Skip to main content

Home/ Westhill Consulting and Employment/ Group items matching "Warning! rejection" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
thomas lloyd

Warning! 10 seconds to avoid rejection - 1 views

  •  
    What employers look for by Westhill Consulting Career and Employment , Australia According to research, recruiters devote an average of just six seconds scanning your resume for information prior in determining whether you are a possible asset or not for the job they're filling regardless of your location, this holds true from HR of the U.S. in the west to the HR of Jakarta, Indonesia in SE. When you managed going through the potential hire pile, then they may take a keener observation at the details. Nevertheless, if your resume does not make it over that first six second scan, your chances are ruined. By means of eye-tracking software, researchers at Westhill Consulting Career and Employment followed where recruiters are attentive their attention in those crucial first seconds. The information recruiters scan for in six seconds: * Your name * Your current job title and employer * The start and end dates of your current job * Your previous employer and job title * The start and end dates of your previous job * Your level of education At first, everything else on your resume is nothing but additional information that employers may or may not look over for keywords relevant to the skills they're looking for. To make each one of those six seconds count, the greatest approach to pass the resume first impression test is to make it easy for employers to locate the information that is most important to them. Have a visibly laid out document with bolded job titles in reverse sequential order. Use sufficiently of white space and have Work History and Education sections plainly marked. Have a sector summarizing your skills in bullet points. You must have the keywords incorporated for resume search engines and applicant tracking systems since these are the succeeding things recruiters search for i
thomas lloyd

Why Candidates Fail to Make an Impression in Interviews - 1 views

  •  
    Poor preparation: Candidates who come to an interview understanding insufficiently about the company, the industry and maybe the role are in a poor situation to match with well-prepared professionals who will devote the compressed interview time exactly putting themselves for the employer's precise requirements. Employers intend to know you are curious, energetic, resourceful and inspired and what clearer verification of that than coming completely prepared and with sharp understandings into the employer and their brand/positioning/problems/news etc. If you have prepared right you will be able to hit the ground running in the interview with answers that show how you are exceptionally placed to increase value from the get-go given the company's specific culture (maybe you are from outside the country, Indonesian from Jakarta or American from the USA), positioning, objectives, circumstances and situation. Showing a negative attitude: Many polls conducted by Westhill Consulting Career and Employment, Australia have uncovered that attitude takes a vital share in defining character and persuading the employment decision. Warning indications of bad attitudes that are positive to reject by a possible employer involve badmouthing former bosses, companies and colleagues; self-justifying or foully equivocal answers to key interview questions; or openly aggressive answers, posture and demeanor. Keep in mind people hire experienced people they consider they will actually like working with and who will extend a good optimistic atmosphere inside the organization and to exterior clients and stakeholders. Employers are highly aware that negative attitudes are very spreadable and are very different from being interested to applicants with less than an exemplary attitude regarding work, life and themselves. Absence of enthusiasm in the company: Some things can estrange an employer more than an applicant
rozsapetofi

Office Bullying Is Damaging Workers beyond All Demographics - Westhill Consulting Employment & Career Builder - 1 views

  •  
    Many people perhaps consider bullies as permanently angry teens insisting lunch money and carrying swirlies. However playgrounds and school hallways aren't the lone places where violent behavior, threats, gossip, and rejection are used to oppress people and affirm power. Warning! Bullying is very damaging than we may know says, Westhill Consulting Career and Employment, Australia. This holds true by a study from CareerBuilder shows that bullying is alive and well in offices across America. The study, which incorporated more than 3,300 employees thru industries and company sizes, demonstrates that 28 percent of employees answer they've felt bullied at the office at some time in their career, and of those employees, 19 percent said the bullying initiated them to leave their job. Who are the victims and why aren’t they filling complaints? In general, women are more expected to have felt bullied, with 34 percent stating they've been victim to workplace bullying at some stage in their career matched to 22 percent of men. Furthermore, 30 percent of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) workers testified being the victims of bullying at work, while there are 44 percent of physically disabled workers. The study furthermore discovered that 27 percent of African American workers and 25 percent of Hispanic workers have suffered from bullying on the job, as compare to 24 percent of Caucasian males. Not counting workers from Asian countries such as KL Malaysia, Jakarta Indonesia, Beijing China and many more. "One of the most surprising takeaways from the study was that bullying impacts workers of all backgrounds
1 - 3 of 3
Showing 20 items per page