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mrswalker_

Articles: Presentation "Awakening" - 11 views

  • if your presentation visuals taken in the aggregate (e.g., your “PowerPoint deck”) can be perfectly and completely understood without your narration, then it begs the question: why are you there?
    • rabraham
       
      I think this is a great summary of the information in this article.  It is also easy to remember.  The PowerPoint should be used as a tool, not the entire message.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      So true. This is one of the big shifts in this class, where you purposefully do not put all your info into your ppt, because that takes their attention off of you.
    • vmcgee
       
      I think this statement is something that I can use when I finish putting together a presentation.  If it is such that it can be understood without my narration, then do I need to take up class time going through it?
    • suzdohrer
       
      Why are you (the presenter) there? Great focal point, as I prepare my next PPT.
    • chaneline
       
      This is a great statement.  I know I get so annoyed when someone just reads off the PP.  I want more.
  • Some stick, and others fade away. Why? What the authors found—and explain simply and brilliantly in their book—is that “sticky” ideas have six key principles in common: simplicity, unexpectedness, concreteness, credibility, emotions, and stories. And yes, these six compress nicely into the acronym SUCCESs.
    • rabraham
       
      This message is better remembered as SUCCESs.  I don't think I would remember the principles as easily otherwise.  Each of them is broken down and explained well in the rest of this article.
    • suzdohrer
       
      The use of acronyms is so helpful to learners, of all ages. I'm pleased that the author took time to share this one, too.
  • Second, make slides that reinforce your words, not repeat them. Create slides that demonstrate, with emotional proof, that what you’re saying is true not just accurate.
    • rabraham
       
      I think this is something that needs to be remembered in many presentations.  Why would I listen to a presenter if they are telling me the same thing that is on the screen. I like the idea of making an emotional connection to go along with the message.
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      Agreed, and as the last article stated, you can't take in the verbal information while you are reading.
  • ...32 more annotations...
    • pkmills
       
      Weird thought: I've turned my thinking on this to include slides of how I would make up slide for the rules.
  • The reason you give a presentation is to make a sale. So make it. Don’t leave without a “yes,” or at the very least, a commitment to a date or to future deliverables.
    • rabraham
       
      I like thinking about a presentation as making a sale.  It gives me the extra challenge that the competitive (one of my top 5 strengths) part of me will take on and want to be successful.
  • What makes some presentations absolutely brilliant and others forgettable? If your goal is to create a presentation that is memorable, then you need to consider how you can craft messages that stick.
    • rabraham
       
      This needs to be in the forefront of my mind when presenting to any crowd.  How can I craft messages that stick?
    • aboevers
       
      I think the real problem is that there are too many words on most power points and this is why we tend to read them to students.
  • the diagram uses a visual modality and the speech uses an auditory modality which should result in greater working memory capacity and better understanding, depending, of course, on what is being presented
  • we all want to be sold
    • aboevers
       
      This is true. We want to be sold an idea by the presenter just like we are drawn to the advertising of products.
    • ney4cy
       
      This true of our students. we are trying to "sell" our learning objective or strategy. I always considered a power point of a anvenue to convay information. Did not consider the emotional side or selling it my students.
    • suzdohrer
       
      In the interest of being "green" is there any problem with posting thePPT on a class website, so students can review the slides online.? If so, then is there more reason to include more substance and words, so the PPT is not simply a presentation matter, but it also is a learning tool.
  • , what’s the key point? What’s the core? Why does (or should) it matter?
    • aboevers
       
      There should be a clear purpose to the presentation and that should be made clear to the audience.
    • dougmay
       
      We use I CAN statements everyday. It is very clear due to the fact it is written on the board. Do we need to be that blatant?
  • you must make them feel something.
    • aboevers
       
      This is a lot like advertising!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      In a large way, presentations are like advertising. You need to persuade the audience to care about your message, and then you also need to communicate that message clearly so that they do not misunderstand. Caring requires an appeal to "logos, pathos, and ethos", meaning you need to connect to their emotions and their sense of being a person.
    • mrswalker_
       
      This is especially true in music. Creating connections to personal feelings and the material is key.
  • but for all of us to use the same format
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I'm imagining going to a conference and seeing the same type of Powerpoint over and over again! I don't think I would want to continue going to presentations because the boring factor would be too much for me.
    • ney4cy
       
      I have been witness to something close to this. I was in Las Vegas for a week long PLC Conference and almost every presenter had the same format, slides, clipart. As the week went on I found myself concentrating on the speaker and less on the slides. I fell the message was lost in many presentations.
    • dougmay
       
      I too have been to a seminar like this. We checked out early before the snores started.
    • chaneline
       
      Many people like to come to presentations with a printed out PP, they take notes on them....then recycle them later.  It is a very boring style to have to sit through and I find myself zoning out.
    • mrswalker_
       
      This happened way too often in my college days! Everything looked just the same!
  • Often, people come to a conclusion about your presentation by the time you’re on the second slide.
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      This is a scary thought. You really don't have much time to catch your audience's attention. I would assume, in students this could be even faster!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      I think this line is the most important one in the entire article. We really need to do something different and attention grabbing right away, or we've lost them by slide 2.
  • make yourself cue cards
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      Seems like going back to the basics. This is what we used to do before powerpoint.
    • chaneline
       
      This is something I am going to do.  I was wondering what the audience would think, but it will help to keep me organized.  In the end, I may not need them much.
    • mrswalker_
       
      I don't use cue cards, but I do use the "notes" component of google slides. It helps me review my talking points before I present, but keeps me from reading from cue cards.
  • Don’t hand out print-outs of your slides
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I had always thought this was a good idea. I remember times that I wanted print-outs of a presentation so that I could make notes on them. But, that must be because there are too many words on the slides!
    • ney4cy
       
      I agree, I always tried to get a copy of the presentation. Taking notes on each slide helped me remember the most important ideas. If I try and take notes with the slide it makes no sense to me later. I am not sure how I would do without the handout.
  • mirror the spoken word of the presenter
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      This seems to be the problem, presenters who just read what is on the screen. I had a teacher who, before Powerpoint existed, would have his entire lesson written on overheads and would stand and read them. So very boring!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Wow... that's even worse that ppt reading. I thought overheads were expressed domain of "filling out the worksheet as a class"
    • vmcgee
       
      I guess that is what we are trying to focus on - using the presentation as a tool for the audience rather than as a crutch for the presenter.
  • people can not read and listen well at the same time
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I had not thought about this, but I do find that if I am reading the powerpoint, I am missing what the presenter is saying. At our last meeting I asked one of our teachers if he could repeat his question because I was reading something and had heard the answers but completely missed what the question was
    • Evan Abbey
       
      I have problems with this as well. Whenever there is a lot of text on the screen and I'm in the audience, I invariably find myself just finishing the passage as the person is moving to the next slide, and I've missed everything that they said.
    • ney4cy
       
      This is enlightening! I thought for sure I was ADD! I am constantly missing the verbal information is I concentrate on the text of the slide. It can become an exhausting task during a lengthy presentation.
    • dougmay
       
      Ditto, I thought that I was reaching all types of learners, but I might have been reaching none. WOW
  • Before you go from analog to digital—taking your ideas from sketches on paper and laying them out in PowerPoint o
    • ney4cy
       
      I think this would be a great way to plan out a presentation. Sometimes you just need to start with good old paper and pencil.
    • vmcgee
       
      Yes, I think this would keep the technology "in check."  The technology is then just a tool to aid what I am trying to present rather than the technology controlling how I do my presentation.
    • chaneline
       
      It occurred to me that the act of using pen and paper in an analog way, makes the activity more active and therefore more exciting for the brain.
  • Speak of concrete images, not of vague notions. Proverbs are good, say the Heath brothers, at reducing abstract concepts to concrete, simple, but powerful (and memorable) language.
    • ney4cy
       
      This speaks to me! I think some presenters try to make their presentations unique which translates into complicated, wordy, unfocused. And yes I amone of them! This makes me think of the old saying "Keep It Simple Stupid!"
    • vmcgee
       
      I guess I knew this, but hadn't really thought about it.  Many times in the past when presenting with PowerPoint I have just stopped mid-talk and allowed my students to copy what was on the screen before I continued speaking.
    • vmcgee
       
      Great point here for educators.  Great idea to think of the presentation in terms of the students' brains.  In the past for me the focus of the presentation has been purely on the content.
  • No more than six words on a slide. EVER.
    • dougmay
       
      Even for educational presentations????? That will mean a lot of slides.
    • chaneline
       
      Not sure this is always entirely possible.  Wouldn't it depend on the presentation and what information needed to get across...I may have to break this rule.
  • No dissolves, spins or other transitions.
    • dougmay
       
      I will have to tell my students this.
  • Unexpectedness
    • dougmay
       
      Is this good for presentations for teaching??
    • suzdohrer
       
      Simplicity and concreteness, yes, but I am less sure that unexpected info helps students.
  • Great ideas and presentations have an element of story to them.
    • dougmay
       
      Once again, I question how to always accomplish this in educational presentations.
    • suzdohrer
       
      Why use note cards, when the PPT has a notes area and then you can print the slides with the notes to read or review.
  • IMPORTANT: Don’t hand out the written stuff at the beginning! If you do, people will read the memo while you’re talking and ignore you. Instead, your goal is to get them to sit back, trust you and take in the emotional and intellectual points of your pr
    • pkmills
       
      I have experienced this first hand. I will work at taking this advice and I know I should have better results than in the past.
  • the modality effect shows that ”working memory can be increased by using dual rather than a single modality.” That is, it is more effective to target both the visual and auditory processors of worki
  • Simplicity. If everything is important, then nothing is important. If everything is a priority, then nothing is a priority. You must be ruthless in your efforts to simplify—not dumb down—your message to its absolute core. We’re not talking about stupid sound bites here. Every idea can be reduced to its essential meaning if you work hard enough. For your presentation, what’s the key point? What’s the core? Why does (or should) it matter?
    • mrswalker_
       
      This will really help students figure out what is most important in their learning. By keeping things simple, it also helps the teacher prioritize what is most important to focus on.
  • Images are one way to have audiences not only understand your point better but also have a more visceral and emotional connection to your idea.
    • mrswalker_
       
      This is a great way to connect with young elementary students, especially non-readers or low level readers. 
  • The redundancy effect says that if one form of instruction (such as the spoken word) is intelligible and adequate then providing the same material in another form (such as lines of text on a screen that mimic the words being spoken) are redundant and can actually hurt understanding.
    • chaneline
       
      The redundancy effect is something I hadn't ever thought of but it makes sense.  When something can be read off the screen, our brains kind of turn off the listening part...unless it's novel.
  • PowerPoint as a method. Instead... PowerPoint is a medium
    • aboevers
       
      The word "power" in power point is misleading. There really is no power in it unless you provide it through an active, engaging presentation.
  •  
    I agree this is an important part of the presentation process. Whatever you are presenting about, needs to get to your audience as though you are selling the information, idea, data, etc. Creating interesting, fun, and memorable presentations are more apt to stick with your audience and support what you are presenting-just like marketing!
  • ...3 more comments...
  •  
    I've made this mistake before. If you hand out the information beforehand, your audience knows (to some extent) what you are going to talk about. Therefore, you end up not having their full attention and possibly give away the main points of your presentation that would have been your key factors and "selling" points in the presentation that would have kept your audience attentive to you presenting.
  •  
    This is a great point to remember. If they can just read the powerpoint to get this information, the audience may as well leave. I have said this to myself before and need to remember it when doing my own presentation.
  •  
    When giving a presentation, it is important to get your audiences attention by delivering a strong message, however giving too much information and not allowing your audience to use their own imagination, may be an overload to them and therefore not understand what you are trying to say or not have them same emotions, thoughts, and feelings as you (the presenter) does. Give your audience a strong, clean, precise, and factual presentation, and the rest will do what it needs to do for the audience. I do not feel PowerPoint needs to be ditched, but instead cleaned up drastically and presented in a much more professional and effective manner.
  •  
    I agree with the article-I do not think when Garr says "Is it finally time to ditch PowerPoint?" that he means to get rid of it completely. I think that it may be overused at times and/or used incorrectly as there are certain criteria that is better to follow on PowerPoint than what some people are doing. Knowing the maximum information to put onto each slide, the correct information and format, and how it is used as a presentation, as well as the visuals, all makes a difference in its used and overuse.
  •  
    I really like this part of the article. You have to get your message across to your audience-make them feel the same you do about the topic. This sometimes takes a lot of work, but can be accomplished by putting in some time to create a powerful presentation. Putting into your presentation the emotion and feelings that you have will capture your audiences attention and keep them captivated.
dougmay

Articles: Design - 0 views

  • The less clutter you have on your slide, the more powerful your visual message will become.
    • rabraham
       
      This is something that will help transform presentations.  Keeping it simple will ensure the audience stays engaged.
  • Instead of a copy of your PowerPoint slides, it is far better to prepare a written document which highlights your content from the presentation and expands on that content.
    • rabraham
       
      This is a great way to keep the talking points limited.  I think it will be great to use with students who are absent for the lessons too.
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I was glad to see that they still advise giving a document if the thought is to not give out the slide handouts. This is good for students who are absent.
  • You will be able to notice more extraneous pieces of visual data that can be removed to increase visual clarity and improve communication.
    • rabraham
       
      Slide Sorter view helps you to see the big picture of the entire presentation put together.
  • ...57 more annotations...
  • But including a healthy amount of white space sharpens viewers’ focus by isolating elements.
    • rabraham
       
      This is a key element to remember.
    • dougmay
       
      I wouldn't have thought of this, but this slide looks good. The old thought process was to not have extra space.
  • Highlight the key phrases that you will help you rehearse for your presentation
    • rabraham
       
      This is a good step to simplify what the audiences sees and may keep them interested because they can't simply read the rest of the information.
  • Listeners will get bored very quickly if they are asked to endure slide after slide of animation. For transitions between slides, use no more than two-three different types of transition effects and do not place transition
    • suzdohrer
       
      I've struggled with using animations for transitions and lists. Now I read it may not be worth it. Yeah, back to basics and keep it simple.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      I will admit that I never use animations or transitions in any of my presentations. Not even a subtle fade. Not only is it extra junk, but it can add an hour to your development time. The most I do are builds. If I have a slide with an important point that I want to reveal, I will make two copies of the slide, and delete the "revealed" info on the first one. Then when I advance to the next slide, voila, I have a "transition".
    • dougmay
       
      With my students presentations, It sooooo delayed their presentations with all of their animartions and transitions. I, too, kept thinking of these articles.
  • Gill Sans
  • Cut out the extraneous content. Speak to that content when you present
    • suzdohrer
       
      This is when I move the cut text or additional text notes to the "Notes" section of the powerpoint, below the slide shot. Then, I like to print-out the slides to show the notes for my presentation.
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I was thinking that I would be using the notes area much more too. I've even been using it to keep the information of where I got the image on the slide so that I can decide where to add that later.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      For many people, the notes section is really good. If you haven't tried the presenter view within Power Point, it is worth trying. On your computer, you can see your current slide, the next slide coming up, the notes that you have, and a timer/clock. The audience only sees your slide.
    • ney4cy
       
      I have done so few PowerPoints but this was a great tip. I will be checking out my notes section and presenter for sure.
  • The blurred backgrounds set off the stark white illustrations for quick visual processing:
    • suzdohrer
       
      I do not have an artisticy background, but I now think this blurred background image will be a use ful tool.
  • You can achieve this through consistent type styles, color, image treatment, and element placement throughout the slide deck.
    • suzdohrer
       
      Another artistic point of placement and imagery through cohesiveness. I worry that I do not have the natural talent to put this together on my own, but I do see the real difference.
    • chaneline
       
      Some presenters use lots of different colors, fonts and backgrounds.  May it's just because they can and they haven't taken this course.  The visual clutter distracts from the content and decreases the cohesiveness.
    • mrswalker_
       
      I like creating templates using Google Slides to ensure that colors and fonts translate to all of the slides in a deck.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      We kind of pooh-pooh color and design elements in learning, as though it is just pretty-ness. But, it does have a big effect, and it is worth it to improve one's sense of color combination.
  • If you have a detailed handout or publication for the audience to be passed out after your talk, you need not feel compelled to fill your PowerPoint slides with a great deal of text.
    • mgoodwin5
       
      I think this is a great point. The more I'm reading about what should (or is appropriate) be on a slide for the best presentations, it is better to have less, than more.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Do you think the "after" is important? Is it better to pass it out after or before?
    • ney4cy
       
      interesting point.At the presentation I attend Monday afternoon the speaker handed out a document before he started his talk. in a way I liked being able to dot notes or highlight an idea or concept I wanted to review more closely later, but on the other hand it was very distracting to be leafing through the document trying to find the page that matched up with what he was discussing. I guess I would say it is better to wait till after your talk is done.
  • Use the same font set throughout your entire slide presentation, and use no more than two complementary fonts (e.g., Arial and Arial Bold).
    • mgoodwin5
       
      This is something that we stress to our students, since based on what students will usually do is have many different text fonts and sizes. They tend to use whatever looks best for each slide, instead of having the presentation look more smooth and have a togetherness.
    • mrswalker_
       
      I like using two fonts on slides: one to convey the big idea (title) and another to convey the supporting ideas (text).
    • Evan Abbey
       
      My rule of thumb is no more than two. One for headers, one for text (though I often use the same for each). I use a sans-serif font for my text, and either the same sans-serif font for my headers, or a designer font to communicate a special theme. I never use serif fonts.
    • ney4cy
       
      Okay,Okay no more Comic Sans
  • Use the same font set throughout your entire slide presentation, and use no more than two complementary fonts (e.g., Arial and Arial Bold).
  • Images can be very powerful and effective if used with careful intention.
    • mgoodwin5
       
      This is so true. Many times the image used, is what immediately gets the audiences attention and interest. Images are very powerful. i.e. "A picture is worth a thousand words."
    • mrswalker_
       
      I like the idea of using text over images, but it has to be the right image! This creates one image for students to remember, rather than an idea and an image.
  • Lots of extras actually take away meaning because they become a distraction.
    • mgoodwin5
       
      As goes with the statement, "Less is more." I completely understand that too much can be a distraction for the eye. Too much on a slide, take s away the meaning and I feel it also makes a person wonder what they should focus on, such as what is the most important point I'm supposed to be receiving from this slide?
    • dougmay
       
      Agreed!
  • The first step is admitting that you have a problem
    • mgoodwin5
       
      Many of my slides in my presentations either look like this, or have started out like this. This is exactly what I need to work on! Eliminating some of the bullet points and a lot of text!
  • Depending on your content, you may be able to convert each bullet point into a separate image on one slide or over several slides.
    • mgoodwin5
       
      Here is what I'm going to work towards doing. Since learning about Zen, I realize I'm definitely adding too much to my slides, whether it be text or bullets. By using images, or at least less text and bullets, it appears presentations will be much more appealing and interesting to the audience. I really like the idea of using the images instead of any text at all. Then the presenter (me) will expand on the meaning of the image or what it stands for.
  • Your slides should have plenty of “white space” or “negative space.” Do not feel compelled to fill empty areas on your slide with your logo or other unnecessary graphics or text boxes that do not contribute to better understanding.
    • chaneline
       
      This point has been huge for me.  I really thought I would want to fill up the slide with information, not any more.  I see the power of simplicity of the white or negative space.
    • mrswalker_
       
      This is a great idea- I like the idea of negative space better than white space. My classroom is really bright so light text on a dark background sometimes works better than white.
  • No audience will be excited about a cookie-cutter presentation, and we must therefore shy away from any supporting visuals, such as the ubiquitous PowerPoint Design Template, that suggests your presentation is formulaic or prepackaged.You can make your own background templates which will be more tailored to your needs.
    • chaneline
       
      This lead me to think about use of a white background.  I was so afraid of it because it seemed boring, but with the use of visuals, a white background can be powerful and increase the interest of the slide.
  • Avoid off-the-shelf clip art (though your own sketches & drawings can be a refreshing change if used consistently throughout the visuals).
    • chaneline
       
      Some presenters overuse cartoon type Clipart, maybe because it's easier, that's what they are used to, they are trying to be funny/cute or they haven't learned the power of a visual image/picture within a presentation.  
    • aboevers
       
      I don't think I will be drawing my own art either!
  • Go through your bullet points and try to highlight the main point of each bullet point. Try to bold only the key parts of each point — limit it to as few words as possible.
    • mrswalker_
       
      Great idea to take it step by step rather than just trying to cut a lot of information at once. 
  • Go through your bullet points and try to highlight the main point of each bullet point. Try to bold only the key parts of each point — limit it to as few words as possible.
  • It is very common for people to “brain dump” all of their ideas or thoughts into “stream of consciousness” bullet points as they create slides.
    • chaneline
       
      I think this happens because you want to make sure that all of the points you feel are important are given to the audience.  It has been one of the most eye opening concepts from this course.  I made note cards for my presentation, rather than putting all of the info on the slide. " Redundancy effect" is powerful!
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      Yes, I had always thought bullet points were a good thing! Oh how wrong I was!
    • ney4cy
       
      I thought bullet points would be superior to long connected text or narrative on a slide. I really felt it was the most effective way to get your message out. Now I have seen the light!
    • vmcgee
       
      Me too.  I have been using bullet points extensively all year.  Google slides makes it very easy to do so...
  • The best slides may have no text at all
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      It is interesting to go to presentations while I'm taking this class. I took the ISEA's mandatory reporter training last week and it was an RN on a video with powerpoint slides for 3 hours. Lots of text, the crayon template and a graph that she kept going back to that you couldn't even read due to tiny font. Death by PowerPoint!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      This is true. It also is somewhat of a curse. You can get to the point where you can't see any presentation without being critical of it :)
    • vmcgee
       
      Absolutely.  Just today I had to give a presentation to a class on behalf of another teacher.  It had WAY too much text and I had great difficulty keeping the attention of 13 year old students.  I couldn't help but think of this class while presenting.
    • dougmay
       
      In the past, I would have a hard time with no text. My thought was that the slide should do the work. My students did presentations and I kept wanting to critique their slides.
  • Presenters are usually guilty of including too much data in their on-screen charts
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      This can be tricky when you really need to get all of the data in the hands of your audience. What to leave out?
    • ney4cy
       
      I guess this is where the analog planning is helpful. Along with the elevator test.
  • though your own sketches & drawings can be a refreshing change if used consistently throughout the visuals)
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I had not thought about the use of your own sketches and drawings. I would be afraid that it would look corny, like the clip art, but I'm also intrigued to try this!
    • ney4cy
       
      It does sound interesting. I think it would nice to try student drawings too when using this if educators or students themselves.
  • The trick becomes finding just the right image(s)
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      This is where I feel that I could take hours second guessing my choice of image, or trying to edit it to work.
    • ney4cy
       
      I agree. I have already been out looking, and I just keep looking and looking. I am hoping it will get easier the more experience I have creating PowerPoints.
    • dougmay
       
      This can seem to take more time than the planning.
  • Use high-quality graphics including photographs.
    • mrswalker_
       
      My students LOVE seeing pictures of themselves in a presentation. I try to use student examples as often as possible to create images for presentations.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      This is a great idea! Especially for younger students!
  • But boring an audience with bullet point after bullet point is of little benefit to them
    • aboevers
       
      This reminds me of that first video we watched for this class and the gun image. That has stuck with me and it is all because of the image of the gun!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      I guess this goes to speak of the power of an image.
    • ney4cy
       
      I just sat through a presentation Monday afternoon on PLCs and Short Data Cycle. The presentaer was very engaging but his PowerPoint was not! Too much text and bullets very few images. I found myself critiquing his slides instead of listening to the message!
  • The right color can help persuade and motivate. Studies show that color usage can increase interest and improve learning comprehension and retention
    • aboevers
       
      Color can do so much, like make you feel stronger/weaker, or energize/soothe. That was why they painted our visiting team locker room pink!
  • This looks like they were going for the full-bleed background image effect but just missed
    • aboevers
       
      One of my classrooms has a projector that is slightly to the right and the image bleeds to the white board behind the screen. It is very distracting for me and my students!
  • in your slide deck
    • aboevers
       
      I have recently heard of a presentation set of slides referred to as a deck, but we certainly do not need 52 slides to present!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Well, this depends. Some presenters make one master deck and then "hide" the slides they don't want. For the next preso, they hide different slides. Also, it depends on how you use your slides. If you talk for each slide, then 52 is way to many. But if you are using builds or quick sequences of slides as a substitute for bulleted lists, you can get there pretty quick. My rule of thumb is one slide every two minutes, but I do have one preso with 70 slides in it for a 45 minute preso. It is the exception, not the rule.
    • ney4cy
       
      At a recent in-service the speaker had 3 PowerPoints open he retrieved slides from different presentations based on our dicussion. It made the informtion much more relevant to our school but at the same time created a distraction when he couldn't find a slide and had to flip back and forth.
  • the golden rule of PowerPoint presentations — always do what is right for your audience.
    • aboevers
       
      Shouldn't the rule state, "Present unto others as you would like presented to you?"
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Ha! Hilarious!
  • add unrelated “decorations
    • aboevers
       
      Keep the idea of purpose in mind constantly.
    • ney4cy
       
      This is was my typical slide! ALL bullet points.
    • pkmills
       
      Somehow that simple idea got very lost along the way.
  • “Sorry I missed your presentation. I hear it was great. Can you just send me your PowerPoint slides?” But if they are good slides, they will be of little use without you.
    • pkmills
       
      If someone had said this to me, I would have. Now if they say it to me I still will send them the slides. Ha Ha.
  • You can take your own high-quality photographs with your digital camera,
    • pkmills
       
      I ran into soem object that I need for my presentation that were "iffy" for me in the copyright area, so I decided to take my own pictures instead. I feel great about how it turned out.
  • So make sure your slides pass what I call the glance test: People should be able to comprehend each one in about three seconds
    • pkmills
       
      Love this idea. It's a good way for me to see if I am travelling down the right road.
  • Live long and prosper.
    • pkmills
       
      I found out that "Live long and prosper" was added by Leonard Nimoy for character and was based in his Jewish teachings.
  • By getting out of the Slide View and into the Slide Sorter view, you can see how the logical flow of your presentation is progressing. In this view you may decide to break up one slide into, say, two-three slides so that your presentation has a more natural and logical flow or process.
    • pkmills
       
      I used the sticky notes at the begginnig to check the flow of my presentation. I will use the sorter to check the presentation at the end of the creation process.
  • Try to avoid text-heavy (and sleep inducing) slides like this one
    • vmcgee
       
      I gave a presentation today on behalf of another teacher that was structured much like this slide.  It had too much text and information on it, and I found myself racing to get through it before I lost the attention of my audience.  Afterwards, it completely felt like a waste of time.
  • Not sure what two guys shaking hands in front of a globe has to do with the fertility rate in Japan. Yet even if we were talking about "international partnership" the image is still a cliché.
    • vmcgee
       
      It seems like I have seen some sort of "handshake" image a thousand times.  It is overused and carries no meaning - which I think defeats the purpose of an image in a slide.
  • An audience can’t listen to your presentation and read detailed, text-heavy slides at the same time (not without missing key parts of your message, anyway
    • vmcgee
       
      This is probably the topic that has had the greatest effect on my presentations so far.  I have done about 3 different presentations since this course began, and I am now always concentrating on not having my students read slide material while I talk.
  • Very few audiences enjoy paragraph-length bullet points.
    • dougmay
       
      I can't think of anybody, let alone a few people.
  • It’s okay to cover details verbally that are not reflected in your bullet points.
    • dougmay
       
      I am having a hard time adjusting to this thought. In the past, I wanted to include everything in the slides. Now I thinking of it more of an outline for me.
  • & contains watermark
  • & contains watermark
  • & contains watermark
  • & contains watermark
  • ) Image is of poor quality & contains watermark
  • This introduces distracting visual noi
    • dougmay
       
      Why would anyone do this? How could they think that this is ok?
candace berkley

Articles: Design - 0 views

  • The less clutter you have on your slide, the more powerful your visual message will become.
    • stac34
       
      As a person who likes clean lines and simplicity, I apprecaite this statement. I think less can definitely be more!
    • brendahack
       
      It seems to be proven over and over when we see examples of noise and clear slides.
  • By getting out of the Slide View and into the Slide Sorter view, you can see how the logical flow of your presentation is progressing.
    • stac34
       
      This is a great place to proofread and edit to ensure that the presenatation flows and keeps a common theme throughout. I think that it would be easy to spot slides that need some work when looking at all of them at once.
  • Presenter tiles image
  • ...48 more annotations...
  • 8) Presenter tiles image
  • Presenter tiles image
    • stac34
       
      Do people seriously do this??
  • People should be able to comprehend each one in about three seconds.
    • stac34
       
      This is a good rule of thumb, I think that is why the visual on the page is so important to help quickly understand the content.
    • jsoland
       
      I really like this as well. I have such a difficult time figuring out what text to include. This will definitely help me to minimize and focus on what's really important.
  • What key part of each bullet point do you need to mention during your PowerPoint presentation?
    • stac34
       
      This is a good point when thinking about trying to get closer to the "six words per slide" rule. Keeping in mind the key details can help decrease the use of words that are not needed.
  • convert each bullet point into a separate image
    • stac34
       
      Great idea! After deciding the important details on a slide, rather than just including those find a visual that represents what the bullet points would have siad. The presenter will still have to explain what the visuals mean, but that should happen anyway, much bettter than sentences next to bullet points!
    • brendahack
       
      I like this, but also wonder if it is too noisey. Do you think it could be divided into several slides of reasons, or does that become too many slides?
  • Avoid using PowerPoint Clip Art or other cartoonish line art.
    • KIM BYRD
       
      I have been a sucker over the years to use generic clipart. I thought this was something we could do. Now I know we need to use human images to bring more personal aspects to the presentation.
    • brendahack
       
      :) You are not alone on this one.
  • No audience will be excited about a cookie-cutter presentation
    • KIM BYRD
       
      I absolutely thought using templates were what you were supposed to do. Ooops.
  • Make sure you know the difference between a Serif font (e.g., Times New Roman) and a Sans-Serif font (Helvetica or Arial
    • KIM BYRD
       
      When creating a presentation, so not mix these fonts. The articles stated to stay with Helvetia and Arial with only two colors per slide.
  • Text within images is but one way to use text/data and images harmoniously
    • KIM BYRD
       
      I look forward to trying this out and adding gradian to the picture.
  • Presenters are often tempted to fill it up with additional content that competes for attention
    • KIM BYRD
       
      If I had a photo that contained white space on the edges, I usually put a border around it. I did not realize we were to keep the white space open in order to create "open space" needed in a presentation.
  • “Sorry I missed your presentation. I hear it was great. Can you just send me your PowerPoint slides?” But if they are good slides, they will be of little use without you. Instead of a copy of your PowerPoint slides, it is far better to prepare a written document which highlights your content from the presentation and expands on that content.
    • jsoland
       
      I'm embarassed to admit this, but it had never occured to me to prepare a handout other than a copy of the slides until this course.
  • Clip art is chosen
  • Clip art is chosen
  • Avoid off-the-shelf clip art
    • jsoland
       
      So, this example is pretty extreme in how bad it is, but I'm really starting to dislike anything clipart. It seems it is never appropriate.
    • candace berkley
       
      Wow. This anecdote makes the point very clear: The presentation is to aid the presenter, not replace the presenter.
  • Have a visual theme
    • candace berkley
       
      I get this concept: Theme is established through consistent choices in color, font, placement, images and not through templates.
  • Use color well
    • sarahjmoore
       
      Another issue I have seen with color is the projector. I have seen a lot of pretty presentations that were turned horrible by the projector. My principle was trying to promote some school spirit and had his slide in school colors (purple background and yellow text). Purple backgrounds were turned pure black when projected. It looked ok, but the point was completely missed. I think it is important to keep it simple and test it out if I can before I give it to help prevent that issue. 
  • cheesy sound effects
    • sarahjmoore
       
      This makes me think of my dear education professor in college. He was 70 something and loved teaching. He tried so hard to keep up with the times, and he must have had someone show him the audio buttons because every slide in his presentations would have a different sound effect. It wasn't really engaging, just annoying. But, we all knew how hard he worked and that he truly loved teaching. 
  • entire presentation
    • sarahjmoore
       
      This view will also be more effective without all of the bullets and large chunks of text. 
  • es the image is actually a pretty good one but it just needs a bit of editing so that the text will pop out more.
    • sarahjmoore
       
      This is one of the biggest struggles I have will use full background images. The text doesn't pop like I want it to. I like the idea of adding in the transparent box. 
  • add one relevant image to the slide
    • sarahjmoore
       
      This is where I feel I get stuck. I want them to be more engaging then this, but I also don't want to have simply concept pictures. 
  • with images
    • sarahjmoore
       
      I think this would be really effective if you reveal them as you talk about them creating that flow of content. I know when I first looked at this slide I started to try and understand the meaning of each photo. I would have to force myself as an audience member to wait for the presenter to explain them. 
  • The slides themselves were never meant to be the “star of the show” (the star, of course, is your audience).
    • brendahack
       
      Good to keep in mind. It is not about you or the images you choose, or the words we use. It is about the audience and having them on the journey with us.
  • If you have a detailed handout or publication for the audience to be passed out after your talk, you need not feel compelled to fill your PowerPoint slides with a great deal of text
    • brendahack
       
      I am excited to present with this point in mind. I know it will be different, but I think it will be a good different.
  • Some animation is a good thing, but stick to the most subtle and professional (similar to what you might see on the evening TV news broadcast).
    • brendahack
       
      I am still thinking about this. How much is too much? This statement of what you might see on the evening news is helpful. I do think some animation, like fade, does make it flow and perhaps more interesting, but you can definately have too much of a good thing.
  • Pretend as though you are an audience member for your upcoming presentation. Do any slides feel text heavy? Be honest with yourself. Remember the golden rule of PowerPoint presentations — always do what is right for your audience. Very few audiences enjoy paragraph-length bullet points.
    • brendahack
       
      I have certainly been gulity of this. How small can I make the font to get it all to fit on one slide. Find the main message and clear away the rest.
  • Think of your slides as billboards. When people drive, they only briefly take their eyes off their main focus — the road — to process billboard information. Similarly, your audience should focus intently on what you’re saying, looking only briefly at your slides when you display them.
    • brendahack
       
      Keep it simple. Over and over, probably the most powerful message throughout. I really think they made the point with the bill board analogy.
    • aneppl
       
      Very good point. On Wednesday when I presented I had a very minimal powerpoint, 12 total slides for the hour. But I was talking, sharing stories, had humor, and had plenty of table discussions. Slowly I can get better at this
  • Here, for example, your eye takes in the cluster of grapes, then moves to the message about quality, and then focuses on one beautiful grape from the “yield”:
    • brendahack
       
      Great example. Rather like painting. You want to have the eye move from one spot to the other, dicovering your message as they go. Nice!
  • So when adding elements to your slides, have a good reason:
    • jsoland
       
      I think this is important for images as well as text. I need to keep in mind that sometimes just having the words on a slide can be as powerful as an image.
  • It’s functioning like a teleprompter
    • jsoland
       
      We always need to keep in mind that the presentation and slides are for the audience, not the presenter. If we need a teleprompter than we don't know the material enough to be presenting.
  • you’re just reading the slides to your audience. Boring.
    • aneppl
       
      I'm learning slowly. This morning in a presentation, I still had one slide that was heavy in text. For a split second I almost starting reading, but then I paused and let staff read it to themselves. Then we went on. I survived.
  • In some cases, the bullet points may not be conducive to matching visuals
  • In some cases, the bullet points may not be conducive to matching visual
  • In some cases, the bullet points may not be conducive to matching visuals
  • In some cases, the bullet points may not be conducive to matching visuals
    • aneppl
       
      Do you need the bulleted list at all in the below slide? The magazine cover would serve as the reminder to both the presenter and audience on the main topics. 
  • your logo
    • aneppl
       
      For several years our district required us to use "approved" powerpoint templates. At first I thought they were kind of cool, I was proud of the district for being so professional right! But as I developed more and more presentations, it was sometimes hard to fit all the text on the slides I wanted. Well...now I know better, both the templates and the extensive text are not appropriate. We pretty much use google presentations now so I need to learn more about using blank templates within google. 
  • If the photographic image is secondary in importance, then I decrease the opacity and add a Gaussian Blur or motion filter in Photoshop
    • aneppl
       
      It totally understand this and given my art and computer background I know I could do this. However, I am a long way from seeming to have time to do this when some of our presentations are literally being built leading right up to the presentation...Planning is key
  • You can give a good presentation without any images at all, but if you do use images in slides, try to keep these eleven tips in mind.
    • aneppl
       
      So if there are times where it might be ok to use clip art, would it be recommended to use clip art throughout the presentation rather than switching between photos/images and clipart?
    • aneppl
       
      Not that I want to use any clip art...
  • Similarly, your audience should focus intently on what you’re saying, looking only briefly at your slides when you display them.
  • Similarly, your audience should focus intently on what you’re saying, looking only briefly at your slides when you display them
  • Similarly, your audience should focus intently on what you’re saying, looking only briefly at your slides when you display them
  • Photos should be taken by the same photographer or look as if they are. Illustrations should be done in the same style.
    • aneppl
       
      This kind of answers my question from the end of the previous article...consistency is good. 
  • White space is the open space surrounding items of interest
    • aneppl
       
      The white space was one of the things I liked about using Prezi.
  • Aim for something like this simple slide above.
  • But if you plan to keep most of the lights on (which is highly advisable) then a white background with black or dark text works much better. In rooms with a good deal of ambient light, a screen image with a dark background and light text tends to washout, but dark text on a light background will maintain its visual intensity a bit better.Learn more:
    • candace berkley
       
      I have never considered the amount of light in the room and how that might affect the presentation. I will have to experiment with lights on and lights off to see if I can detect any difference.
    • candace berkley
       
      really like the simplicity of this slide and how powerful that percentage becomes by enlarging the font and minimizing the amount of words.
    • candace berkley
       
      How many times have I seen students use the same old graphics in presentations? I need to direct them to other sources, such as some of the ones available through Heartland. How do you help them find unique graphics (or not to be satisfied with using the same graphics as everyone else)?
aneppl

Articles: Preparation - 0 views

  • If your audience could remember only three things about your presentation,what would you want it to be?
    • stac34
       
      I think this is a great question to ask yourself when planning a presenation. To make it purposeful, you want to think about what others will gain from the presentation.
    • jsoland
       
      I love this as well. I think it will really help me to focus on what truly is important and help me to limit all the other content that I may have thought was needed, but would just take away from the presentation.
    • KIM BYRD
       
      This is a very good way to think about your presentation. This will help us make sure it is not too long.
  • he analog approach (paper or whiteboard) to sketch out my ideas and create a rough storyboard really helps solidify and simplify my message in my own head.
    • stac34
       
      I like the idea of this, but realistically so much of what i do is digital, I plan so much on Google Docs so I can access my thoughts from any of my devices. Maybe I should try going analog to see if mind mapping like that is beneficial for me.
  • We do not tell a story from memory alone; we do not need to memorize a story that has meaning to us. If it is real, then it is in us.
    • stac34
       
      Yes. This. I have sat through presenatations where others are just sharing information and I have presented when I have been assigned a slide or two to present. I have received excellent feedback when I have been able to present about a topic that I am passionate about and connected to. When I can share why it is important to me the message is so much easier to get across. I'm trying to think about how traditional required PD can be reformatted to include more story telling.
  • ...44 more annotations...
  • en is the optimal number of slides in
    • stac34
       
      I kinda shudder when I think about how many presentations I have given that are 30, 40 even 50 slides long (in a day long class) and how overwhelmed people must be. I like that it lays out what the ten topics are, but I would be interested to know what this would look like with education topics.
    • sarahjmoore
       
      I agree that it would be very interesting to see what this list would be in education topics. I wonder if you would need a broader scope too because of the different audiences. I also wonder about our students and how they are handling even 10 slides perhaps 8 times a day depending on their workload! 
    • Evan Abbey
       
      This is a good point. We consider just our audience for our presentation, but what if they are absorbing presentations all day long?
    • brendahack
       
      When I wrote the list of 10 down, I wondered what the translation from business model to education might look like. Anyone give it a shot?
  • meeting
  • a PowerPoint presentation because a normal human being cannot comprehend more than ten concepts in a
  • Documentaries do not simply tell facts; rather, they engage us with the story of war, scientific discovery, a dramatic sea rescue, climate change, and so on
    • stac34
       
      This is good to realize that it can be a heavy subject or a non fiction topic and still be covered through the format of storytelling. If our brains naturally gravitate towards stories, then the audience is automatically at a higher level of engagement.
  • Do not fall into the trap of thinking that in order for your audience to understand anything, you must tell them everything.
    • jsoland
       
      I am guilty of this. In previous articles, it also highlighted the importance of restraint in information, but I struggle to identify what is and isn't important to someone else.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Me too. It is hard to say "this is important, but not something I need to tell them."
  • No software to get in my way and I can easily see how the flow will go. I draw sample images that I can use to support a particular point, say, a pie chart here, a photo there, perhaps a line graph in this section and so on.
    • jsoland
       
      This resonates with me because I have always found myself scrambling to find images in the past to fit a slide without really purposely planning what the image should be. My focus was the reverse of what it should have been. I should be focusing on what image to use to illustrate the content.
  • “Statistics are used to tell lies...while accounting reports are often BS in a ball gown.”
    • jsoland
       
      I find this quote funny as we used to joke all the time in graduate school that you could make stats say anything you wanted. I think people look at numbers and just take them to be the truth without realizing that number can be manipulated as well.
  • Use visuals in an active way, not a decorative one.
    • jsoland
       
      This is a theme that I'm seeing throughout the course and probably one of my biggest take aways as I have always thought of visuals as a compliment to the text on the screen rather than being the primary focus.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      This takes practice. I'm better at this, but even when I pick really stunning visuals and use them full-slide like we'll look at in our next section, that doesn't mean that they reinforce the message I'm trying to send.
  • You should give your ten slides in twenty minutes.
    • KIM BYRD
       
      I need to try to remember this in my next presentation. Sometimes I have so much to say, i need to make sure I cut down the information.
  • The best presenters illustrate their points with the use of stories, most often personal ones
    • KIM BYRD
       
      I thought i was interesting reading that you should include your personal life, like you kids and family. All within ten slides! Yikes!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      True, but I wouldn't make slides for my personal anecdotes. They would simply weave into the overall story that I'm making with my presentation.
    • brendahack
       
      I was surprised by the inclusion of persoanl life, but it does create a connection with your audience.
    • candace berkley
       
      Yes, again, like writing compositions, personal anecdotes are a great way to support claims.
  • A good story is not the beginning-to-end tale of how results meet expectations
    • KIM BYRD
       
      We must remember to add SUSPENSE! :)
  • Visuals should be big, bold, clear, and easy to see.
    • KIM BYRD
       
      The articles stated that less is more. Ten slides, twenty minutes, and thirty point font.
  • I suggest you start your planning in “analog mode.”
    • KIM BYRD
       
      I liked the idea of using post-its before you start building your presentation. This helps to simplfy and organize your ideas.
  • Thirty-point font.
    • sarahjmoore
       
      This is hard in a classroom. Especially if the powerpoint is being used to give concepts or information. I completely understand the concept from a true presentation standpoint, but I wonder about what it looks like as an educational tool for students.
  • The brain cares about story.
    • sarahjmoore
       
      I have found that this also works when you are trying to explain a concept to a struggling student. If you can give them a story they can understand (be it true or not) the brain can catch on to it faster and make sense of the concept. Truly powerful!
  • do not simply tell facts;
  • “tell the story” o
    • sarahjmoore
       
      My department has added in a unit on documentary and bias to get to this very point. The idea is that they are telling the story they want to tell. They have little-to-no obligation to tell us the truth. Stories are used to make us think and decided what we think is right or wrong. They are a conversation starter, not a conclusion. Thus, if we were to end out presentation with a story, we perhaps would begin the conversation for them to have after the presentation is over. It could be very powerful. 
  • “data dump.” A data dump — all too common unfortunately
    • sarahjmoore
       
      I wonder if this is why the presentations in the educational world struggle so much. For the most part, they are used to give information or data. Then the discussion comes based off of that. I sat through 3 presentations today that did just that. I find myself struggling with the two concepts of zen and content. What is the balance that is truly needed?
    • Evan Abbey
       
      The weird thing is, we don't teach like that in our classes, do we? I mean, yeah, we all know of that boring lecturer, but that's more of a college professor thing than a common high school teacher thing. You would think education presentations would be more "fluffy touchy feely" without any tangible data/information than the other way around, but you'd be wrong.
  • Introduce the problem you have (or did have) and how you will solve it (or did solve it). Give examples that are meaningful and relevant to your audience. Remember, story is sequential: “This happened, and then this happened, and therefore this happened, and so on.” Take people on a journey that introduces conflict and then resolves that conflict. If you can do this, you will be miles ahead of most presenters who simply recall talking points and broadcast lists of information
    • brendahack
       
      If I can get to this point, I will feel successful. I have been reflecting on the presentation that I am working on, and realized when I am teaching students I have done this, but not intentionally. I plan to use a personal story that demonstrates the power of the information I will be presenting. What I am finding challenging is selecting the "right" image to show the emotion I want to invoke. Since this is content that I am very familar with, I am not concerned about bullets, or list of info, but I feel the challenge of getting it all flowing.
  • I am evangelizing the 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint. It’s quite simple: a PowerPoint presentation should have ten slides, last no more than twenty minutes, and contain no font smaller than thirty points.
    • brendahack
       
      So much power in so few words! Pass the elevator test? yep. 10 slides, a bit scary, but do-able, 20 minutes about what I can expect from students, but when presenting to peers, it is generally much more. However that can be broken up with activities and group work, individual work and check for understanding, in addition to just the power point. I like that font syle and size are being addressed. I play around with that too much, not sure if I have it right, so now I have a tool to guide me. Thanks.
    • aneppl
       
      This makes me think about the importance of a "mini-lesson" in whole group. The term mini-lesson for some has not aligned for the length of their lesson. 10-20 minutes for a whole group lesson on inferencing should be the target
  • Force yourself to use no font smaller than thirty points. I guarantee it will make your presentations better because it requires you to find the most salient points and to know how to explain them well. If “thirty points,” is too dogmatic, the I offer you an algorithm: find out the age of the oldest person in your audience and divide it by two. That’s your optimal font size.
    • brendahack
       
      I love it! I am going to play this game in class, how old are you, wait a minute, slides adjusted to "correct" font. Seriously, in adult education this is a big issue. No one wants to admit that they can't read the slides because the font is too small. Ego?
    • candace berkley
       
      This reminds me of learning targets: What do we want students to know/do? How will we get them there? How will we know when they get there? (This is the second time I have tried to post this comment. The first one was much better composed! Learning curve...)
  • if your presentation is not based on solid content, you can not succeed.
    • candace berkley
       
      Occasionally, I need to remind myself of the purpose for using technology in my classroom: To enhance student learning, not to entertain students (or myself) or just simply to accomplish a task in a different way. I would like to use technology to push kids to a higher level of learning.
    • candace berkley
       
      I don't know why I never considered pre-writing and making a rough draft for a presentation. When I write anything else, I always follow an "analog mode," but with presentations I just jump right in.
    • candace berkley
       
      I tell my AP Composition students that when they write, they should always be able to answer the big "So what?" Why is this issue serious? Why should it be taken seriously? What makes it relevant? I am now seeing that composing a presentation is not so different from a rhetorical composition. Interesting.
  • If we know our material well and have rehearsed the flow, know what slide is next in the deck, and have anticipated questions, then we have eliminated much (but not all) of the unknown.
    • candace berkley
       
      Nothing worse than a slide that is out of place, a visual that pops up at the wrong moment, or when what you are saying is totally incongruous to what is on the slide. Practice in front of your family, colleagues, friends and have them give a little input to help the presentation go smoothly.
    • candace berkley
       
      Nothing worse than being surprised when a slide is out of sequence, the wrong visual appears, or what you are talking about is incongruous to what the slide shows. Practice with your family at home, your dog, imaginary audience.
  • “people are not inspired to act on reason alone.”
    • candace berkley
       
      Yes: logos, ethos, pathos.
  • ven R2D2 and C3PO are engaging characters, in large part because of their strikingly different personalities.
  • n your own presentations, look for contrasts such as before/after, past/future, now/then, problem/solution, strife/peace, growth/decline, pessimism/optimism, and so on. Highlighting contrasts is a natural way to bring the audience into your story and make your message more memorable.
    • candace berkley
       
      Something very basic (and simple!) to remember when it is time to work on the presentation. I like these kinds of very clear statements as I can visualize what the examples might look like in a presentation.
  • Make your presentation—visuals and narration—participatory.
    • candace berkley
       
      This entire section was really interesting. I never thought of a presentation as a kind of narrative performance, story telling. And participatory. Very cool to think of presentations using these ideas. I also like the conciseness of these 5 points.
  • ou believe in y
    • candace berkley
       
      Authenticity is vital to establish a connection with the audience.
  • t reads ahead of you because it can read faster than you can speak. The result is that you and the audience are out of synch.
    • candace berkley
       
      So true. Students will quickly read what is put before them and not pay attention to anything else that is happening, and then they wait for the next thing to read
  • (or from a scheduled one hour to 30 minutes)
    • aneppl
       
      On Monday we had a professional development day. We had over planned for content, but when we scrambled (in front of our staff) on what to cut out so we could still send the teachers off to lunch when we promised we unintentionally cut out the section titled "the importance of a wrap-up or closure" within their literacy workshop model. In other words we actually practiced the opposite of what one of our most important points was to be for the presentation....ugh!
  • examples to support your major points
    • aneppl
       
      I have often told stories, sometimes personal and sometimes passionate. What I often miss is making the link or connection to our focus. I need to be more purposeful with making that connection.
  • “and the key to their hearts is story.”
    • aneppl
       
      This year this has been more challenging as I am with an entirely new staff that has come together in new building. In my previous position, my stories or sharing of personal challenges lead to a level of trust with staff. They were used to my personal approach, and I get the feeling the new staff I work with are not used to the principal showing emotion, sharing personal information or challenges.
  • Allow graphic elements to fill the frame and bleed off the edges.
    • aneppl
       
      I just did this on a slide for a presentation on Monday. Instead of the graphic/picture just being to the right of the text, I made the picture the entire background an ended up with just a few words.
  • What is the purpose of the event?
    • aneppl
       
      So critical - I truly believe teachers need to know the purpose and how the learning or new information will impact them or their students. For me, the purpose is almost related to improved student learning - making the clear connection is the challenge...
  • legal pad and pen
joyisuful

Articles: Design - 12 views

  • The best slides may have no text at all.
    • mnollsch
       
      NO words at all will challenge me since I am so verbal.  But I can see the value in it.
    • kbelland21
       
      I agree. I thought this point was interesting. I never thought of not having any text on a slide.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      No words?! This is good though, I have often thought how I can encourage my to take notes and I hate giving out my presentations.  This will do it!  
    • Evan Abbey
       
      No words is definitely outside of the box type thinking. It also requires you to have a great interplay with your visuals.
    • fshellabarger
       
      I LOVE this! It would be great for setting a stage for a story with a single image. No words needed! If there's no text, your audience can really listen to your words while taking in the image instead of trying to read and listen.
    • tjbudd
       
      I'm lucky enough to have access to good images (photography is a family hobby) and access to photoshop. This is much tougher without the right tools.
    • nettiemarie
       
      this is challenging but an interesting thought... would work for a dramatic statement
    • pattyharris123
       
      I am very verbal, also, but also put a great deal on slides. This is going to be a good challenge for me!
  • But if they are good slides, they will be of little use without you. Instead of a copy of your PowerPoint slides, it is far better to prepare a written document which highlights your content from the presentation and expands on that content.
    • mnollsch
       
      This reinforces my thinking to go back to providing a notes page and then editing my powerpoints to make them simpler.
    • mnollsch
       
      These slides are helpful examples
    • pattyharris123
       
      I always thought "good" slides had good content. It makes sense that you should put little on the slides and then talk about the content, rather than load the slide with info.
  • ...59 more annotations...
  • try to highlight the main point of each bullet point. Try to bold only the key parts of each point — limit it to as few words as possible.
    • mnollsch
       
      Good tip.  I found in looking at many of my presentations I had already highlighted key words.  So why did I add all the other text?
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      This is a helpful idea, I have never thought to do this before.
    • we4nails
       
      I agree - this is a really logical way to pair down my wordy slides without loosing important content. It also encourages note taking in the right way for students.
    • pattyharris123
       
      Occasionally, I have highlighted text on a slide, but I thought I was only putting relevant information on the slide with lots of bullets. Ugh. I could have probably gotten by (I now know I could have) with only putting the hightlighted word and another word or two on the slide, instead.
    • mnollsch
       
      So much about PP I don't know how to do! I think it's time to take an advance PP class.
    • pattyharris123
       
      I have realized the same. I thought I knew PP pretty well, but starting to work on these new slides (and all the new information) has almost blown me away! I have a friend who just aced a college PP class - I am hoping she can help me work through some of the "new" stuff to me. I don't want PP to be too time comsuming, but I want them to be effective.
  • I often use images of people in my slides, as photography of people tends to help the audience connect with the slide on a more emotional level.
    • kbelland21
       
      Makes sense when trying to tell a story and connect with the audience on an emotional level.
    • pattyharris123
       
      I definitely need to switch over to photography. I tend to use cutesy images. Not really sure why other than I like them. Using photos would bring a point home now if the right image is used.
  • People should be able to comprehend each one in about three seconds.
    • kbelland21
       
      Good rule of thumb.
    • Patty Harrell
       
      3 seconds - will be a challenge.I will really have to try to think about  the audience and what might attract their attention..
    • Evan Abbey
       
      If it takes longer, then I think a presenter should be quiet and give them time. It isn't that we can't give some silent time to read... it is just that we don't like to, I think.
    • david moeller
       
      Three seconds seems like a good time to transition anyway. 3 seconds of quite between slides, audience gets the glance and then the presenter talks...
    • tjbudd
       
      I struggle with this when I present charts and graphs. The takeaway is to simplify the graph or chart to highlight what I'm trying to say.
    • pattyharris123
       
      We shouldn't need the time to read with only a few words on the slide. I like to give that "wait time" AFTER I have spoken. Still work work the same way - giving the audience time to comprehend.
  • Remember the golden rule of PowerPoint presentations — always do what is right for your audience.
    • kbelland21
       
      When creating and preparing for a presentation, it is important to put yourself in the position of the audience.
  • It’s okay to cover details verbally that are not reflected in your bullet points.
    • kbelland21
       
      I am guilty of including a lot of information on presentations. I need to remember that I can include information that is not a bullet point.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      This is a pretty straightforward example of this process. It really isn't too hard once it is laid out like this, but it isn't a natural step for me either.
  • convert each bullet point into a separate image
    • kbelland21
       
      Great idea if it is possible with the slide content.
    • pattyharris123
       
      In my opinion, the slide would get too cluttered and distracting to do this.
  • Think of your slides as billboards. When people drive, they only briefly take their eyes off their main focus — the road — to process billboard information
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      This is a good correlation and great tip.  
    • we4nails
       
      I agree, this is one of my favorite tips so far, it made me rethink a couple of my slides!
  • So when adding elements to your slides, have a good reason: Does the audience need to see your logo on each slide to remember who you work for? Does that blue swoosh add meaning? If not, leave it off
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      This is good information and should be done during the 'analog' stage.
    • tjbudd
       
      This one is tough because some companies demand the logo be placed on slides.
  • If they fall below 24 pt then you might be on to something. Also, look at the number of lines you use for your bullet points. If you use more than two lines anywhere, then they’re definitely leaning text heavy.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      Good guideline for checking up on myself.
  • Nothing in your slide should be superfluous, ever.
  • Follow these steps to reduce and simplify your text-heavy bullet points
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      I like the steps used in this process.  I think the most challenging part of designing presentations is figuring out what is most important.  This seems so helpful in making those decisions.  
    • pattyharris123
       
      The most challenging part of design would be figuring out what to use to engage the audience (ie photograph). If we have the end design in mind, and know what our main points are, the text should be easily simplified.
    • Patty Harrell
       
      Not sure how I will manage to leave superfluous behind. I'm so used to looking for ways to incorporate it. I do agree  it would improve presentation when I think about what I like to see when I am listening to a presentation. 
  • Instead of a copy of your PowerPoint slides, it is far better to prepare a written document which highlights your content from the presentation and expands on that content.
    • Patty Harrell
       
      YIKES! both of these look impossible! I have listened to presentations like this and the presenter doesn't always read them and I can't see them well enough to read-it's very frustrating. Eye chart is exactly what I think of.
  • Use high-quality graphics including photographs.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      Coming from an art teacher, this is GREAT advice!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Even coming from a very non-artistic person... this is GREAT advice! I couldn't make art when I try, but I can make crap... which means I know crappy visuals when I see them :)
    • pattyharris123
       
      This IS great advice, but...I will miss the cutesy graphics. (Just kidding.) Looking for the higher quality graphics that are appropriate is going to take some time.
  • “Wipe Left-to-Right” (from the “Animations” menu) is good for a bullet point
  • The right color can help persuade and motivate.
    • pattyharris123
       
      I never really thought about this before for a presention. However, I know when I dress for certain events, I look for outfits of a certain color so it only makes sense that this would be even more appropriate for presentations!
  • color usage can increase interest and improve learning comprehension and retention.
  • Cool colors work best for backgrounds
  • Warm colors generally work best for objects in the foreground (
  • white background with black or dark text works much better.
  • San-serif fonts are generally best for PowerPoint presentations,
  • video clips to show concrete examples promotes active cognitive processing, which is the natural way people learn.
  • people comprehend better when information is presented in small chunks or segments.
  • Spend time in the slide sorter
    • Patty Harrell
       
      There is a first time for everything. I have not ever done this, but it makes good sense, so I will start using it.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      I think this is true for many people. Power Point used to not let you re-arrange slides from the normal view (via that sidebar). You had to go to this view to re-arrange things. Then it got easier to use. The slide sorter is a tool that encourages a creative look at the big picture of one's presentation
  • extras actually take away meaning
    • Patty Harrell
       
      I want their attention to be focused and not distraccted by "extras" I better remember this.
  • including a healthy amount of white space sharpens viewers’ focus
    • tjbudd
       
      Good point. Leaving white space seems like wasting valuable real estate for presenting our message but in reality, the white space makes understanding our message easier.
  • This is all too common.
    • Patty Harrell
       
      Another thing I am guilty of although I usually just don't use these, but I'm not sure how to do this correctly. 
    • tjbudd
       
      I see this very commonly. Presenters don't take the time to find quality images. They google a topic and pull very low resolution photos to include in their presentation. The resolution is fine for a website but grainy when displayed large.
  • what's your intention?
    • Patty Harrell
       
      Why am I using this image? If I can't answer that clearly-I need to pick another.
  • Your slides should have plenty of “white space” or “negative space.”
    • we4nails
       
      I teach students about the parallel of white space with rests in music, I never thought about how that should be used in presentations before!
  • Best if you limit the bars to 4-8.
    • we4nails
       
      This is helpful to me, as I like to use charts, but have a hard time determining where to stop with information - balancing the need to know with the why do I care.
  • You can achieve this through consistent type styles, color, image treatment, and element placement throughout the slide deck
    • we4nails
       
      Again, I like the idea of consistency without the use of the templates. We are often drawn to the templates because they are consistent, but there are so many other ways to create the same effect.
  • relevant
    • we4nails
       
      I need to remember that this means relevant to the AUDIENCE!
  • Now the software background template can be seen just enough to become a bit of noise
  • Have a visual theme, but avoid using PowerPoint templates
    • david moeller
       
      It's interesting that the software we use to create presentations has bad presentation templates..
    • pattyharris123
       
      The templates were one of my original "draws" to PowerPoint. They made things so easy to get started.