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Hossam el-Hamalawy

Late Night Stories حكاوى آخر الليل: ٥٠ نصيحة للتعامل مع تويتر - 0 views

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    Nice posting by Shokeir on Twitter.
Hossam el-Hamalawy

Twitter Added 30 Million Users In The Past Two Months - 0 views

  • Twitter now has 175 million registered users
  • This is impressive growth considering that Twitter had a total of 58 million users in 2009 (and 503,000 users three years ago). That’s a 200 percent increase from 2009 to 2010 in terms of users. And the year isn’t over—it’s conceivable that at the rate Twitter is growing, the company could be ringing in the New Year with 200 million users. So what’s contributing to this massive growth?
Hossam el-Hamalawy

5 reasons why Adobe Flash will slowly but surely go extinct | Tarek Shalaby - 0 views

  • There’s no real way for Google search to completely grasp the content of a Flash file.
  • The main attraction in Flash is the reason behind its poor performance. Very rarely will you come across a website built in Flash that does not require significant time to load.
  • Flash player has been known to crash across the different browsers.
Hossam el-Hamalawy

Why we should all use Firefox and NOT Google Chrome | Tarek Shalaby - 3 views

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    Interesting posting by Tarek Shalaby
Hossam el-Hamalawy

Twitter, Facebook, and social activism : The New Yorker - 1 views

  • “Western journalists who couldn’t reach—or didn’t bother reaching?—people on the ground in Iran simply scrolled through the English-language tweets post with tag #iranelection,” she wrote. “Through it all, no one seemed to wonder why people trying to coordinate protests in Iran would be writing in any language other than Farsi.”
  • This pattern shows up again and again. One study of the Red Brigades, the Italian terrorist group of the nineteen-seventies, found that seventy per cent of recruits had at least one good friend already in the organization. The same is true of the men who joined the mujahideen in Afghanistan. Even revolutionary actions that look spontaneous, like the demonstrations in East Germany that led to the fall of the Berlin Wall, are, at core, strong-tie phenomena. The opposition movement in East Germany consisted of several hundred groups, each with roughly a dozen members. Each group was in limited contact with the others: at the time, only thirteen per cent of East Germans even had a phone. All they knew was that on Monday nights, outside St. Nicholas Church in downtown Leipzig, people gathered to voice their anger at the state. And the primary determinant of who showed up was “critical friends”—the more friends you had who were critical of the regime the more likely you were to join the protest.
  • This is the second crucial distinction between traditional activism and its online variant: social media are not about this kind of hierarchical organization. Facebook and the like are tools for building networks, which are the opposite, in structure and character, of hierarchies. Unlike hierarchies, with their rules and procedures, networks aren’t controlled by a single central authority. Decisions are made through consensus, and the ties that bind people to the group are loose.
Hossam el-Hamalawy

A web-archival solution needed | أحمد غربية Ahmad Gharbeia - 1 views

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    I succumbed and paid the USD40 for the diigo premium account. Not what I had in mind, but I became dependent on diigo for blogging and my research work in general.
Hossam el-Hamalawy

Poynter Online - Mobile Media - 0 views

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    Interesting read.
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