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Nigel Robertson

The parable of the farmers and the Teleporting Duplicator | Dr Mike Taylor | Science | ... - 0 views

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    Using food as an analogy for the Internet & copyright and academic publishing houses.
Nigel Robertson

Unbundling Education, A Simple Framework | M. P. STATON - 0 views

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    Graphic on some key aspects of the role a university takes and offers.
Nigel Robertson

Donald Clark Plan B: More pedagogic change in 10 years than last 1000 years - all drive... - 0 views

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    More Goodness from DBC on how we learn has changed but not the way we teach.
Nigel Robertson

Collaborate to compete - Seizing the opportunity of online learning for UK higher educa... - 0 views

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    HEFCE report from the Online Learning Task Force which aims to address how UK HE can extend its position as a leader in online learning.
Nigel Robertson

High School 2.0 : Education Next - 0 views

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    Article on the School of the Future in US - how it's done, the successes and problems.
Nigel Robertson

DHQ: Digital Humanities Quarterly: Designing Choreographies for the New Economy of Atte... - 0 views

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    The nature of the academic lecture has changed with the introduction of wi-fi and cellular technologies. Interacting with personal screens during a lecture or other live event has become commonplace and, as a result, the economy of attention that defines these situations has changed. Is it possible to pay attention when sending a text message or surfing the web? For that matter, does distraction always detract from the learning that takes place in these environments? In this article, we ask questions concerning the texture and shape of this emerging economy of attention. We do not take a position on the efficiency of new technologies for delivering educational content or their efficacy of competing for users' time and attention. Instead, we argue that the emerging social media provide new methods for choreographing attention in line with the performative conventions of any given situation. Rather than banning laptops and phones from the lecture hall and the classroom, we aim to ask what precisely they have on offer for these settings understood as performative sites, as well as for a culture that equates individual attentional behavior with intellectual and moral aptitude.
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    "The nature of the academic lecture has changed with the introduction of wi-fi and cellular technologies. Interacting with personal screens during a lecture or other live event has become commonplace and, as a result, the economy of attention that defines these situations has changed. Is it possible to pay attention when sending a text message or surfing the web? For that matter, does distraction always detract from the learning that takes place in these environments? In this article, we ask questions concerning the texture and shape of this emerging economy of attention. We do not take a position on the efficiency of new technologies for delivering educational content or their efficacy of competing for users' time and attention. Instead, we argue that the emerging social media provide new methods for choreographing attention in line with the performative conventions of any given situation. Rather than banning laptops and phones from the lecture hall and the classroom, we aim to ask what precisely they have on offer for these settings understood as performative sites, as well as for a culture that equates individual attentional behavior with intellectual and moral aptitude."
Nigel Robertson

Confessions of an Aca/Fan: Why Universities Shouldn't Create "Something like YouTube" (... - 0 views

  • Many universities are trying to figure out how they can build "something like YouTube" to support their educational activities. Most of them end up building things that are very little like YouTube in that they tend to lock down the content and make it hard to move into other spaces and mobilize in other conversations. In a sense, these university based sites are about disciplining the flow of knowledge rather than facilitating it.
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    Discussing how universities want to control knowledge rather than letting it flow freely.
Nigel Robertson

UK Web Focus | Events | What If We're Wrong? - 0 views

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    Many members of JISC Emerge community are active in exploiting the potential of various Web 2.0 technologies and approaches. But what if the Web 2.0 sceptics are right? What if Web 2.0 services aren't sustainable? What if the social aspect of social networking tools are too intrusive? How should we go about developing a sustainable approach to use of Web 2.0?
Nigel Robertson

Speaking to Ascilite, ACODE and Desire2Learn « Learn Online - 0 views

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    "In the context of a growing emphasis on eLearning, most commonly facilitated by enterprise-scale Learning Management System and a range of institutionally managed and supported communication and collaboration software tools, and in an environment of increasing emphasis on intellectual property rights management and quality assurance, how do universities (and other educational institutions) respond to the use of free, open-access tools in common use by their students? What are the potential educational uses of such tools? What are the current practices of use of these tools within educational institutions? What are the issues, risks and hidden costs? What are the advantages and benefits?"
Nigel Robertson

Perspectives in Assessment - 0 views

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    Abstract
    How we go about assessing HE students has such a significant impact on student learning that we need to rethink our whole curriculum design process to foreground assessment.
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