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Scott Hambrick

American Memory from the Library of Congress - Home Page - 5 views

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    Contains histories from the Library of Congress by topic
Kenneth O'Regan

Truman Library - Social Studies web sites - 1 views

  • The National Assessment of Educational Progress has a website where released U.S. History items may be found
    • Kenneth O'Regan
       
      Some items on this site might not be entirely up to date. It appears to me that this link is no longer active.
  • A website on the flags of the world
    • Kenneth O'Regan
       
      Other websites, like this one, seem to be a little bit suspect. Use discretion.
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    Say what you will about Harry Truman, but his library website has a vast cache of social studies links and resources, organized by topic. Some of the items go beyond social studies and into the realm of homework help and other teaching strategies. You may need to a dig a little bit to find exactly what you are looking for, but you can probably somehow get to it from here.
Sarah Franquemont

12,000 Online Newspapers - Newspapers 24.com - 2 views

    • Sarah Franquemont
       
      Many of the newspapers from other countries are also in other languages, however; most countries also have at least one English paper.
    • Sarah Franquemont
       
      Notice that papers can be browsed by language.
    • Sarah Franquemont
       
      The United States section of the site also allows browsing of newspapers by state, so this site would be useful for a lesson or unit on national media; for projects on specific states; or lessons on national current events.
    • Sarah Franquemont
       
      Clicking on a country also gives basic, factual information on that country; like population and a picture of the country's flag.
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    This website links to thousands of newspapers worldwide. I would use this site to collect primary sources or as a research mechanism for current events.  It would be a valuable resource to students who are doing research projects on a specific country or international topic.
Nate Merrill

The map as history : a multimedia atlas of world history with animated historical maps - 5 views

    • Lauren Olson
       
      This is a great site for visual learners. Being able to see political and culutral transformations of continents is an incredible tool for students of all ages. Unfortunately, not all maps on this site are free. There is a nominal fee that charges for acess to more obscure maps.
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    Tags?
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    "The largest on-line collection of animated historical maps"
Jamie Josephson

Awesome Stories - 6 views

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    Pre-categorized primary sources--such as "disasters" or "inspiration". Seems great for first exposure to primary sources as research or going deeper than the textbook
Laura Wood

Globalization 101 - 1 views

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    Great resource on globalization. I used the issues briefs for my unit plan. They have different collections of articles about various global issues. Supposedly they are academic and opinionless, which is nice because it gives more balance than most of the other stuff you get. :-)
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    Oh. But the lesson plans are for college level so . . . I wouldn't use those. Or you could adapt them. :-)
Debbie Moore

HarpWeek: Explore History - 2 views

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    I discovered this website while looking for information on Chinese and Japanese immigration. This website supports the newspaper Harper's Weekly that was published from 1857 to 1912. The publication reported on the relevant issues of the day such as immigration, slavery and presidential elections. Not only do they have the actual papers in their archive, they also provide summaries of some of the articles. There is a section dedicated to Immigration and Ethnic America. While there is a great deal of information on the site that is fee to all, one must subscribe to gain access to the entire site. The site also provides links to many other websites that support learning such as lessons, activities, and games. Some of their links are oriented around subjects that were relevant during the time the papers were published. There is also a featured "cartoon" of the day that is taken from the period of 1857 to 1912. It is a great resource for teachers!
Joellen Kriss

Explorers - A - EnchantedLearning.com - 0 views

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    Part of Enchantedlearning.com, this site has easily accessible and fairly comprehensive information about different topics. This page specifically is about explorers (clearly) and could be very useful as either a place to direct your students to for their own research OR a personal crash course.
Kenneth O'Regan

History Matters: The U.S. Survey Course on the Web - 1 views

  • many pasts - explore over 800 primary source documents, images, and audio interviews
    many pasts icon
    • Laura Wood
       
      "contains 1,000 primary documents in text, image, and audio that emphasize the experiences of "ordinary" Americans throughout U.S. history. All of the documents have been screened by historians and are accompanied by annotations that address their larger historical significance and context. Browse a list of documents sorted by time period, beginning with the earliest. Or visit the Advanced Search to quickly locate documents by topic, time period, keyword, or type of document."
  • making sense of evidence - read how historians approach sources and use them to make sense of the past
    • Laura Wood
       
      "helps students and teachers make effective use of primary sources. "Making Sense of Documents" provide detailed strategies for analyzing online primary materials (including film, music, numbers, photographs, advertisements, oral history, and letters and diaries) with interactive exercises and a guide to traditional and online sources. "Scholars in Action" segments show how scholars puzzle out the meaning of different kinds of primary sources (from cartoons to house inventories), allowing you to try to make sense of a document yourself and then providing audio clips in which leading scholars interpret the document and discuss strategies for overall analysis."
  • www.history - search over 700 fully reviewed and annotated websites in American history
    • Laura Wood
       
      "is our annotated guide to more than 850 useful websites for teaching U.S. history and social studies. We have carefully selected and screened each site for quality and provide a 1-paragraph annotation that summarizes its content, its strengths and weaknesses, and its utility for teachers. Information is provided on the type of resource (text, images, audio, and video) available. Browse sites by topic and time period or look through a list of some of our favorite sites. Or visit the Advanced Search to quickly locate WWW.History sites by topic, time period, keyword, kind of primary source, or type of resource. We also include extended scholarly web reviews as a regular feature of History Matters. In collaboration with the Journal of American History (JAH) we review approximately 25 websites per year. The reviews are co-published by the JAH and History Matters and appear in both venues. The archive page offers all featured web reviews."
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • puzzled by the past - an archive of past quizzes
    • Laura Wood
       
      "Between 1997 and 2003, History Matters presented historical puzzles and quizzes. We are no longer adding new puzzles, but we include here an archive of 20 past puzzles that can be used in classrooms to inspire creative thinking and challenge assumptions."
    • Laura Wood
       
      This link has fantastic descriptions of what you can find in each of the sections of the site. I've posted some of the more exciting ones below but this site has a ton of useful history information . . .
  • Designed for high school and college teachers and students,
    • Kenneth O'Regan
       
      I dont know how to undo or ignore the sticky notes of the previous user of this site...Ill post my own and I guess they will all just get mixed up.
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    From the website: History Matters is "a project of the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning of the City University of New York and the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Visible Knowledge Project.
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    Designed for high school and college teachers and students of U.S. history survey courses, this site serves as a gateway to web resources and offers unique teaching materials, first-person primary documents, and guides to analyzing historical evidence.

    We emphasize materials that focus on the lives of ordinary Americans and actively involve students in analyzing and interpreting evidence."
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    Well, it looks like a student in this group shared this in the past, but what a great website! I'll put up some more sticky notes.
    This website features a large number of primary source material of different media and is strong in its content. Beyond that, this site features information about the methods historians use (interesting to high school students, applicable to college students), a database of reviewed websites, lesson plans, syllabi, and teaching tips. A pretty comprehensive resource.
Joellen Kriss

World religions - 4 views

    • Joellen Kriss
       
      Also gives info on hos religions interact with other aspects of society as well as more non-traditional "religions" like atheism (which they call "non-theistic")
    • Joellen Kriss
       
      Offer their thoughts on what is religion and show the symbols of many world religions down below.
Laura Wood

The New York Times Learning Network - 1 views

    • Laura Wood
       
      So there are usually Daily Lesson Plans but apparently they are revamping the site so these are temporarily on hiatus. However you CAN access the over 2,000 lesson plans (in the "Lesson Plan Archive" below) they have on the site. I did a search for 9-12 grade economics lessons and hit paydirt. I <3 NY Times.
    • Laura Wood
       
      The site says that the "News Snapshot" is for younger kids BUT it might be a great way to gather background information on a picture and gives you all the information to give students contexts about current events.
    • Laura Wood
       
      Wasn't someone saying that their students demanded that this be on the board every day. Well here's a one stop shop to find information about what happened today (historically speaking of course).
  • ...3 more annotations...
    • Laura Wood
       
      SERIOUSLY!?!?!? The New York TImes makes themed historical crossword puzzles!?!?!

      So many to choose from. I'm not sure how helpful this will actually be to students. It may be neat if they could play it online and google search for answers. Might be a cool way to learn even more information on events we cover in class. It would be important to not just make this busy work (why I had word finds).
    • Laura Wood
       
      Daily headlines with one sentence summaries. Short and Sweet.
      Could be easily followed with "Daily News Quiz" (below).
    • Laura Wood
       
      You can't escape standardized tests.
      The NY Times offers a test question of the day sponsored by Kaplan. They also explain the answers.
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    This site is RAD! Current and Recent Events resource

    From the website:
    "Students can read the day's top stories using Knowledge Tools, take a news quiz about today's world, and play special crossword puzzles. . . .

    Teachers can access a daily lesson plan for grades 6-12, written in partnership with The Bank Street College of Education in New York City. Each lesson plan and the article it references can be printed out for classroom use. Previous lessons are available in the archive and in thematic lesson plan units. . . The site additionally provides teachers with the latest education news from the newspaper. "
Debbie Moore

home - Smithsonian's History Explorer - 0 views

    • Erin Power
       
      This website relies on Smithsonian reference information, mostly online exhibits. This means the information is reputable. It's also organized in an incredibly efficient way.

      I think I would love to keep this site bookmarked, and check it out as I progress through a curriculum. It's so easy to use - pick your period, quickly scroll through to see if anything is interesting to you.

      This is valuable to Social Studies teachers who are looking to incorporate online materials without spending a ton of time looking for them.
    • Erin Power
       
      Oh! I just figured out that the websites posted are even marked to what grade-level they are targeted to.
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    This website is a great reference page for finding resources based on historical periods.
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    Smithsonian's History Explorer provides a multitute of resources for teachers including lessons, activities, interactive activities, examples of artifacts, and professional development opportunities for educators. One can easily search for desired resources by selecting the grade level, type of resource desired, and the time period. A variety of American History related subjects are displayed and from that list, one can select the desired resource.
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