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Jenny Sommers

Innovation Excellence | 10 Emerging Educational Technologies & How They Are Being Used ... - 0 views

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    interesting... the photo looks familiar!
Jenny Sommers

How To Increase Higher Order Thinking - 0 views

  • Parents and teachers can do a lot to encourage higher order thinking, even when they are answering children’s questions
  •  “Don’t ask me any more questions.” “Because I said so.”
    • Jenny Sommers
       
      Garth- this reminds me of our conversation of how we shut children's learning down.
  • ...14 more annotations...
  • Level 1. Reject the question.
  • Level 2. Restate or almost restate the question as a response.
  • Level 3. Admit ignorance or present information.
  • Level 4. Voice encouragement to seek response through authority.
  • Level 5. Encourage brainstorming, or consideration of alternative explanations.
  • Level 6. Encourage consideration of alternative explanations and a means of evaluating them.
  • Level 7. Encourage consideration of alternative explanations plus a means of evaluating them, and follow-through on evaluations.
  • When brainstorming, it is important to remember all ideas are put out on the table. Which ones are “keepers” and which ones are tossed in the trashcan is decided later.
  • Encourage Questioning. Divergent questions asked by students should not be discounted. When students realize that they can ask about what they want to know without negative reactions from teachers, their creative behavior tends to generalize to other areas. If time will not allow discussion at that time, the teacher can incorporate the use of a “Parking Lot” board where ideas are “parked” on post-it notes until a later time that day or the following day.
    • Jenny Sommers
       
      I like this idea of the "parking lot" board. Students do need to feel like asking questions is ok- this doesn't stifle them but lets class continue on track.
  • Students should be explicitly taught at a young age how to infer or make inferences.
  • a teacher may use bumper stickers or well-known slogans and have the class brainstorm the inferences that can be drawn from them.
    • Jenny Sommers
       
      I like this example.
  • How to Answer Children’s Questions In a Way that Promotes Higher Order Thinking
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    interesting read- especially the section on "how to answer children's questions in a way that promotes higher order thinking
Jenny Sommers

TeacherWeb® - WebQuests - 0 views

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    information about what a webquest is as well as examples and a template
David Pluck

Education - 0 views

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    The Guggenheim New Yorks link to the educators event page
David Pluck

The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Learn - 0 views

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    Link to The Metropolitan Museum of Arts educator resources 
David Pluck

Online Tours | Louvre Museum | Paris - 0 views

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    Great resource for art teacher! Online virtual tour of the Louvre. Free online field trip!!
Jay Martinez

Spanish | Learn about Spanish on instaGrok, the research engine - 0 views

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    need help teaching some Spanish?
Lenna Black

Create timelines, share them on the web | Timetoast timelines - 0 views

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    This is a fun program that is very easy to use!
Lenna Black

Diagram Software to draw Flowcharts, UML diagrams & more Online | Creately - 0 views

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    This is a great free program similar to inspiration.
Michael O'Connor

Learning Styles and Children | Funderstanding - 0 views

  • 20 to 30 percent of learners remember through hearing, 40 percent retain information visually, and the rest either have higher memory retention after writing something down or through real-life activities.
  • There are three learning styles – visual, auditory, and kinesthetic and tactile.
  • Visual Learners Visual learners like having information presented to them in an eye-catching way, have strong visualization skills, and to see the “big picture.” Enjoy a fun activity with visual learners encouraging their language and reading skills. Tie the activity into the child’s homework by using vocabulary or spelling words for an upcoming test. Help the child create a list of nouns, verbs, adjectives, and pronouns to use for the activity. If they have a list of vocabulary or spelling words they need to memorize for school, they can be added to the list. Kids can select a color for each type of word and then write them onto flashcards using the coordinating color for each word group (green for nouns). Have the child place the cards in stacks according to color/type. Discuss with the child that they will be creating a visual language story using the words by placing them into sentences and a finished story. This encourages visual learners to see the big picture and understand the final outcome of the activity. Once the child has begun forming sentences, he can arrange them to form a story, working until all the words have been used. Tap into his auditory and kinesthetic/tactile learning, and his active processors, by having him read the story out loud while acting it out.
Wayne Nieman

instaGrok | A new way to learn - 1 views

    • Kevin Somerville
       
      InstaGrok is an excellent search engine for students.
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    One of the best educational search engines for students!
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