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Cathy Oxley

Free Technology for Teachers: Beyond Google - Improve Your Search Results - 20 views

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    " Beyond Google - AddThis Posted by Mr. Byrne at 2:12 PM Labels: Google, Internet search, teaching technology, Teaching With Technology, Technology Integration, web search, web search strategies 5 comments: SIS Media Specialist said... Geesh Richard, another great resource; like your posts are not enough. Many, many thanks. I have followed your blog for about a year and have learned SO MUCH. I understand you are from CT. Any chance we can get you to the joint annual CASL/CECA (Connecticut Association of School Librarians and Connecticut Educators Computer Association) conference next year? October 24, 2009 10:35 PM Mr. Byrne said... Yes, I am originally from Connecticut. In fact, I went to CCSU for freshman year. I'd like to come to CASL/CECA. Can you send me an email? richardbyrne (at) freetech4teachers Thanks. October 25, 2009 6:47 AM Linux and Friends said... Thanks for the amazing document. I am aware of a few of the resources listed in the document. However, many of the others are new to me. I will definitely check them out. November 2, 2009 9:45 PM dunnes said... I visited and bookmarked four sites from this post! Thank you for the great resource. Students want to use Google rather than stick to the school library catalog, but they need more instruction on how to do this. I have seen too many children search with ineffective terms, and then waste time clicking on their random results. November 8, 2009 12:38 PM Lois said... Beyond Google is a great resource. I wish I had your skills for taking what you learn and putting it together as you do. I love reading your daily blog. November 15, 2009 10:04 AM Post a Comment Links to this post Beyond Google: Improve Your Search Results http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2009/10/beyond-Google-improve-your-search.html While working with some of my colleagues in a workshop earlier this week, I was reminded that a lot of people aren't familiar with tools
Dennis OConnor

Five Forms of Filtering « Innovation Leadership Network - 12 views

  • We create economic value out of information when we figure out an effective strategy that includes aggregating, filtering and connecting.
  • So, the real question is, how do we design filters that let us find our way through this particular abundance of information? And, you know, my answer to that question has been: the only group that can catalog everything is everybody. One of the reasons you see this enormous move towards social filters, as with Digg, as with del.icio.us, as with Google Reader, in a way, is simply that the scale of the problem has exceeded what professional catalogers can do. But, you know, you never hear twenty-year-olds talking about information overload because they understand the filters they’re given. You only hear, you know, forty- and fifty-year-olds taking about it, sixty-year-olds talking about because we grew up in the world of card catalogs and TV Guide. And now, all the filters we’re used to are broken and we’d like to blame it on the environment instead of admitting that we’re just, you know, we just don’t understand what’s going on.
  • Judgement-based filtering is what people do.
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  • The five forms of filtering break into two categories: judgement-based, or mechanical.
  • However, even experts can’t deal with all of the information available on the subjects that interest them – that’s why they end up specialising.
  • As we gain skills and knowledge, the amount of information we can process increases. If we invest enough time in learning something, we can reach filter like an expert.
  • There can also be expert networks – in some sense that is what the original search engines were, and what mahalo.com is trying now. The problem that the original search engines encountered is that the amount of information available on the web expanded so quickly that it outstripped the ability of the network to keep up with it. This led to the development of google’s search algorithm – an example of one of the versions of mechanical filtering: algorithmic.
  • heingold also provides a pretty good description of the other form of mechanical filtering, heuristic, in his piece on crap detection. Heuristic filtering is based on a set of rules or routines that people can follow to help them sort through the information available to them.
  • Filtering by itself is important, but it only creates value when you combine it with aggregating and connecting. As Rheingold puts it:
  • The important part, as I stressed at the beginning, is in your head. It really doesn’t do any good to multiply the amount of information flowing in, and even filtering that information so that only the best gets to you, if you don’t have a mental cognitive and social strategy for how you’re going to deploy your attention. (emphasis added)
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    I've been seeking a way to explain why I introduce Diigo along with Information fluency skills in the E-Learning for Educators Course. This article quickly draws the big picture.  Folks seeking to become online teachers are pursuing a specialized teaching skill that requires an information filtering strategy as well as what Rheingold calls "a mental cognitive and social strategy for how you're going to deploy your attention."
Marita Thomson

Start Smart @ UOW - 0 views

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    University entails a world of academic information where Google is only one of the information tools you'll need to use. Lecturers will expect you to find academic information from the resources provided free to you by the UOW Library. StartSmart gives you the essential skills and confidence to approach your first assessment task.
Anthony Beal

SearchReSearch - 23 views

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    A blog about search, search skills, teaching search, learning how to search, learning how to use Google effectively, learning how to do research. It also covers a good deal of sensemaking and information foraging.
Jeff Yasinchuk

How to solve impossible problems: Daniel Russell's awesome Google search techniques - 41 views

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    This has some great information. Can someone show me an educational sight or app that I can use to develop my own skills in google searching? Maybe a game with scenarios such as Daniel Russell poses in this post.
Cathy Oxley

Search Rescue -- Campus Technology - 41 views

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    "As a way to instill better research skills, a university librarian discusses innovative ways to move students--and faculty--beyond their reliance on Google."
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    Great article, quite inspirational...
Judy O'Connell

Survive and Thrive! An Advocacy Toolkit for School Librarians - 42 views

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    It's time for school librarians to step out and enlighten their communities about all the ways their libraries impact students' education.
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    "It's time for school librarians to step out and enlighten their communities about all the ways their libraries impact students' education."
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    "On this site, you will find message templates (sample e-mails, letters, newsletter blurbs, brochures, and even videos) containing these taglines and targeting specific stakeholder audiences in order to promote school librarians as 21st century skills experts. We hope that these sample templates will be used by school librarians and school library advocates to inform their communities about the vital and irreplaceable role that school librarians play in teaching and learning. Maybe you'll get inspired to create something for us that we can use, too. In the meantime, we hope you find this site helpful."
Patricia ErkenBrack

connected classroom - 0 views

information literacy connected classroom

started by Patricia ErkenBrack on 18 Dec 15 no follow-up yet
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