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Max B

Gray Whale | American Cetacean Society - 0 views

  • baleen whale
  • PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION

    Gray whales have a streamlined body, with a narrow, tapered head. The upper jaw is arched in profile, and slightly overlaps the lower jaw. The rostrum (upper jaw) is dimpled and each of the little depressions contains one stiff hair. There are 2-5 grooves on the ventral throat 5 feet (1.5 m) in length.

    Gray Whale Surface Characteristics
    Surface Characteristics

    COLOR

    The gray whale received its name from the gray patches and white mottling on its dark skin. On the skin are many scratches, scattered patches of white barnacles, and orange whale lice. Newborn calves are dark gray to black, although some may have distinctive white marking

  • Adult males measure 45-46 feet (13.7-14 m) and adult females measure slightly more. Both sexes weigh 30-40 tons (27,200-36,300 kg)
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  • Adult males measure 45-46 feet (13.7-14 m) and adult females measure slightly more. Both sexes weigh 30-40 tons (27,200-36,300 kg
  • Gray whales feed on small crustaceans such as amphipods, and tube worms found in bottom sediments. They feed primarily during the summer months of long daylight hours in the cold Arctic waters of the Bering and Chukchi seas. As a baleen whale, it has a series of 130-180 fringed overlapping plates hanging from each side of the upper jaw, where teeth might otherwise be located. These plates consist of a fingernail-like material called keratin that frays out into fine hairs on the ends inside the mouth next to the tongue. The plates are off-white and about 2-10 inches (5-25 cm) in length. To feed, a whale dives to the bottom, rolls on its side and draws bottom sediments and water into its mouth. As it closes its mouth, water and sediments are expelled through the baleen plates, which trap the food on the inside near the tongue to be swallowed.
  • Gray whales inhabit shallow coastal waters of the eastern North Pacific. The gray whale makes one of the longest of all mammalian migrations, averaging 10,000-14,000 miles (16,000-22,530 km) round trip. In October, the whales begin to leave their feeding grounds in the Bering and Chukchi Seas and head south for their mating and calving lagoons in Baja California, Mexico. The southward journey takes 2-3 months. The whales remain in the lagoons for 2-3 months, allowing the calves to build up a thick layer of blubber to sustain them during the northward migration and keep them warm in the colder waters. The return trip north takes another 2-3 months. Mothers and calves travel very near shore on the northbound migration. There are some individual gray whales that are found year round in the Straits of Juan de Fuca between the State of Washington and Vancouver Island, Canada, and some that are seen during the summer months off the
  • Gray whales inhabit shallow coastal waters of the eastern North Pacific. The gray whale makes one of the longest of all mammalian migrations, averaging 10,000-14,000 miles (16,000-22,530 km) round trip. In October, the whales begin to leave their feeding grounds in the Bering and Chukchi Seas and head south for their mating and calving lagoons in Baja California, Mexico. The southward journey takes 2-3 months. The whales remain in the lagoons for 2-3 months, allowing the calves to build up a thick layer of blubber to sustain them during the northward migration and keep them warm in the colder waters. The return trip north takes another 2-3 months. Mothers and calves travel very near shore on the northbound migration. There are some individual gray whales that are found year round in the Straits of Juan de Fuca between the State of Washington and Vancouver Island, Canada, and some that are seen during the summer months off the northern California coast.
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    " or baleen whale."
Colby L

Search Results - 0 views

  • Status: Near Threatened
Colby L

DOSITS: Beluga Whale - 0 views

Harrison S

BLUE WHALE - EnchantedLearning.com - 0 views

  • GENERAL DESCRIPTION
    The blue whale is the largest animal that ever lived on Earth. It is also the loudest animal on Earth. These enormous mammals eat tiny organisms, like plankton and krill, which they sieve through baleen. They live in pods (small groups). These gray-blue whales have 2 blowholes and a 2-14 inch (5-30 cm) thick layer of blubber.

    Blue whales are rorqual whales, whales that have pleated throat grooves that allow their throat to expand during the huge intake of water during filter feeding. Blue whales have 50-70 throat grooves that run from the throat to mid-body.

  • Blue whales grow to be about 80 feet (25 m) long on average, weighing about 120 tons (109 tonnes). The largest specimen found was a female 94 feet (29 m) long weighing more 174 tons (158 tonnes). The females are larger than males, as with all baleen whales. The largest of the blue whales (150 tons) has a heart that weighs about 1,000 pounds (450 kg) and has 14,000 pounds (6,400 kg) of blood circulating in its body. The heart is about the size of a Volkswagon bug car. A human could crawl through the aorta (a major blood vessel).

  • SKIN, SHAPE AND FINS
    The blue whale's skin is usually blue-gray with white-gray spots. The underbelly has brown, yellow, or gray specks. During the winter in cold waters, diatoms stick to the underbelly, giving it a yellow to silver- to sulfur-colored sheen; they are sometimes called "sulfur bottom."

    They have a very small, falcate (sickle-shaped) dorsal fin that is located near the flukes (tail). Blue whales have long, thin flippers 8 feet long (2.4 m) and flukes that are 25 feet (7.6 m) wide.
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  • DIET AND BALEEN
    Blue whales (like all baleen whales) are seasonal feeders and carnivores that filter feed tiny crustaceans (krill, copepods, etc.), plankton, and small fish from the water. They are gulpers, filter feeders that alternatively swim then gulp a mouthful of plankton or fish - they lunge into dense groups of small sea organisms (krill or tiny fish) with an open mouth. 50 to 70 throat pleats allow the throat to expand a great deal, forming a gular pouch. The water is then forced through the baleen plates hanging from the upper jaw. The baleen catches the food, acting like a sieve.

  • Blue whales are the loudest animals on Earth! Their call reaches levels up to 188 decibels.

  • Orca Packs of killer whales (orcas) have been known to attack and kill young blue whales. Man also hunted blue whales until the International Whaling Commission declared them to be a protected species in 1966 because of a huge decrease in their population.
  • Blue whales live at the surface of the ocean and are found in all the oceans of the world.
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    This is a site that has a ton of good information on blue whales
Stella M

Bowhead whale - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 0 views

  • The bowhead whale has a robust, dark-colored body, no dorsal fin and a strongly bowed lower jaw and narrow upper jaw. Its baleen, the longest of any whale at 3 m (9.8 ft), strains tiny prey from the water. The whale has a massive bony skull which it uses to break through the Arctic ice to breathe. Inuit hunters have reported them surfacing through 60 cm (24 in) of ice. The bowhead whale has paired blowholes that spout a blow 20 feet high. The bowhead may grow up to 14–18 m (46–59 ft) and weigh from 30,000 to 60,000 kg (66,000 to 130,000 lb) in adulthood.[12] It is of comparable size to the three species of right whale. The largest bowhead yet reported was 21.2 m (70 ft) for a giant caught off Spitsbergen, Norway. This specimen was later estimated to have weighed approximately 133 t (290,000 lb).[13] Females are larger than males. Its blubber is the thickest of any animal, averaging 43–50 cm (17–20 in).

    Arctic bowhead whales have lost a significant portion of their genetic diversity in the past 500 years. Hundreds of DNA samples from living whales and from baleen used in vessels, toys and housing materialFragmented sentence. Bowheads crossed ice-covered inlets and straits to exchange genes between Atlantic and Pacific populations. This conclusion derived from analyzing maternal lineage using mitochondrial DNA, most likely because of whaling and climatic cooling between the 16th and 19th centuries — known as the Little Ice Age — which reduced the whales’ summer habitat.[14]

    [edit] Life history

Colby L

BELUGA WHALE - 0 views

  • Belugas live in frigid Arctic and sub-Arctic waters, but some populations migrate south to warmer water in the summer.
Colby L

Beluga Whale | American Cetacean Society - 0 views

  • a medium-size toothed whale,
  • The beluga's body is thick, muscular, and tapered at both ends, with a small head and a narrow caudal peduncle (tail stock). Its head is rounded, and it has a short beak and a prominent, protruding forehead called the "melon". The beluga's neck is narrower than the necks of other whales, and it also differs from most whales — whose neck vertebrae are fused — in that its 7 neck vertebrae are free, which allows it to nod and turn its head.
  • Adult belugas are almost completely white. Calves are dark gray ; they become lighter in color with age and at full maturity they become white, though they retain some dark color on the edge of the flippers and flukes.
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  • The beluga's diet is varied, and consists of small squid, crabs, clams, shrimp, sandworms, and various kinds of fish such as capelin, sandlance, and polar and arctic cod. It is especially fond of young salmon, and groups of belugas sometimes gather at the mouths of rivers to feed on the salmon as they return from their fresh water spawning grounds to the sea. A beluga consumes 50-60 pounds of food a day. It has about 10 conical shaped teeth on each side of its upper and lower jaw. Because it swallows its food whole, the beluga's teeth are not used for chewing, but for grasping and holding prey.
Maureen Tumenas

Grade 4 French - 0 views

shared by Maureen Tumenas on 04 Apr 13 - No Cached
  • Dear 4th grade students and families,  Here’s a wonderful video of the 4th grade French students describing their homemade “nature t-shirts.”  The project was designed to encourage them to work more deeply with the nature and seasons vocabulary that we’ve been learning.   I couldn’t have been happier with the results.  The t-shirts were a smashing success – each one an original, colorful, delightful creation.  Have a look!
Maureen Tumenas

Fourth Grade - 0 views

  • omeroom:

    Homeroom teachers: Mrs. Pitcher-Hoffman and Mr. Uhas

    Enter your email address in the box at right to receive up-to-the moment email updates from all fourth grade classes. Or, click on any class on the list at left to visit individual class blogs.

    You can click on the icon at the bottom right (looks like this to subscribe to this calendar. You may also use the ical address to add the calendar to outlook, iphones, etc. All changes, updates appear immediately when posted. You may be able set up mobile or computer notifications of changes and updates.

Harrison S

Nickelodeon | Kids Games, Kids Celebrity Video, Kids Shows | Nick.com - 0 views

shared by Harrison S on 04 Apr 13 - Cached
  •  
    Awesome website
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