Skip to main content

Home/ Revolution 2.0/ Group items tagged revolution2.0

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Hossam el-Hamalawy

90 million cell phone subscriptions in Egypt, ministry says | Egypt Independent - 0 views

  • Around 31 million people use the internet
  • There are currently over 90 million cell phone subscribers in Egypt, while only 8.6 million people use landlines, according to the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology.
Hossam el-Hamalawy

luna17: Cyberspace Leninism? - 2 views

  •  
    alex is being very generous in this article. Of course he and I have great respect for the Swp and hope to continue working with them but our observations of the Internet have led to a quite different understanding of what sort, ie what shape, organisation we need in 21st century.

    I am writing something on the back of my paper which I presented to Historical Materialism conference. Will send round this group for collaboration.

    Great piece tho Alex, thx for reposting Hoss. Merry christmas to all. x
Clare Solomon

TechnicalTactics: Security-in-a-box - 2 views

  •  
    LOADS of tools, guidance and advice on how to securely use the internet and other tools such as videos, mobile phone technology etc
Clare Solomon

Technical Tactics for Mobile Phones - 3 views

  •  
    LOADS of tools, guidance and advice on how to effectively use the internet and other tools such as videos, mobile phone technology etc
James Buck

groundviews - 0 views

  •  
    same: guys, please have a look - met a Sri Lankan fellow who pointed me to dissident blogs in his area. Not as developed as the Egypt scene but I thought it would be good to connect and I'm hoping to help them learn your model and use CPB for safety as well.
Clare Solomon

Homeland Security declares right 2 block "popular" websites during pandemic - 0 views

  •  
    what about during a revolution? No, seriously comrades, this is something we all need to think about...
Hossam el-Hamalawy

cpegypt.masry | Scribd - 0 views

  •  
    The Egyptian Communist Party's account on Scribd
Mohamed ElGohary

كيف أستخدم تويتر؟ - 0 views

  •  
    كيف تستخدم تويتر
Hossam el-Hamalawy

Moldovan Protests: Was it really a "Twitter Revolution"? | DigiActive.org - 0 views

  • The analysis on the technological aspects of this event in the past few days have revealed a different story.  It still involves Twitter, but Twitter has a different role.  While Twitter had a part in the pre-protest mobilization in and around Chisinau on Monday night, it may not have necessarily turned the protests into mobs or rioters, nor did it necessarily invoke the violence that occurred on Tuesday, as some believe.

    As Evegeny Morozov, a fellow at the Open Society Institute, pointed out, Twitter’s more important role was getting the information out to the world, bringing it international attention and keeping the story alive and buzzing, as well as acting as a channel to push out user-generated content from on the ground.  After some great immediate analysis of the Twitter scene in Moldova (which was a follow up to his initial, but still quite insightful assessment on Tuesday), Morozov found that there were actually very few registered Twitter users in the country, and he suspects that most of the Tweets on #pman were not on the ground and were elsewhere in the world, taking information and pushing it along.

    Aside from the fact that the government of Moldova quickly shut down cell phone service for the square where the riots took place, it seems there is limited use for Twitter in terms of mobilization efforts once you already have people in the square.  The violence was somewhat self-contained and more of a product of human beings being human beings than a technologically enhanced provocation.  As you might predict, the use of a megaphone became more useful than using Twitter.

    However, the broader set of social media tools beyond Twitter seems to have played a greater part in the process of mobilization than originally thought, as Daniel Bennett hints at in his blog post discussing the events.  One commenter to Bennet’s blog, Julien, stated that “If it were social media, I’d say it were rather social networks like Facebook.

  • As Evegeny Morozov, a fellow at the Open Society Institute, pointed out, Twitter’s more important role was getting the information out to the world, bringing it international attention and keeping the story alive and buzzing, as well as acting as a channel to push out user-generated content from on the ground.  After some great immediate analysis of the Twitter scene in Moldova (which was a follow up to his initial, but still quite insightful assessment on Tuesday), Morozov found that there were actually very few registered Twitter users in the country, and he suspects that most of the Tweets on #pman were not on the ground and were elsewhere in the world, taking information and pushing it along
  • “As evisoft stated, Twitter was used for the initial organization and consequent spread of information. Add facebook statuses tied to twitter updates and a few other means like SMSes, word of mouth, LiveJournal.

    There is no doubt about Twitter’s role on starting/organizing the protests, but they’ve evolved into something bigger and way too hard to coordinate anything.”

1 - 20 of 118 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page