to co-create. Embrace a synchronous/asynchronous blend: I love using Voxer because students can speak back and forth in the moment. However, if they miss it, they can listen to it later. The same is true of using a Google Hangouts On Air. Make it more connective. We tend to treat online instruction as if it is a linear process and we don't do enough to link things back and forth and connect ideas, resources, discussions and content creation in a seamless, back-and-forth nature. Incorporate multimedia. It's a simple idea, but I create a short video at the beginning of each week and I encourage students to create video and audio as well. This has a way of making things more concrete. There's something deeply human about hearing an actual human voice. I know, crazy, right? Go mobile. I don't simply mean use a smart phone. I mean assign some things that allow students to get out in the world and create videos, snap pictures,
  •  
    "It has me thinking about what it would mean to improve online classes. A few ideas come to mind: Use multiple platforms. I'm not against using an LMS as a central hub. However, I think it's valuable to experiment with the types of productivity tools you will actually use outside of a classroom. Use Google Docs to share ideas, create surveys, and ask questions. Use Google Hangouts to meet as a group. Go project-based. I haven't figured this out entirely with my first class but my hope is that we can go fully project-based in the same way that my face-to-face class is. In fact, the asynchronous nature of online classes actually means there is a better potential of creating a project-based culture that mirrors the way people actually work on projects. Make something together. I use a collaboration grid with co-creating and communicating on separate spectrums (x-axis) and multimedia and text on another spectrum (y-axis). This has been an effective way to think through collaborative tools that allow students to co-create. Embrace a synchronous/asynchronous blend: I love using Voxer because students can speak back and forth in the moment. However, if they miss it, they can listen to it later. The same is true of using a Google Hangouts On Air. Make it more connective. We tend to treat online instruction as if it is a linear process and we don't do enough to link things back and forth and connect ideas, resources, discussions and content creation in a seamless, back-and-forth nature. Incorporate multimedia. It's a simple idea, but I create a short video at the beginning of each week and I encourage students to create video and audio as well. This has a way of making things more concrete. There's something deeply human about hearing an actual human voice. I know, crazy, right? Go mobile. I don't simply mean use a smart phone. I mean assign some things that allow students to get out in the world and create videos, snap pictures,
Luciano Ferrer

Richard Turere: My invention that made peace with lions - 0 views

  •  
    "In the Maasai community where Richard Turere lives with his family, cattle are all-important. But lion attacks were growing more frequent. In this short, inspiring talk, the young inventor shares the solar-powered solution he designed to safely scare the lions away."
Francisco Gascón Moya

TED-Ed | Lessons Worth Sharing - 5 views

  •  
    TED Talks, ahora orientadas a educación. Utiliza las mejores ponencias en tus clases. Use engaging videos on TED-Ed to create customized lessons. You can use, tweak, or completely redo any lesson featured on TED-Ed, or create lessons from scratch based on any video from YouTube.
Luciano Ferrer

Lynda Barry on How the Smartphone Is Endangering Three Ingredients of Creativity: Loneliness, Uncertainty & Boredom - 0 views

  •  
    "She demanded that all participating staff members surrender their phones and other such personal devices. The book you hold in your hands would not exist had high school been a pleasant experience for me… It was on those quiet weekend nights when even my parents were out having fun that I began making serious attempts to make stories in comics form. - Adrian Tomine, introduction to 32 Stories Computer Science Professor Calvin Newport's recent book, Deep Work, posits that all that shallow phone time is creating stress, anxiety, and lost creative opportunities, while also doing a number on our personal and professional lives.Author Manoush Zomorodi's recent TED Talk on how boredom can lead to brilliant ideas, below, details a weeklong experiment in battling smartphone habits, with lots of scientific evidence to back up her findings."
Luciano Ferrer

35 charlas TED sobre educación que todo docente curioso debería ver - 2 views

  •  
    "Un vistazo al directorio de TED nos lleva a las cientos de charlas categorizadas con la etiqueta que aquí más nos importa, la educación. Y sobre ellas hemos realizado una selección de las mejores charlas TED sobre educación que todo docente curioso debería ver, sólo con unos pocos minutos de duración y que son un complemento perfecto para las TED Ed Talks. Desde la creatividad en las escuelas o el por qué debemos traer la programación a las aulas, hasta una escuela "de piratas" o cómo atraer a los chavales al maravilloso mundo de la ciencia. Charlas cortas y directas con un objetivo común: mejorar el mundo de la educación. ..."
Paz Gonzalo

Reflexión blogs Quad | Blog Langwitches - 4 views

  • mejorar la calidad de la escritura del estudiante.
  • observar la curva de aprendizaje del maestr
  • o como participante en el proceso de quad-blogging
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • ¿Qué es lo que nosotros, como un entrenador de alfabetización / coordinador de tecnología, aprender? ¿Cómo apoyamos a la maestra? ¿Qué tipo de " ayuda "se necesitan o desean?
  •  
    Cuatro reflexiones sobre la repercusión que el uso de blogs tiene para estudiantes, profesores y coordinadores. ¿Los profesores que participan activamente en blogs están preparando el escenario y la construcción de una plataforma sólida para su desarrollo profesional continuo y aprendizaje permanente? ¿Los profesores que usan blogs en su aula están aprendiendo a enseñar bajo el prisma del siglo 21? ¿El blog mejora las habilidades de escritura de los estudiantes? ¿Los motiva y compromete? ¿apoya el desarrollo de las habilidades del siglo 21? ¿amplía los contenidos curriculares, objetivos y habilidades?
Luciano Ferrer

John Hunter y el Juego de la Paz Mundial - 1 views

  •  
    "John Hunter pone todos los problemas mundiales en una plancha de contrachapado de 1,20 m por 1,5 m y deja que sus alumnos de nueve años los resuelvan. En TED2011, nos explica cómo se involucran los alumnos en su Juego de la Paz Mundial y por qué las lecciones que éste enseña (siempre de manera sorprendente y espontánea) van más allá de adonde llegan las clases convencionales. "
Luciano Ferrer

Diez fallos que debes evitar en una exposición oral - Blog de Lengua - 1 views

  •  
    "Hablar en público es una experiencia terrorífica para muchas personas. Después de unos cuantos años trabajando con mis estudiantes, me he permitido recoger aquí los diez fallos que más se repiten; por decirlo de alguna forma, el hit parade de los errores garrafales al hablar en público: 1. Olvidarse de la introducción: Empieza presentando el tema y avanzando brevemente el contenido. 2. Preparar material para doce presentaciones (y pretender contarlo): El miedo suele ser a quedarse sin nada que decir. En la práctica suele pasar más bien lo contrario. 3. Hablar demasiado deprisa: ¿Has intentado alguna vez llenar una botella de aceite con un embudo? ¿A que enseguida se sale? Pues lo mismo les pasa a las cabecitas de tu público. 4. Hablar hasta que te retiran la palabra: Nunca llegues a este extremo. Es una de las mayores desgracias de un orador. 5. No vocalizar: Respira profundamente y deja que el aire al salir te vaya marcando el ritmo de la pronunciación. Y no te comas trozos de las palabras: pronuncia cada sonido individual. 6. No mirar al público: Si tú no los miras, ¿cómo quieres que ellos te escuchen? 7. El baile de san Vito: Estate quieto. Planta bien los pies en el suelo y cuenta lo que tengas que contar. 8. Leer: Ni se te ocurra. ¿Para qué quieres la cabeza? Apréndetelo. 9. Contar cosas que no entiendes: Tú no te enteras ¿y pretendes que se enteren los demás? 10. Saltarse la conclusión: Siempre, siempre, siempre recapitula al final recogiendo las ideas más importantes. Son fallos de principiante. No vayas a caer en ellos."
1 - 20 of 29 Next ›
Showing 20 items per page