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Molly Kellogg

What's All This Talk about Rigor? - 0 views

    • Molly Kellogg
       
      This all adds up to good teaching!  I don't think each description defines rigor since there is more to an effective learning experience than just the rigor, but I certainly agree with all of descriptors in the left column!  I think they're really describing best practices in teaching and learning, so rigor is connected to things like engagement, relevance, student-centered work, open-ended problems, critical thinking skills, accessibility, and high expectations for everyone.
  • Rigor involves all partners in teaching and learning.
    • Molly Kellogg
       
      Very important point - I agree!  Students, teachers and other thinkers involved in a learning experience have a shared responsibility to create and maintain the correct environment for rigorous learning.
  • encourage productive struggling.
  • ...10 more annotations...
  • A rigorous lesson embraces the messiness of a good mathematics task and the deep learning that it has the potential to achieve.
    • Molly Kellogg
       
      YES, YES!!!  Bring on the productive struggle and messy learning!!!  That is what learning is like in real life and that is what we need to provide for our students or they will never truly learn to be critical thinkers, independent problem solvers or inventive thinkers!
  • persist
  • reflect
  • take responsibility
  • ask productive questions
  • teachers
  • preserving the challenge of the task!
  • rigorous formative assessment
    • Molly Kellogg
       
      Absolutely - this is how we learn to differentiate for students throughout the learning experience.
  • When selecting tasks, teachers must be sure that mathematical ideas are explicit and the connections are clear
  • Professional development experiences
    • Molly Kellogg
       
      How can we shape our professional development opportunities to invite more rigor for staff to enrich their learning and to serve as a model for their teaching?
David Pearl

Educational Leadership:Teaching for the 21st Century:Why Creativity Now? A Conversation... - 0 views

  • Really, creativity is a disciplined process that requires skill, knowledge, and control.
    • Molly Kellogg
       
      And we need to include kids in the process of creativity - what structure do they naturally follow? Have them use Bloom's taxonomy to mull over the process of creativity. What is the difference between a wild idea that is outside of the box and a wild idea that is totally out of the realm of possibility? Once the kids establish a process and structure for creative thinking, they can also begin to fill their tool kit with creative thinking tools, like SCAMPER and reverse brainstorming.
    • Annie Ouimet
       
      Three creatvity misconceptions: *only about special people *only about special activities *is about letting go
  • we're going to need every ounce of ingenuity, imagination, and creativity to confront these problems.
    • Molly Kellogg
       
      What else can we do to bring the focus in our school onto the vital importance of creativity and innovation?
  • ...11 more annotations...
  • "We need people who can be innovative, who can think differently."
  • At the moment, instead of promoting creativity, I think we're systematically educating it out of our kids.
    • Annie Ouimet
       
      I'm not sure about this...there has to be a balance I have said for years that we need more time in school
  • America is now facing the biggest challenge it's ever faced—to maintain it's position in the world economies. All these things demand high levels of innovation, creativity, and ingenuity. At the moment, instead of promoting creativity, I think we're systematically educating it out of our kids.
    • Molly Kellogg
       
      See Ken Robinson's talk on how schools kill creativity for more on this; I think this is an opportunity to look at all of the amazing things we do in our schools already to encourage creativity and innovation and then to figure out how to expand those things rather than to feel singled out as a cause of creativity's demise.
  • And when you find things you're good at, you tend to get better at everything because your confidence is up and your attitude is different.
    • Annie Ouimet
       
      This idea needs to be bottled and distributed to every educator...confidence is the key to learning
    • Molly Kellogg
       
      Giving kids the chance to find their passion is the most empowering and exciting gift that we can give them!
  • A policy for creativity in education needs to be about everybody, not just a few.
    • Cathy Wolinsky
       
      How do we give students assignments so that they are responding with creativity and not just following directions?
  • We know this because human culture is so diverse and rich—and our education system is becoming increasingly dreary and monotonous
    • Molly Kellogg
       
      We MUST differentiate, differentiate, differentiate - our learning environments, our teaching styles, our materials, our content and our processes to avoid this stiffling conformity. Isn't diversity envigorating?!
    • David Pearl
       
      I agree
  • It's no surprise to me that so many kids are pulling out of it.
    • Molly Kellogg
       
      The number of kids who check out or actually drop out of school is alarming - a noticable portion of whom are gifted learners. This really concerns me.
  • This is one of the great skills we have to promote and teach—collaborating and benefiting from diversity rather than promoting homogeneity. We have a big problem at the moment—education is becoming so dominated by this culture of standardized testing, by a particular view of intelligence and a narrow curriculum and education system, that we're flattening and stifling some of the basic skills and processes that creative achievement depends on.
  • So there's no doubt in my mind that collaboration, diversity, the exchange of ideas, and building on other people's achievements are at the heart of the creative process. An education that focuses only on the individual in isolation is bound to frustrate some of those possibilities.
  • The regime of standardized testing has led us all to believe that if you can't count it, it doesn't count. Actually, in every creative approach some of the things we're looking for are hard, if not impossible, to quantify. But that doesn't mean they don't matter. When I hear people say, "Well, of course, you can't assess creativity," I think, "You can—just stop and think about it a bit."
    • Molly Kellogg
       
      This is where the value of standards based education becomes clear. I want to use meaty criteria based on student actions and products to assess learning and growth, not numbers and letters. Both my students and I can most effectively assess creativity and innovation by using criteria embedded in content standards. For example, a student can look at their brainstorming notes, organized ideas, idea development work and product creation materials to determine whether they have taken their knowledge all the way up to the top of Bloom's Taxonomy. Have they generated multiple ideas to respond to the guiding question or problem? Have they made connections between ideas to generate new thoughts? Have they piggybacked off others' ideas to create new ones? Have they organized their ideas, explored the logistics behind them and selected the best one for the situation? Have them woven their best idea into new content mastery to apply their knowledge in an innovative way? To me a student reflection around these types of questions is a much more authentic and valuable means of assessment that any attempt to put a numerical value on creativity.
    • David Pearl
       
      The Float
Catie Wooten

Educational Leadership:Literacy 2.0:Plagiarism in the Internet Age - 8 views

  • Teachers who wish to prevent plagiarism should devote extensive instruction to the component tasks of writing from sources.
    • Emily Davison
       
      I tell my students to use their own words but perhaps I should model this directly with them.
    • Caitlin Ruthman
       
      I sort of model this when I give exemplars for projects in which writing in their own words is part of a rubric. I'm not sure that is enough, however. I think maybe my writing doesn't sound enough like their writing in all cases
  • This instruction should focus on the supposedly simple technique of summarizing sources, which is in truth not simple. Many students are far from competent at summarizing an argument— and students who cannot summarize are the students most likely to plagiarize.
    • Caitlin Ruthman
       
      This strikes me as someting teachers in many learning areas could work on with kids rather than defaulting to Language Arts as the place where kids learn about plagiarism
  • The teacher in this tale uses the incident to teach students that using others' words without attribution is a serious crime. He then emphasizes to students the importance of citation and source integration techniques and enlists the school librarian to model how to cite outside works used in a piece of writing.
    • Caitlin Ruthman
       
      I'm not sure that I see the evil/missteps in this example. It doesn't say the student was punished it says the teacher & librarian used it as an opportunity to teach about proper attribution...
  • ...45 more annotations...
  • alternative final projects like creating a brochure
    • Caitlin Ruthman
       
      In the are of copy and paste alternative assessments like these aren't plagiarism-proof
    • Amy Sanders
       
      Testing reply to Caitlin's post.
  • K–16 teachers must spend more time teaching students how to read critically and how to write about their sources.
    • Emily Davison
       
      I agree.
    • Stephen Fox
       
      Ditto
  • Such instruction might begin with techniques of paraphrase.
    • alan hall
       
      What happened to the sticky that I had written here?
    • alan hall
       
      Don, are you out there in cyberspace somewhere?
    • Emily Davison
       
      I'm here
    • Stephen Fox
       
      Hello Emily
    • Don Simms
       
      I'm here now
  • A writer who works only at the sentence level must always quote or paraphrase.
    • Stephen Fox
       
      Interesting concept
  • Educators should also communicate why writing is important. Through writing, people learn, communicate with one another, and discover and establish their own authority and identity.
    • Don Simms
       
      Being able to write about things that you are passionate about will bring even more importance to students' writing.
  • it is easy for well-intentioned students to overlook the boundaries between what they themselves have produced and what they have slid from one screen (their Internet browser) to another (their word-processed document)
    • Sara Petrovek
       
      groovy
    • alan hall
       
      Hi Sara. We're glad to see that you exist.
  • She begins by explaining that inserting synonyms is not paraphrasing. She then guides students in studying a passage and identifying its key words and main ideas that must be retained to paraphrase the passage. Shirley shows her students poor paraphrases of the passage for them to critique. Finally, she has them write their own paraphrase of a 50- to 100-word source passage that they themselves choose.
    • Stephen Fox
       
      Methodology for NOT plagarizing
  • Many students are far from competent at summarizing an argument— and students who cannot summarize are the students most likely to plagiarize.
    • David Pearl
       
      This is the main point
  • This instruction should focus on the supposedly simple technique of summarizing sources, which is in truth not simple.
    • David Pearl
       
      This is important
  • <td style="width: 200px;" valign="top"><!-- BEGIN Right Column Area --> <div id="rightColumn"> <!-- BEGIN SignIn --> <div id="dnn_SignIn"><a name="898"></a><div id="dnn_ctr898_ContentPane" class="DNNAlignleft"><!-- Start_Module_898 --><div id="dnn_ctr898_ModuleContent"> <script type="text/javascript"> function CheckKaLogin() { if (getQuerystring('kalogin') != "") { window.location.href = window.location.href.replace('?kalogin=1', ''); } } function getQuerystring(key, default_) { if (default_==null) default_=""; key = key.replace(/[\[]/,"\\\[").replace(/[\]]/,"\\\]"); var regex = new RegExp("[\\?&]"+key+"=([^&#]*)"); var qs = regex.exec(window.location.href); if(qs == null) return default_; else return qs[1]; } window.onload = function() { if (getQuerystring('kalogin') != "" ) { // window.location.href = window.location.href.replace('?kalogin=1', ''); //alert('kalogin'); } } </script> <div style="overflow: hidden; width: 100%; height: 41px; display: block; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 228);"> <div id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_lblTitle" style="font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-size: 13px; line-height: 43px; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; -x-system-font: none; color: rgb(57, 55, 55); font-weight: bold; margin-left: 10px;">MEMBER SIGN IN</div> </div> <div style="background-color: rgb(250, 250, 242);"> <iframe id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_kaLoginIFrame" src="#" frameborder="0" height="0" width="0"></iframe> <iframe id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_ssoFrame" src="" frameborder="0" height="0" width="0"></iframe> </div> <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(196, 195, 195); background-color: rgb(250, 250, 242); padding-bottom: 20px;"> <div class="section1"> <div id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_divLogin" class="section1"> <div class="vspacer10px"></div> <div class="text11x12black"><span id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_lblUserName">Username or Customer ID</span><br> <input name="dnn$ctr898$ViewLoginModule$txtUserName" id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_txtUserName" size="15" style="width: 130px;" onkeypress="javascript:clickButtonOnEnter(event,'dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_btnSignIn')" type="text"> <div class="vspacer10px"></div> <span id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_lblPassword">Password</span><br> <input name="dnn$ctr898$ViewLoginModule$txtPassword" id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_txtPassword" size="15" style="width: 130px;" onkeypress="javascript:clickButtonOnEnter(event,'dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_btnSignIn')" type="password"> <div class="vspacer10px"></div> <input onclick="__doPostBack('dnn$ctr898$ViewLoginModule$btnSignIn','')" name="dnn$ctr898$ViewLoginModule$btnSignIn" id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_btnSignIn" value="Sign In" type="button"> <br> <div class="vspacer10px"></div> <div id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_lblLink1" class="text10x12black"><a style="font-size: 9px;" href="/customer_service.aspx">Forgot your Username or Password?</a></div> <br> <div id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_lblfailloginmessage" class="text10x12black" align="center"> </div> </div> </div> <div id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_lblLink2" class="signinoption1" align="center"><a href="/membership.aspx">JOIN ASCD</a> <span class="signinoption2">&nbsp;|&nbsp;<a href="/membership/Learn_More_-_Benefits/Membership_Benefits/Member_Benefits.aspx">MEMBER BENEFITS</a></span> </div> <div style="display: block; padding-bottom: 7px; padding-top: 7px; font-size: 11px;"> <a id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_registerEdge" href="http://www.ascd.org/ProfileRegistration.aspx">Register for ASCD Edge</a> </div> <div> <div style="margin: 0pt; font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-size: 13px; line-height: 43px; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; -x-system-font: none; color: rgb(57, 55, 55); font-weight: bold;"> </div> <div style="margin: 0pt;"> &nbsp; </div> <div class="vspacer20px"></div> <div style="display: block; padding-bottom: 7px; font-size: 11px;"> </div> <div style="display: block; padding-bottom: 7px; font-size: 11px;"> </div> <div style="display: block; padding-bottom: 7px; font-size: 11px;"> </div> <div style="display: block; padding-bottom: 7px; font-size: 11px;"> </div> <div style="display: block; padding-bottom: 7px; font-size: 11px;"> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 7px; font-size: 11px; display: none;"> </div> <div class="vspacer10px"></div> <div style="float: right;" class="signinoption2"> </div> </div> </div> <script t
  • A student who plagiarizes is undermining his or her community's ethics, jeopardizing his or her authority, and erasing his or her identity. That student is missing an opportunity to become a better researcher and writer and is probably not learning whatever the assignment was designed to teach.
    • Stephen Fox
       
      Rationales NOT to plagarize - but do students understand or care?
  • Many of us must first learn methods of online research ourselves. We know the principles of good research, but we may not be experienced in applying those principles to an online environment, and we can't assume that students are, either.
  • Plagiarism in the Internet Age
    • Emily Davison
       
      Why don't students read this article as a springboard to a class discussion around plagiarism? Or, is there another, more student friendly article around plagiarism?
  • Teachers warn students not to copy—or else—and present them with citation guides and the trinity of techniques to write using others' research without plagiarizing: quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing. The onus then falls on the students, who are expected to use these techniques well, assuming that they know how to do so
  • With well-practiced paraphrasing skills, students are ready to work on summarizing.
  • many have come to regard the Internet itself as a culprit in students' plagiarism. Some teachers go so far as to forbid students from researching online, in the mistaken assumption that if students are working from hard-copy sources only, the problem will disappear.
  • <td style="width: 200px;" valign="top"><!-- BEGIN Right Column Area --> <div id="rightColumn"> <!-- BEGIN SignIn --> <div id="dnn_SignIn"><a name="898"></a><div id="dnn_ctr898_ContentPane" class="DNNAlignleft"><!-- Start_Module_898 --><div id="dnn_ctr898_ModuleContent"> <script type="text/javascript"> function CheckKaLogin() { if (getQuerystring('kalogin') != "") { window.location.href = window.location.href.replace('?kalogin=1', ''); } } function getQuerystring(key, default_) { if (default_==null) default_=""; key = key.replace(/[\[]/,"\\\[").replace(/[\]]/,"\\\]"); var regex = new RegExp("[\\?&]"+key+"=([^&#]*)"); var qs = regex.exec(window.location.href); if(qs == null) return default_; else return qs[1]; } window.onload = function() { if (getQuerystring('kalogin') != "" ) { // window.location.href = window.location.href.replace('?kalogin=1', ''); //alert('kalogin'); } } </script> <div style="overflow: hidden; width: 100%; height: 41px; display: block; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 228);"> <div id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_lblTitle" style="font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-size: 13px; line-height: 43px; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; -x-system-font: none; color: rgb(57, 55, 55); font-weight: bold; margin-left: 10px;">MEMBER SIGN IN</div> </div> <div style="background-color: rgb(250, 250, 242);"> <iframe id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_kaLoginIFrame" src="#" frameborder="0" height="0" width="0"></iframe> <iframe id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_ssoFrame" src="" frameborder="0" height="0" width="0"></iframe> </div> <div style="border-bottom: 1px solid rgb(196, 195, 195); background-color: rgb(250, 250, 242); padding-bottom: 20px;"> <div class="section1"> <div id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_divLogin" class="section1"> <div class="vspacer10px"></div> <div class="text11x12black"><span id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_lblUserName">Username or Customer ID</span><br> <input name="dnn$ctr898$ViewLoginModule$txtUserName" id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_txtUserName" size="15" style="width: 130px;" onkeypress="javascript:clickButtonOnEnter(event,'dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_btnSignIn')" type="text"> <div class="vspacer10px"></div> <span id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_lblPassword">Password</span><br> <input name="dnn$ctr898$ViewLoginModule$txtPassword" id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_txtPassword" size="15" style="width: 130px;" onkeypress="javascript:clickButtonOnEnter(event,'dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_btnSignIn')" type="password"> <div class="vspacer10px"></div> <input onclick="__doPostBack('dnn$ctr898$ViewLoginModule$btnSignIn','')" name="dnn$ctr898$ViewLoginModule$btnSignIn" id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_btnSignIn" value="Sign In" type="button"> <br> <div class="vspacer10px"></div> <div id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_lblLink1" class="text10x12black"><a style="font-size: 9px;" href="/customer_service.aspx">Forgot your Username or Password?</a></div> <br> <div id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_lblfailloginmessage" class="text10x12black" align="center"> </div> </div> </div> <div id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_lblLink2" class="signinoption1" align="center"><a href="/membership.aspx">JOIN ASCD</a> <span class="signinoption2">&nbsp;|&nbsp;<a href="/membership/Learn_More_-_Benefits/Membership_Benefits/Member_Benefits.aspx">MEMBER BENEFITS</a></span> </div> <div style="display: block; padding-bottom: 7px; padding-top: 7px; font-size: 11px;"> <a id="dnn_ctr898_ViewLoginModule_registerEdge" href="http://www.ascd.org/ProfileRegistration.aspx">Register for ASCD Edge</a> </div> <div> <div style="margin: 0pt; font-family: Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-size: 13px; line-height: 43px; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; -x-system-font: none; color: rgb(57, 55, 55); font-weight: bold;"> </div> <div style="margin: 0pt;"> &nbsp; </div> <div class="vspacer20px"></div> <div style="display: block; padding-bottom: 7px; font-size: 11px;"> </div> <div style="display: block; padding-bottom: 7px; font-size: 11px;"> </div> <div style="display: block; padding-bottom: 7px; font-size: 11px;"> </div> <div style="display: block; padding-bottom: 7px; font-size: 11px;"> </div> <div style="display: block; padding-bottom: 7px; font-size: 11px;"> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 7px; font-size: 11px; display: none;"> </div> <div class="vspacer10px"></div> <div style="float: right;" class="signinoption2"> </div> </div> </div> <script t
  • designing plagiarism-proof assignments that spell out how works should be cited and that include personal reflection and alternative final projects like creating a brochure;
  • This instruction should focus on the supposedly simple technique of summarizing sources, which is in truth not simple. Many students are far from competent at summarizing an argument— and students who cannot summarize are the students most likely to plagiarize.
  • Students don't need threats; students need pedagogy.
  • undermining his or her community's ethics, jeopardizing his or her authority, and erasing his or her identity
  • Educators should also communicate why writing is important.
  • students don't know how to find good sources online, they will enter a search term in Google and look only at the first few sources that come up. Consulting only general sources, and therefore going no deeper than a general understanding of the topic, students "can't think of any other way to say it,
  • begin with Wikipedia but then guide them in how to find more varied, deeper sources of information using library databases such as EBSCO, LexisNexis, or ProQuest to verify Wikipedia's claims.
  • none of the 18 papers contained any summary of the overall argument of a source.
  • none of them used fresh language
  • A writer who works only at the sentence level must always quote or paraphrase.
  • Teachers often forget how difficult summarizing another writer's argument is.
  • Such instruction might begin with techniques of paraphrase
  • She begins by explaining that inserting synonyms is not paraphrasing
  • How much unattributed copying from online sources, for example, derives from poor source selection?
  • students who cannot summarize are the students most likely to plagiarize.
    • David Pearl
       
      This is the key point
  • assumption that if students are working from hard-copy sources only, the problem will disappear.
    • David Pearl
       
      This is the key point
  • We believe that an approach far different from either warnings and punishment or attempts to curtail online research is warranted. Teachers who wish to prevent plagiarism should devote extensive instruction to the component tasks of writing from sources. This instruction should focus on the supposedly simple technique of summarizing sources, whic

    • David Pearl
       
      This is cool.
  • ally plagiarizing since at least the 19th century. Doris Dant's 1986 survey of high school students, conducted well before the Internet became a cultural phenomenon, confirms this finding: Eighty percent of the high sc
    • Caitlin Ruthman
       
      Emily- is this making an email for you?
  • The solution is teaching skills, not vilifying the Internet.
    • Emily Davison
       
      Caitlin, stop vilifying the Internet!
  • We believe that an approach far different from either warnings and punishment or attempts to curtail online research is warranted. Teachers who wish to prevent pla

    • David Pearl
       
      Very very very cool



  • March 2009 | Volume 66 | Number 6
    Literacy 2.0    Pages 64-67

    Plagiarism in the Internet Age

    Rebecca Moore Howard and Laura J. Davies

    Using sources with integrity is complex. The solution is teaching skills, not vilifying the Internet.


    Many teachers see plagiarism as a simple, black-and-white issue. Teachers often bring up the topic at the beginning of a research paper unit, discuss it in one classroom period, and never say the word plagiarism again unless students are caught copying, when this term is dragged out once more to accuse and punish the guilty. Teachers warn students not to copy—or else—and present them with citation guides and the trinity of techniques to write using others' research without plagiarizing: quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing. The onus then falls on the students, who are expected to use these techniques well, assuming that they know how to do so.

    In an age when students gravitate to online sources for research—and when tremendous amounts of both reputable and questionable information are available online—many have come to regard the Internet itself as a culprit in students' plagiarism. Some teachers go so far as to forbid students from researching online, in the mistaken assumption that if students are working from hard-copy sources only, the problem will disappear.

    We believe that an approach far different from either warnings and punishment or attempts to curtail online research is warranted. Teachers who wish to prevent plagiarism should devote extensive instruction to the component tasks of

    • David Pearl
       
      I love this idea
  • Many teachers see plagiarism as a simple, black-and-white issue. Teachers often bring up the topic at the beginning of a research paper unit, discuss it in one classroom period, and never say the word plagiarism again unless students are caught copying, when this term is dragged out once more to accuse and punish the g
    • David Pearl
       
      The key
  • Discuss intellectual property and what it means to "own" a text.
    • Emily Davison
       
      This is a floating sticky note. Wow, fun!
  • ts gravitate to online sources for research—and
    • Amy Sanders
       
      I'm cool
  • coauthored articl
    • Catie Wooten
       
      Coauthored articles might help with plagiarism in classes.
  • If we fail to teach these skills, our students will always be in peril of plagiarism,
    • Catie Wooten
       
      Isn't this the message we all need to hear?
Molly Kellogg

Educational Leadership:Teaching for the 21st Century:Taking the Digital Plunge - 2 views

  • I consider experimenting fearlessly with digital connections to be part of my job as a teacher.
    • Rod Corey
       
      Experimenting fearlessly is an important step in redesigning education and encouraging the development of 21st century skills.
  • Clay Burell is Korea's best kept secret, asking provocative questions about the changing nature of schooling. Jenny Luca is an Aussie dynamo, encouraging teachers to create meaningful service learning projects. Kevin Jarrett runs one of the most inventive elementary-level computer labs in New Jersey.
    • Merry Stuhr
       
      I need to check out their work!
  • The Tempered Radical
    • Megan Rice
       
      subscribe later?
  • ...23 more annotations...
  • Wouldn't young adults truly prepared for the 21st century have experience using computers to learn with—rather than simply about—the world
  • Don't today's 12-year-olds need to recognize that future coworkers are just as likely to live on the other side of the world as on the other side of town?
    • Mike Arsenault
       
      More and more of our kids will be working with their peers from around the world. Technologies like Skype and WebEx will change how they work.
    • Rod Corey
       
      This is a great point which is why worldwide collaboration in education is so important to pursue and engage in.
  • no one has taught them about the power of these connections
  • few are using those networks to pursue meaningful personal growth
  • Consider the potential: Students from different countries can explore global challenges together. Small cohorts of motivated kids can conduct studies of topics with deep personal meaning to them. Experts can "visit" classrooms thousands of miles away.
    • Rod Corey
       
      This sounds great but where do I start and how do I get going?
  • Connecting with colleagues online
    • Rod Corey
       
      This is something that I need to begin to explore.
  • no one has taught them about the power of these connections
    • Kimberly Grover
       
      When does this education begin? Or, does it matter? The impulse of typing the "emotion of the moment" overides what the adolescent brain has been taught.
  • each conversation includes opportunities for students to ask questions and feel a push against their preconceived notions.
    • Stephanie Robison
       
      This sounds like such an awesome opportunity to encourage students to defend their thinking (which is something we want them to do) in a form where it doesn't feel like a teacher assignment
  • experimenting fearlessly
    • Megan Rice
       
      same wording as ohler article
    • Stephen Fox
       
      Same editor
    • alan hall
       
      Sara, did you get this response?
  • I began using discussion tools like VoiceThread (http://voicethread.com) to create electronic forums for my students to interact with peers around classroom content—with extraordinary results
    • Stephanie Robison
       
      Voice thread is something I would like to use in the classroom. Students seem motivated by it.
    • Molly Kellogg
       
      They love it! And there are plenty of colleagues you can learn from, like the 5th and 8th grade teams.
  • "I love it when someone disagrees with me online because it makes me think again."
  • Begin by signing up for a Twitter account
    • Kimberly Grover
       
      Why twitter? Aren't there other forums to find this same information?
  • Clay Burell
  • our students have no trouble connecting, but no one has taught them about the power of these connections. Although tweens and teens may be comfortable using digital tools to build networks, few are using those networks to pursue meaningful personal growth. Our challenge as teachers is to identify ways that students can use these tools for learning.
    • Mike Arsenault
       
      This points to the fact that we must teach students about digital citizenship. They are creating their own rules in these online environments. They need some direction to cut down on the terrible negative sides of online life.
  • Model learning transparently.
    • Rod Corey
       
      What if we build time into the daily classroom routine for checking and interacting with our digigal relationships. Teachers would visit their professional learning communities and students would do the same. This could be a once a week activity, or every day...
  • The key to becoming an effective 21st century instructor is to become an efficient 21st century learner.
  • Wouldn't young adults truly prepared for the 21st century have experience using computers to learn with—rather than simply about—the world?
    • Megan Rice
       
      This is exactly what I've been saying in my blog posts...
  • Once you've taken your digital plunge, share with students how the digital connections you engage in enhance your skills and deepen your knowledge. Model learning transparently.
    • Mike Arsenault
       
      This is so important. Teachers need to be learners and must model how they learn with their students.
  • but no one has taught them about the power of these connections
    • Megan Rice
       
      I agree, but is this taught through the content we already need to cover, or a technology component?
  • Our challenge as teachers is to identify ways that students can use these tools for learning.
    • Megan Rice
       
      yes!
  • This is why I experiment with every new tool that bursts onto the teenage radar
    • Megan Rice
       
      I wish I had the time to keep up with all the sites out there! I remember when we first showed VoiceThread - kids loved it. Now, they are more familiar and not as excited because they use it elsewhere, which is wonderful, but requires me to keep up on the "newer" options.
    • Molly Kellogg
       
      This is why we need regular time scheduled into staff meetings or inservice days to just EXPLORE and collaborate with colleagues around new tools.
  • Through Twitter, you'll get short online messages from fellow practitioners that point you to resources or pose questions.
    • Megan Rice
       
      Am I ready to be tethered to my phone even more than I am?
  • Then start by following some of the good education blogs written by teachers. Many of these are listed in the Support Blogging wiki (http://supportblogging.com) and on my list of resources (www.pageflakes.com/wferriter/16618841).
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