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Mr. D D

Constructivist Learning - 1 views

  • Constructivism is an epistemological belief about what "knowing" is and how one "come to know."
  • rejects the notions
  • Constructivism, with focus on social nature of cognition, suggests an approach that
  • ...66 more annotations...
  • learners the
  • learners the
  • learners the
  • opportunity for concrete, contextually meaningful experience through which they can search for patterns, raise their own questions, and construct their own models.
  • engage in activity, discourse, and reflection
  • take on more ownership of the ideas, and to pursue autonomy, mutual reciprocity of social relations, and empowerment to be the goals.
  • "knowledge proceeds neither solely from the experience of objects nor from an innate programming
  • but from successive constructions."
  • and the effect of social interaction, language, and culture on learning.
  • This movement occurs in the so-called "zone of proximal development" as a result of social interaction.
  • disappointed with the overwhelming control of environment over human behavior that is represented in behaviorism.
  • recognized two
  • internalization
  • basic processes operating continuously at every level of human activity
  • internalization and externalization
  • complex mental function is first an interaction between people
  • becomes a process within individuals
  • This transformation involves the mastery of external means of thinking and learning to use symbols to control and regulate one's thinking.
  • the claim is that mental processes can be understood only if we understand the tools and signs that mediate them
  • the gesture of pointing could not have been established as a sign without the reaction of the other person.
  • Bruner's key concepts
  • mode of representing past events through appropriate motor responses
  • which enables
  • perceiver to "summarize events by organization of percepts and of images
  • symbol system which represents things by design features that can be arbitrary and remote, e.g. language
  • Bruner's influence on instruction
  • Translating material into children's modes of thought:
  • enable learners to develop cognitive growth: questioning, prompting
  • discovery as" all forms of obtaining knowledge for oneself by the use of one's own mind
  • Interpersonal interaction
  • Discovery learning:
  • Spiral Curriculum:
  • promote concept discovery, the teacher presents the set of instances that will best help learners to develop an appropriate model of the concept.
  • cognitive constructivists
  • sociocultural constructivists
  • focusing on the individual cognitive construction of mental structures;
  • emphasizing the social interaction and cultural practice on the construction of knowledge
  • Promote discovery in the exercise of problem solving
  • Variables in instruction: nature of knowledge, nature of the knower, and nature of the knowledge-getting process
  • Feedback must be provided in a mode that is both meaningful and within the information-processing capacity of the learner.
  • Intrinsic pleasure of discovery promote a sense of self-reward
  • Knowledge cannot exist independently from the knower;
  • Learning is viewed as self-regulatory process
  • Cognitive constructivists focus on the active mental construction struggling with the conflict between existing personal models of the world, and incoming information in the environment.
  • Sociocultural constructivists emphasis
  • in which learners construct their models of reality as a meaning-making undertaking with culturally developed tools and symbols
  • and negotiate such meaning thorough cooperative social activity, discourse and debate (
  • Learners are active in making sense of things instead of responding to stimuli.
  • learners " make tentative interpretations of experience
  • requires invention and self-organization
  • Errors need to be perceived as a result of learners' conceptions and therefore not minimized or avoided.
  • the learners are responsible for defending, proving, justifying, and communicating their ideas to the classroom community.
  • humans seek to organize and generalize across experiences
  • According to TIP's
  • Theory Into Practice
  • Spiral organization:
  • Going beyond the information given:
  • Readiness:
  • learning is an active process in which learners construct new ideas or concepts based upon their current/past knowledge.
  • learning is an active process in which learners construct new ideas or concepts based upon their current/past knowledge.
  • learning is an active process in which learners construct new ideas or concepts based upon their current/past knowledge.
  • that learning is an active process in which learners construct new ideas or concepts based upon their current/past knowledge.
  • Instruction must be structured so that it can be easily grasped by the student
  • learning is an active process in which learners construct new ideas or concepts based upon their current/past knowledge.
  • learning is an active process in which learners construct new ideas or concepts based upon their current/past knowledge.
  • Bruner's major theoretical framework is that learning is an active process in which learners construct new ideas or concepts based upon their current/past knowledge.
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