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Pam Thompson

Writing Prompts for the 6+1 Traits - 0 views

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    Prompts main image The best prompts are the ones that spark a personal connection between the writer and their ideas. Provided here are some generic writing prompts to get you started, but you will also find some tips on how to write your own prompts. These self-written prompts will offer better starting blocks for your students than the generic prompts because they spring from the immediacy of their lives. Another source for writing prompts is Blowing Away the State writing Assessment by Jane Bell Keister. Narrative 1. It is 20 years from now. Your name has just been called and you are about to receive an award. Tell the story of how you came to be so successful and win this award. (Gr. 6-12) 2. Rewrite a fairy tale from a different point of view. For instance, * The Three Pigs as the wolf would tell it * Hansel & Gretel as the witch would tell it OR, use any example you like. (Gr. 5-8) 3. Write a story based on one of the following: * Where is it? * Breaking loose * If I had my way ... * Suddenly, in the headlights ... * That noise! * Don't even remind me * The biggest nuisance * Annoying! * At last! (Gr. 5-12) 4. Think of your best or worst day in school. Tell the story of what happened. (Gr. 4 & up) 5. Write a story based on ONE of the following * Little brothers (or sisters) * Older sisters (or brothers) * A narrow escape * My first memory * I'd like to go back * You won't believe it, but ... (Gr. 4 & up) 6. Think of a friend you have, in or out of school. Tell one story that comes to mind when you think of this friend. (All grades) 7. Think of an event you will want to remember when you are old. Tell about what happened in a way that's so clear that if you read this story again when you are eighty, every detail will come flooding back as if it happened y
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    Prompts main image The best prompts are the ones that spark a personal connection between the writer and their ideas. Provided here are some generic writing prompts to get you started, but you will also find some tips on how to write your own prompts. These self-written prompts will offer better starting blocks for your students than the generic prompts because they spring from the immediacy of their lives. Another source for writing prompts is Blowing Away the State writing Assessment by Jane Bell Keister. Narrative 1. It is 20 years from now. Your name has just been called and you are about to receive an award. Tell the story of how you came to be so successful and win this award. (Gr. 6-12) 2. Rewrite a fairy tale from a different point of view. For instance, * The Three Pigs as the wolf would tell it * Hansel & Gretel as the witch would tell it OR, use any example you like. (Gr. 5-8) 3. Write a story based on one of the following: * Where is it? * Breaking loose * If I had my way ... * Suddenly, in the headlights ... * That noise! * Don't even remind me * The biggest nuisance * Annoying! * At last! (Gr. 5-12) 4. Think of your best or worst day in school. Tell the story of what happened. (Gr. 4 & up) 5. Write a story based on ONE of the following * Little brothers (or sisters) * Older sisters (or brothers) * A narrow escape * My first memory * I'd like to go back * You won't believe it, but ... (Gr. 4 & up) 6. Think of a friend you have, in or out of school. Tell one story that comes to mind when you think of this friend. (All grades) 7. Think of an event you will want to remember when you are old. Tell about what happened in a way that's so clear that if you read this story again when you are eighty, every detail will come flooding back as if it happened y
Nigel Coutts

The art of modern writing - The Learner's Way - 0 views

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    Learning to write is one of the fundamental skills we gain from our time at school. Writing is one of the cornerstones of learning and we devote significant time and energy towards its mastery. Skilled Writing is a mark of an educated individual and a skill required for academic success. But in the modern world what makes a skilled writer? What has changed about Writing and what literary skills should we focus our attention on. 
anonymous

Write or Die : Dr Wicked's Writing Lab - 0 views

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    Write or Die is a web application that encourages writing by punishing the tendency to avoid writing
Rhondda Powling

Teaching Writing With Technology? Blogging, Blogging, Blogging - 3 views

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    Helping students to cultivate the skills needed for writing is often about cultivating a love of writing. Every student needs to be able to express themselves clearly, concisely and intelligently, whatever they are going to end up doing in later life. "The best way to help them develop those skills is to make writing personal and give them a vested interest in communication. Blogs have become one of the most popular website formats in recent years. Blogging websites have become the essential ways for many people to broadcast their personal stories, challenges and insights. This has created both a new generation of budding writers as well as a generation with a keen interest in the stories of others. Blogging offers an immersive experience. Students are simply encouraged to begin a blog chronicling their life story or a subject that ignites their interest. That's when the skills are picked up and developed as a matter of course. The initial blogging assignment should be simple, but at the same time offer a bit of a challenge." Post offers some useful advice about blogging.
Rhondda Powling

10 Ways To Use Technology To Teach Writing - 5 views

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    There are a many technology tools and methods that are available for teaching writing. The 10 are listed here can make the process easier and more enjoyable for both teachers and students.
John Pearce

Teach Collaborative Revision With Google Docs - 4 views

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    "Revision is a critical piece of the writing process-and of your classroom curriculum. Now, Google Docs has partnered with Weekly Reader's writing for Teens magazine to help you teach it in a meaningful and practical way. On this page, you will find several reproducible PDF articles from writing magazine filled with student-friendly tips and techniques for revision. You'll also find a teacher's guide that provides you with ideas for how to use these materials with Google Docs to create innovative lesson plans about revision for your classroom."
Amanda Rablin

Shmoop: Study Guides for Literature, US History, Poems, & Essays - Homework Help and Teaching Resources - 0 views

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    Shmoop wants to make you a better lover (of literature, history, poetry and writing). See many sides to the argument. Find your writing groove. Understand how lit and history are relevant today. We want to show your brain a good time.Our mission: To make learning and writing more fun and relevant for students in the digital age. Shmoop content is written primarily by Ph.D. and Masters students from top universities, like Stanford, Berkeley, Harvard, and Yale. Many of our writers have taught at the high school and college levels. We hold ourselves to the highest academic standards. We source our work (see the "Citations" tab in each history section, or in-line citation links throughout our literature and poetry content). Teachers and students should feel confident to cite Shmoop as a source in essays and papers.
Grace Kat

Writing Online Activity Teacher's Guide - 0 views

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    Writing with Writers units are appropriate for students in grades 9-12. Follow the following links for specific guides for each unit: Biography Writing; Descriptive Writing; Myths; Poetrywith Karla Kuskin; News; Speech; Book Review
Kerry J

HOW TO WRITE GOOD - 17 views

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    some rules of writing...
Rhondda Powling

Tools that Make Writing Easier for Students - Instructional Tech Talk - 3 views

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    "It's not easy to teach students to handle the process of academic writing. Instead of providing vague guidelines and leaving the students to complete papers on their own, teachers should inspire them to come up with ideas, organize them and stick with proper vocabulary when writing the discussion. In this post EdTech lists some tools might be able to help:"
Nigel Coutts

Reflecting on report writing time - How might we maximise the value? - The Learner's Way - 0 views

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    For schools in Australia and many parts of the world, we are heading towards the end of another school term and year. That means report writing season. For the next few weeks, teachers across the country will be huddled in front of computer screens, writing reflections on the progress their learners have made. Mark books will be opened, assessments consulted, work samples will be reviewed. All so that in the first week of the long Summer vacation students can sit and read their report and make plans for how they will enhance their learning in the coming year.
anonymous

The Writing Teacher - Tips, Techniques, and Advice on Teaching Writing - 1 views

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    Our goal is to increase the quality of our students' writing skills by sharing knowledge among experts and practitioners.
Tony Richards

The Atlantic Online | January/February 2010 | What Makes a Great Teacher? | Amanda Ripley - 0 views

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    "What Makes a Great Teacher? Image credit: Veronika Lukasova Also in our Special Report: National: "How America Can Rise Again" Is the nation in terminal decline? Not necessarily. But securing the future will require fixing a system that has become a joke. Video: "One Nation, On Edge" James Fallows talks to Atlantic editor James Bennet about a uniquely American tradition-cycles of despair followed by triumphant rebirths. Interactive Graphic: "The State of the Union Is ..." ... thrifty, overextended, admired, twitchy, filthy, and clean: the nation in numbers. By Rachael Brown Chart: "The Happiness Index" Times were tough in 2009. But according to a cool Facebook app, people were happier. By Justin Miller On August 25, 2008, two little boys walked into public elementary schools in Southeast Washington, D.C. Both boys were African American fifth-graders. The previous spring, both had tested below grade level in math. One walked into Kimball Elementary School and climbed the stairs to Mr. William Taylor's math classroom, a tidy, powder-blue space in which neither the clocks nor most of the electrical outlets worked. The other walked into a very similar classroom a mile away at Plummer Elementary School. In both schools, more than 80 percent of the children received free or reduced-price lunches. At night, all the children went home to the same urban ecosystem, a zip code in which almost a quarter of the families lived below the poverty line and a police district in which somebody was murdered every week or so. Video: Four teachers in Four different classrooms demonstrate methods that work (Courtesy of Teach for America's video archive, available in February at teachingasleadership.org) At the end of the school year, both little boys took the same standardized test given at all D.C. public schools-not a perfect test of their learning, to be sure, but a relatively objective one (and, it's worth noting, not a very hard one). After a year in Mr. Taylo
Rhondda Powling

Phrays | Today's word is Squashy. Now, write a sentence. - 2 views

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    Phrays is a simple site that publishes a new word-of-the-day every day. Each word is published with its definition and part of speech. Visitors to the site are encouraged to write and submit a sentence using that word. Registered users can read the sentences submitted by others and vote for their favourite sentences. If you're in need of a quick writing prompt or vocabulary challenge word for your students.
Rhondda Powling

J.K. Rowling's writing style analyzed [infographic] - 2 views

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    Infographic trying to find patterns in J.K. Rowling's way of writing? Do they change over time? How does The Casual Vacancy differ from Harry Potter novels?
Nirvana Watkins

antipodr - Find the other side of the world! - 0 views

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    My thought for this site is that you could use it to generate an interdisciplinary writing task with students. They select a starting location then find its opposite; the writing task is that they narrate the journey from the starting point to its opposite. They could research the different places they pass through and choose their own line of travel (making it either more realistic or fanciful). Integrated activities might include geography (different environments); mathematics (distance and measurement); science/physics (distance & displacement).
Grace Kat

Paragraph Punch: - 1 views

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    An Interactive Online Paragraph Writing Tutorial Paragraph Punch takes users through the steps of Writing a basic paragraph.
Kerry J

Lightning Bug - 9 views

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    "Your writing partner, helping you write a story from beginning to THE END"
Rhondda Powling

BBC News - Children who use technology are 'better writers' - 7 views

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    Article summarizing recent finding that shows students using technology especially for writing have better core literacy skills. "Children who blog, text or use social networking websites are more confident about their writing skills: - The National Literacy Trust.
Pam Thompson

Story Starters | Scholastic.com - 2 views

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    Ready to write? This Story Starter machine generates creative writing prompts. You never know how your story will start.
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