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Rhondda Powling

How To Choose A Learning Game | MindShift - 0 views

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    Some criteria that could help teachers choose the right learning game for their classroom.
Tony Richards

The Atlantic Online | January/February 2010 | What Makes a Great Teacher? | Amanda Ripley - 0 views

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    "What Makes a Great Teacher? Image credit: Veronika Lukasova Also in our Special Report: National: "How America Can Rise Again" Is the nation in terminal decline? Not necessarily. But securing the future will require fixing a system that has become a joke. Video: "One Nation, On Edge" James Fallows talks to Atlantic editor James Bennet about a uniquely American tradition-cycles of despair followed by triumphant rebirths. Interactive Graphic: "The State of the Union Is ..." ... thrifty, overextended, admired, twitchy, filthy, and clean: the nation in numbers. By Rachael Brown Chart: "The Happiness Index" Times were tough in 2009. But according to a cool Facebook app, people were happier. By Justin Miller On August 25, 2008, two little boys walked into public elementary schools in Southeast Washington, D.C. Both boys were African American fifth-graders. The previous spring, both had tested below grade level in math. One walked into Kimball Elementary School and climbed the stairs to Mr. William Taylor's math classroom, a tidy, powder-blue space in which neither the clocks nor most of the electrical outlets worked. The other walked into a very similar classroom a mile away at Plummer Elementary School. In both schools, more than 80 percent of the children received free or reduced-price lunches. At night, all the children went home to the same urban ecosystem, a zip code in which almost a quarter of the families lived below the poverty line and a police district in which somebody was murdered every week or so. Video: Four teachers in Four different classrooms demonstrate methods that work (Courtesy of Teach for America's video archive, available in February at teachingasleadership.org) At the end of the school year, both little boys took the same standardized test given at all D.C. public schools-not a perfect test of their learning, to be sure, but a relatively objective one (and, it's worth noting, not a very hard one). After a year in Mr. Taylo
Tony Searl

Turning Children into Data - 4 views

  • The teachers understood that learning doesn’t have to be measured in order to be assessed. 
  • It focused on teachers’ personal “connection[s] with our subject area” as the basis for helping students to think “like mathematicians or historians or writers or scientists, instead of drilling them in the vocabulary of those subject areas or breaking down the skills.”  In a word, the teachers put kids before data.
  • All that does is corrupt the measure (unless it’s a test score, in which case it’s already misleading), undermine collaboration among teachers, and make teaching less joyful and therefore less effective by meaningful criteria.
  • ...6 more annotations...
  • kids should have a lot to say about their assessment.
  • we want to create an environment where students can “experience success and failure not as reward and punishment but as information."  
  • students’ desire to learn?
  • The more that students are led to focus on how well they're doing, the less engaged they tend to become with what they're doing. 
  • A school that’s all about achievement and performance is a school that’s not really about discovery and understanding.
  • teachers’ isolation, fatalism, and fear (of demands by clueless officials to raise test scores at any cost).
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    "While some education conferences are genuinely inspiring, others serve mostly to demonstrate how even intelligent educators can be remarkably credulous, nodding agreeably at descriptions of programs that ought to elicit fury or laughter, avidly copying down hollow phrases from a consultant's PowerPoint presentation, awed by anything that's borrowed from the business world or involves digital technology. Many companies and consultants thrive on this credulity, and also on teachers' isolation, fatalism, and fear (of demands by clueless officials to raise test scores at any cost). With a good dose of critical thinking and courage, a willingness to say "This is bad for kids and we won't have any part of it," we could drive these outfits out of business -- and begin to take back our schools."
Kerry J

How to Meet WCAG 2.0 - 1 views

    • Kerry J
       
      Gotta do this!
  • he "sufficient techniques" listed below are considered sufficient to meet the success criteria
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