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bkoller86

PLE Articles - 2 views

  • These tools provide a medium for students to create their own learning space that is more natural and unique to their interests and learning styles.
    • djarends
       
      I like this idea with special education students. I think to have a place where they can find resources to help them is a great idea. I have provided many resources, but since they are not easily available or at least the students feel they are not, the students do not use them. I also like that they choose which ones will be helpful to them.  I can't wait to try this.
  • teachers must learn to effectively incorporate these social media based initiatives into their lessons.
    • djarends
       
      A concern for me. I have grown greatly in my skills with technology, but it still takes me time to learn the skills and how to implement into my classroom on top of all the new initiatives that the district is adding to our plates. I'm diving in but concerned. 
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      I agree! It seems as I master something new in the area of technology, something bigger and better takes its place. Hard to keep up with technology in the education world.
    • kbolinger
       
      It is hard to keep up, and it takes time to implement anything new into a classroom, even with students that are pretty techie. In my experience with younger students, most of them need a lot of instruction and guided practice before they feel comfortable working independently.
  • Not every student is ready for this responsibility, so teachers need to have strategies in place to guide and support these learners.
    • djarends
       
      This is true of all learning resources.We need to teach students how to use the tools we give them or allow them to find. Knowing this will allow me to prepare a lesson(s) on how to use PLEs. 
  • ...18 more annotations...
  • I’ll continue to collect feedback from students on how this learning tool is working for them and how they are using it for themselves as well as within their groups
    • djarends
       
      I like how the author collects feedback on the usefulness of the tool. I have done this many times. As I approach Symbaloo, I will remember to ask students for things that worked for them and concerns. 
    • bkoller86
       
      I would be interested in how many students use Symbaloo on future projects that doesn't require its use. 
  • I’ve been slow to use tools and develop skills for managing online resource, such as the use of vehicles like Symbaloo, Evernote, or Diigo
    • djarends
       
      That is me! I have used Evernotes with students and like it. I have loved using Diigo. I plan on teaching students how to use it. I'm excited to try Symbaloo. Next step, figure out how to implement.
  • The concept of PLE is not a way to replace classroom learning, but to enhance it.
    • anonymous
       
      As a higher level Spanish teacher, every year I am trying to incorporate a system or resources that can allow students to go to a deeper and higher level of their language learning. Some students want to go on to minor and become more fluent, while others just want the credit. I'm hoping that a PLE can reach those students to dig deeper to become more fluent and culturally aware!
  • It’s easy to use A learner can pull information that’s personally useful to him/her Learners can personalize tiles to make them easy to spot Learners can add to, and draw from, a community of webmixes Interactivity + personalization = fun Instructional uses for Symbaloo include using Symbaloo to help learners create: A personal learning environment (PLE) with personal knowledge management (PKM) tools An eportfolio A collection of resources related to a problem-based learning challenge
    • anonymous
       
      I have created quite a few symbaloos and knew it was a cool tool but never knew how to incorporate those into my classes for students to use - I'm super excited to know how to set this up so that they can access my webpage see what they need to do on a daily/weekly basis and then have resources right there to help them do what they need to do. Can't wait to try for fall:)! 
  • you can create tiles that link to challenges, quiz questions, polls, discussion forums, chat pages, and other types of content and media that will facilitate more student involvement and creativity. You can provide a tile linking to a web page describing a number  of exploratory activities a student will need to engage in, but make the path for accomplishing these activities (e.g., the numbers and types of tiles used) up to the student.
    • anonymous
       
      Love the idea of creating a path for students... could there be a digital checklist also? Teacher could guide students for all class Kahoot game or other challenges. Students can also add a presentation/doc tile to prove their learning - love that, also. Great for project based, research and problem solving activities.  
    • bkoller86
       
      I like the idea of the students having the resources to take responsibility of the learning, and they can review and learn at their own pace. It is like a one stop shop.
  • students had to subscribe to news feeds and blogs, discern the value of social bookmarks, and set up the aggregator to manage all the Internet resources.
    • anonymous
       
      I am very unfamiliar with how to use news feeds and blogs with students - this would be something I would need an inservice for and how it can be put into a language classroom...
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      Me too! I would need training on how to implement in the classroom.
  • Many students in the first class that tried Symbaloo today commented that they liked the clean, visual interface of Symbaloo and the ease of adding content; they also liked that they could customize the “tiles” they were adding and that their webmixes loaded quickly.
    • anonymous
       
      I can see my students setting up their own symbaloo (I can have them add my webmix to their account!) based on their skills needed to practice or go beyond for Spanish (vocabulary, grammar, culture, then speaking, writing, listening acts, readings)
  • students could demonstrate their learning through their PLE by creating blogs, wikispaces, prezi presentations and photo collages as final projects; thereby diversifying instruction. Some instructors empower students to use their own mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones as a means to create PLEs.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      in some cases will students become more proficient than their instructors, especially in the case of technology?
  • The notion of a PLE for students, grounding them intentionally in an environment of information tools and productive applications, is a great way to seek, develop, and structure that balanced approach.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      I am inspired by PLEs and what's happening with them in education. I worry about schools who are not 1:1 with technology and/or students who don't have personal devices of their own.
  • Teachers, she explains, are no longer the primary or even the best source of information available to students, and our work must increasingly attend to supporting students in developing their skills and motivations for becoming themselves networked and sophisticated online learners.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      Teacher's are not experts in all areas. In PLEs they serve as facilitators. I love my ah-ha moments when I learn something new from a student.
    • kbolinger
       
      The teacher's role in student learning looks very different in a PLE, which might be hard for teachers to adjust to.
  • The employ of PLEs in the classroom can go horribly wrong if teachers fail to prepare students and set usage parameters.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      Or if students do not have the skills to manage their PLEs.
    • kbolinger
       
      I imagine there would need to be some prior (and ongoing) instruction for students in regards to internet safety and online ethics. My 3rd graders, who are probably much less connected with social media sites than older students, have had issues keeping their focus on the task at hand. Having access to online tools is great, but it can also be very distracting for my students. It is just too tempting for them to visit YouTube or another "fun" website rather than focusing on the task at hand. This is definitely a management issue that I have faced in the past couple of years.
  • The Symbaloo interface looks a bit like a high-tech Scrabble board with movable “tiles” on it. These tiles give you access to Web pages or other webmixes.
    • Denise Tatoian
       
      Works great with elementary students. I have seen them in action creating webmixes.
  • The social media platform that supports PLEs creates a perfect space for peer collaboration and sharing information.
    • kkoller
       
      I like this concept of PLE because it allows students to take ownership of their learning. It allows them to go as in depth as they want, and students are able to collaborate on their learning. I see this type of environment being very successful in an upper elementary to high school level classrooms. I worry, however, about lower elementary. I feel as educators we should take those early years to teach the skills needed to prepare students for this type of learning environment. Also to make it clear that learning can happen without technology. Technology is great tool for students to use and a great motivator, but I worry about the hands on experience and building of knowledge through the outside world. 
  • ersonal learning environments are beneficial because they support learning anywhere and allow learners to connect the diverse environments of school, home and play
    • kkoller
       
      Could this open the window of opportunity for students to work with other students in another district on the same concept? Another district in their state, another state, or even country? 
  • The idea of having one site to log into daily and then a pre-constructed  dashboard of all the learning tools and spaces available to us seemed appealing to the 7th period students today.
    • kkoller
       
      I love this concept because it allows the teachers to give the students a starting point, but plenty of opportunity to organize it and add to it. Students could use this for projects to organize their findings. They wouldn't have to sit there and search through their history. I like the fact that students can access it from any computer. 
    • bkoller86
       
      I could definitely see students using this as a way to visually organize their sources them find on a project. 
  • While it’s easy to create webmixes, you also might want to explore the Symbaloo gallery to find webmixes the Symbaloo community has create
    • kkoller
       
      Symbaloo would be great for students. But how about teachers??? Couldn't we all use this to organize all those sites, blogs, etc. we use on a daily basis? Also couldn't we use this to connect to other teachers who are also trying to adapt their classrooms to this new way of learning? 
  • Students now have access to desktop computers, smartphones, tablets, smart TVs and game systems that connect them to free online tools that are always available
    • kbolinger
       
      It is important to remember that, while many schools are working in a 1:1 environment, there are still many other schools that have limited access to technology. I would imagine that personalized learning would be much less challenging when there is ample access to technology, as well as professional development for teachers.
  • PLEs place a large amount of responsibility on students and thus requires a high level of self-management and awareness.
    • bkoller86
       
      I wonder how you handle classes with a large range of student responsibility and awareness in regards of use of PLEs. I would think it would take a large amount of student training. 
Joanne Cram

Article(s): Self- and Peer-Assessment Online - 1 views

  • increase student responsibility and autonomy • strive for a more advanced and deeper understanding of the subject matter, skills and processes • lift the role and status of the student from passive learner to active leaner and assessor
    • Bev Berns
       
      So many times teachers spend too many hours planning a process for students to read a learning target. Each student may choose a varied route to achieve a target, it is up to the teacher to facilitate and support the learning toward that goal.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      I'm assuming you meant "reach" a learning target, but if you didn't, I'm chuckling in agreement. I don't think having the class read aloud the target of the day is a great strategy by any means (though one I've observed many times).
  • Students feel ill equipped to undertake the assessment
    • Bev Berns
       
      YES! It takes a significant amount of time to help student understand how to think about their thinking. But, it is time well worth it because student internalize the process an start to add reflective thinking in conversation or as a natural part of their learning.
  • “Put simply, we see self-assessment as feedback for oneself from oneself.”
    • Bev Berns
       
      It is important for me to look for success and opportunities for improvement.
    • jbdecker
       
      What am I doing well and why?  What could I improve on and can I make a plan to get there?
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  • Students in this sample reported that their attitudes toward self-assessment became more positive as their experiences with the process accumulated.
    • Bev Berns
       
      That isn't surprising. Its new and could feel threatening.
    • joycevermeer
       
      I wonder if when initially doing self-assessment if some students would almost feel guilty about assessing themselves too positively....even if they feel they did a really fantastic job. That's where rubrics come in, right?
    • Diane Jackson
       
      I think that's why self-assessment really needs to be explained what it is and how it is going to be used. As students use this more, they will become more confident about assessing their progress.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      My personal opinion: I don't feel this can take place in one class. This is a cultural norm that has to be set up over many years in school.
  • elp students develop that all-important ability of looking objectively at their work and then making changes that improve its quality
    • Bev Berns
       
      This is the life-long skill to develop!
    • joycevermeer
       
      Looking objectively at your own work isn't always easy. Sometimes the more work you put into it the more your think it becomes great and/or the more you struggle with it the more you think it isn't great. Sometimes how objective you are is subjective.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      True. It is hard to separate the quality of the work itself, and the effort you put into the work.
    • Lynn Helmke
       
      These last sentences summarize the article.  Self-assessment does not have to equate with grading.  We need to teach people how to evaluate their own work so that they can make changes for improvement of their work. I feel that at times people are just after the grade.....pleasing the professor....not about learning. 
  • Students individually assess each other's contribution using a predetermined list of criteria.
    • Kathleen Goslinga
       
      It's important to have a "predetermined list of criteria" that has been identified by the teacher. Followed by a practice peer assessment being completed as a group for practice. This will serve as a guide to the student(s) as they begin the peer assessment process for each other.
  • • Focuses on the development of student’s judgment skills.
    • Kathleen Goslinga
       
      Developing good judgement skills of a student takes practice and time. Small group work of 4-5 members on a couple of sample assignments will help in learning how to identify and offer good peer assessment.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      The idea of using some sample assignments as a way to help identify good peer assessment is a good recommendation. I don't think students are naturally good assessers, and this requires practice (and scaffolding).
  • 2) When assignments are low stakes
    • Kathleen Goslinga
       
      I can see peer grading being low stakes in the beginning. However, as students start to become more proficient in their skills the teacher might consider giving them the opportunity to work on a high stakes assignment as well.
  • When they self-assessed, these students reported that they checked their work, revised it, and reflected on it more generally. Before this class their self-assessment efforts were “relatively mindless.”
    • Kathleen Goslinga
       
      Interesting how the students see the value of the self assessment and prior to this class didn't put as much thought into their work.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      I agree, I find when I include self-assessment regularly my students are more thoughtful about what they produce.  It is also helpful for me because self-assessment allows students to verbalize their processes.  
  • Forcing’ the individual student to assess their own behaviour, as opposed to others is more constructive – it supports the aim of developing collaboration skills, along with the knowledge component.
    • Kathleen Goslinga
       
      I agree that if a student knows how to effectively complete a self evaluation of their work then chances are they will be able to work more collaboratively in a group situation.
    • Deb Vail
       
      I think I agree here. I have found that for the most part students are usually honest in a self-reflection, especially if they have to provide specific evidence to support their claims rather than just a number. If the self-evaluation is just a number it is often inflated. 
  • Goal setting Guided practice with assessment tools Portfolios
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      Key elements of self-assessment to keep in mind.  
  • t is helpful to introduce students to the concepts and elements of assessment against specified criteria in the first weeks of class when you explain the unit of study outline
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      This sets the tone for the class and helps to avoid some of the disadvantages discussed above.  
    • Lynn Helmke
       
      I think that the steps given in this paragraph are crucial for this process to work.  It is teaching what is expected and guidance how to measure.
  • Rees admitted the guidelines were clearly outlined as to how to grade, and that the grades he received were accurate, yet it was the quality of comments that he felt was lacking,
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      I have a lot of questions about his process.  Did he provide students with a rubric for grading? Were comments expected?  Maybe students didn't know what to comment on (organization, subject, editing, etc.)  There are a lot of variations that need to be considered.  Also, is this expectation set out at the beginning of the course?  
    • Evan Abbey
       
      These are valid questions. The context could paint an entirely different picture. Hypothetically, though, I can see situations where he would be correct. Commenting can often be lacking, regardless of the strength of the guidelines, given a student's perceptions around how they should critique fellow students.
  • When learners are mature, self-directed and motivated.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      Depending on the type of class, peer feedback might not be an expectation of some learners.  For example, in an art course peer feedback is critical, but I wouldn't necessarily want (or expect to give) peer feedback in other courses I have taken.  
    • Evan Abbey
       
      This is very true. Not only subject areas, but different contexts as well. It is harder to be critical when you are simply a classmate; much easier when you are a teammate on a Mock Trial team or a Basketball team, for example.
  • we have a scoring table which where I will evaluate my 3 other group members, and myself
    • scampie1
       
      I guess I would like to know if group members are not alble to resolve problems during the project before it ends. I like the idea of monitoring group chats or discussions and using wikis that allows for some awareness of how groups are working.
  • • Students are involved in the process and are encouraged to take part ownership of this
    • scampie1
       
      If students are involved in determining what they want feedback on and have the opportunity to share what they felt went well, it is more likely feedback from peers will be valued. I have used LASW protocols, for example, and teachers seem to do more collaborative feedback this way. See link: http://www.lasw.org/protocols.html
  • Goal setting is essential because students can evaluate their progress more clearly when they have targets against which to measure their performance.
    • scampie1
       
      This is a great way to motivate students in a topic. If they can set a goal and you can support them or show how what they are learning will help them meet that goal, students gain in their learning. A bit difficult to do with younger students
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Being able to measure their performance is key. Simply going from a B to an A is a nice goal, but students often don't know how to get there. I had the goal of getting an A in my Renaissance Literature course, and was willing to do whatever it would take to get it, but for the life of me, I couldn't figure out what it would take. The grades were not connected with measurable performance.
    • Joanne Cram
       
      I think that while having goals visible to students to help drive achievement, it is also very effective when those goals are put into measurable conditions that can be graphed and monitored visually. This can be highly motivating.
    • scampie1
       
      When students identify what they did well and what they need to improve, you are provided with information about their understanding of the concepts and criteria.
    • joycevermeer
       
      Yes, the student learns about what the student knows and the teacher learns about what the student knows. It's a win-win situation.
    • scampie1
       
      Specific, measureable, aligned, realistic and timely are parts of a SMART goal if I remember correctly.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      There is some discrepancy. I learned them as Specific, Measureable, Achieveable, Relevent, and Time-Bound. Though I've seen them different in different places.
  • Grading is based on a predetermined process,
    • bgeanaea11
       
      This is important to note- if makes the process clear and meaningful.
  • • Students will have a tendency to award everyone the same mark.
    • bgeanaea11
       
      I feel a clear process and expectations would help with this.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      It can. Though, the term "clear" is not very clear. I've seen peer assessment tasks that are very detailed, but it doesn't mean students can actually provide good assessment. Many see this as something that will potentially make them look bad if they are overly critical... it seems to go against the proverbial Sunday School Lesson of being nice to everyone.
  • This also highlights the need to fully prepare and equip students for their own assessment and for the assessment of others.
    • bgeanaea11
       
      Absolutely!
  • • Agreed marking criteria means there can be little confusion about assignment outcomes and expectations.
    • bgeanaea11
       
      This is key!
  • • Additional briefing time can increase a lecturer’s workload
    • bgeanaea11
       
      As long as it is valuable to the learners I think it should be worth the time;)
  • “The difference between self-assessment and giving the teacher what he or she wants was a recurring theme
    • bgeanaea11
       
      Interesting!
    • joycevermeer
       
      It would be difficult, when you are so used to teachers evaluating your work, to truly assess your own work without thinking about what the teacher might want.
  • They also recommend that teachers share expectations for assignments and define quality.
    • joycevermeer
       
      That teachers share their expectations really makes it self-assessment, not self-grading.
  • There are ways of framing and then using self-assessment
    • ajbeyer
       
      I think this is a good skill not only for the current time and place, but also a skill students can use throughout their life. If they can learn how to effectively and objectively look at their work, they will become better and better at it in all areas of their life.
    • Joanne Cram
       
      I think this is a good case in support of using rubrics- if written correctly, it's a good tool to guide self refelction in a measurable way.
  • The instructor must explain expectations clearly to them before they begin.
    • Travis Wilkins
       
      While this seems obvious and upfront, I can recall some experiences in my undergraduate work where we were expected to complete a peer assessment and this was not at all clear.  It left our conversations to be very dull and not meaningful.  We focused on very superficial things and tried not to say things that would hurt the other's feelings.  If the expectations had been clear it would have made the process much more meaningful.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      I think the word "clear" isn't clear. That may be a bit glib, but it is a throwaway statement to say "Your expectations should be clear". Well, no doubt. But how do you know they are clear? Clear to whom? Luckily, the author backs this up with some other paragraphs below... usually authors leave it at that.
  • Portfolios
    • Travis Wilkins
       
      I see more and more reference to portfolios as students and schools move toward a 1:1 computing environment.  However, often I find that the purpose has not been clearly articulated, and the portfolio essentially becomes a collection of student work similar to the scrapbook that my mother made of my school work while growing up.  Placing the focus of the portfolio on either a self assessment of the process or product helps to provide a context and purpose for the practice.
  • • Encourages students to reflect on their role and contribution to the process of the group work
    • Travis Wilkins
       
      I feel that self assessment done well can be extremely valuable for our students.  It focuses the the process of self reflection and forces the student to constantly look back at the criteria listed for the work to be completed.
  • “Professors in the trenches tend to hold their monopoly on evaluating their students’ work dearly, since it helps them control the classroom better by reinforcing their power and expertise,” supports a cognitive and instructor-focused learning orientation.
    • Travis Wilkins
       
      Unfortunately, this statement rings very true in my personal experience.  The focus of the professors often seems to be to protect their standing as the expert and power holder.  I often wonder if the constructivist centered work that is starting to take place in our K-12 institutions is impacting what is happening at the next level.
  • There are many options still to be explored. Time will tell.
    • Travis Wilkins
       
      With the growth of MOOCs as well as other online learning options I see this as an area that will certainly continue to change and grow over time.  While both peer and self assessment may offer specific challenges in the online course world, I do believe they can have a place in assessment.
  • critically review their own work with an eye for improvement.
    • Travis Wilkins
       
      I think this is a crucial point in the process of self-assessment.  the purpose must be viewed as a process for improvement.  If the objective is complete upon grading, the self - assessment will be of little value.
    • Diane Jackson
       
      I agree that this is a crucial point. It is about the process for improvement. I take classes now for the knowledge not the grade. It puts a whole new spin on the learning and wanting to improvement my practices, etc.
  • identifying any ‘slackers’ or those who sit on the side lines through the entire project, with minimal contributions.
    • Deb Vail
       
      This is so true. I hate to admit it, but I think I was too focused on making sure that the assessment took into account each member's contribution more so than did each student meet the target or goal. I wonder if it's because I was always one of the heavy lifters in all projects. I wanted to be sure that my grade didn't suffer because of those that didn't care. I suspect my approach to assessing group work was influenced unduly by my past experiences as a student than sound pedagogy.  
    • Lynn Helmke
       
      Question: Couldn't the teacher "see" who has participated in the group work by using the instructor's tools for the online platform?  Why use peer assessment for a grade?
    • jbdecker
       
      I see the reasoning behind this peer assessment but I never liked it as a student and I have had a hard time even giving part of a grade on group projects based on peer evaluations so I have generally steered clear of using them in this way.
  • I have mixed feelings about peer evaluations, leaning towards not using peer reviews as part of the assessment strategy. I wonder if the concept of peer evaluation is exclusive to higher education institutions in the USA? In considering the 
    • Deb Vail
       
      I agree. I have never been satisfied with efforts at peer assessment. I love the idea of it, but I never got the desired results. I suspect I did not do enough modeling. 
  • Though, my experience is that the points do not motivate the student to participate in the project on the front end, but more allows the other group members to express his or her dissatisfaction with the other group members lack of participation or cooperation. I do 
    • Deb Vail
       
      I have to agree here. This has more of a punitive feel to it rather than providing an incentive for positive behavior. 
  • A well written rubric not only helps the facilitator score the assignment but it and can greatly increase the quality and effort put into assignments by giving students a clear expectations with knowledge that must be demonstrated.
    • Deb Vail
       
      A well-written rubric provides guidance for what the end result should be, but it doesn't do much to ensure that the group works well together to accomplish this goal. Often, it just indicates what the heavy lifters have to do.
    • joycevermeer
       
      More than anything else I have learned this through this course...that well-written rubrics are so important! I thought that before, but now as we look at self and peer assessment I see it as absolutely critical.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Deb, you really have a good point. Rubrics for group work in of themselves do not ensure that everyone is doing their part.
  • • Students feel ill equipped to undertake the assessment. Preparing students for self or peer assessment
    • Deb Vail
       
      I have found that the more students practice assessing other pieces of writing, the better informed they are as to the what quality work looks like. They are better able to assess it in others' work as well as their own. However, often there doesn't seem to be enough time to devote to this process. It is so worthwhile but very time consuming. 
    • Diane Jackson
       
      I agree with you Deb. It is so worthwhile but it takes time. In order to get better they need practice and guidance. I do think student engagement and responsibility for own learning will outweigh the time involvement in the long run.
  • hange to one of facilitator.
  • the ultimate expression of individualism
    • joycevermeer
       
      n education we are always talking about the individual...doing individual child planning...working individually with students....valuing the thoughts of the individual...etc. This is a good point. Peer evaluation is the ultimate expression of individualism.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      I'm not sure I understood what the author was trying to get at with this section. Whether peer evaluation is considered "individual" or "collective" is beside the point to me.
  • “Most group work is assessed by giving every individual the same grade for a team effort. However this approach runs counter to the principles of individual accountability in group learning…. difficult to determine the individual grades for work submitted by the group.”
    • joycevermeer
       
      This is true as well. Maybe peer assessment isn't so individualistic. How can an instructor possibly know exactly how much an individual contributed to the group work. There are ways of making it look like you're a team player, when maybe you aren't....moreso with online learning I would think.
  • a team grade AND a grade allocated for the peer evaluation, the latter usually accounting for a small percentage of the total assignment.
    • joycevermeer
       
      This seems right to me.
  • the ability to self-assess skills and completed work is important.
    • Diane Jackson
       
      This is an important part of career readiness, being able to self-assess. In my work career I am constantly reflecting on my own work, what I need to know more about and how I can improve the process and/or the final product.
  • Encourages student involvement and responsibility.
    • Diane Jackson
       
      If we want students to be engaged and responsible for their learning, self-assessment is a great start. Students monitor their progress and contribute to their learning goals.
  • As this work illustrates, self-assessment need not necessarily be about self-grading. There are ways of framing and then using self-assessment that can help students develop that all-important ability of looking objectively at their work and then making changes that improve its quality.
    • Lynn Helmke
       
      These last sentences summarize the article.  Self-assessment does not have to equate with grading.  We need to teach people how to evaluate their own work so that they can make changes to improve their work. I feel that at times people are just after the grade.....pleasing the professor....not about learning. 
  • Rather than assessing whether the student learned from the assignment or not, this method seems geared to identifying any ‘slackers’ or those who sit on the side lines through the entire project, with minimal contributions.
    • Lynn Helmke
       
      Question: Couldn't the teacher "see" who has participated in the group work by using the instructor's tools for the online platform or asking for entrance into the google doc process?
  • ‘Forcing’ the individual student to assess their own behaviour, as opposed to others is more constructive – it supports the aim of developing collaboration skills, along with the knowledge component
    • Lynn Helmke
       
      Personally, I like self-evaluation better than peer- assessment.  With peer-assessment, other participants may not know why a peer has not contributed at all or minimally to a group project. Maybe there was a good reason.  Also, I still don't like a group grade. What I have seen is that a few people carry the load of the work.
  • Yet there are times when it won’t work, this is where I agree with Professor Rees, the situations where students do need detailed and constructive feedback from an instructor, or mentor that is qualified.
    • Lynn Helmke
       
      I agree with this statement.  When I am paying for a graduate course, I want feedback from the person who knows more than I know about the subject. Peer review is fine, too, but the instructor needs to step in when information/insight needs to be added to the discussion.
  • t is helpful to introduce students to the concepts and elements of assessment against specified criteria in the first weeks of class when you explain the unit of study outline. This requires taking time at the outset of the group activity or unit of study to discuss what is required, and to provide guidance on how to judge their own and others’ contributions. Students will need to be assisted to develop criteria that match the learning outcomes with regards to the output and process of the group work. If assessment criteria for each element are set up and clearly communicated, your role will also change to one of facilitator.
    • ajbeyer
       
      This is exactly what needs to happen in order for assessment to be outlined explicitly in a class. It's crucial to teach these steps to students in order for the assessmets (both peer and self) are done well.
  • It is helpful to introduce students to the concepts and elements of assessment against specified criteria in the first weeks of class when you explain the unit of study outline. This requires taking time at the outset of the group activity or unit of study to discuss what is required, and to provide guidance on how to judge their own and others’ contributions. Students will need to be assisted to develop criteria that match the learning outcomes with regards to the output and process of the group work. If assessment criteria for each element are set up and clearly communicated, your role will also change to one of facilitator.
    • Lynn Helmke
       
      I think that the steps given in this paragraph are crucial for this process to work.  It is teaching what is expected and guidance how to measure.
  • Students that fell into this group were physically and cognitively lazy, not contributing to the process as required. This phenomenon was referenced in several other research studies within the paper. I suggest another group be added to the mix besides the loafers— students that cannot provide feedback due to the lack of necessary skills, whether it be education background or language.
    • jbdecker
       
      I can see where this could be a major problem in a large open course with peer grading in anonymity.  I don't see the social loafing problem to be one that I would deal with in a online class with 20-30 students using a LMS like Moodle or Canvas where expectations have been set up, models have been provided and scaffolding of skills has been completed prior to a peer evaluation.
  • When learners are at a similar skill level
    • jbdecker
       
      I can see where this could be an issue that an instructor would have to use scaffolding to overcome prior to having the students complete peer grading. 
  • It can also be very effective in small, closed online classes where students are at similar skill level and receive instruction and guidance in how to grade within the process.
    • jbdecker
       
      I guess I should have read this part before I commented above.  I am thinking about this article from my perspective as a High School teacher.  I would never expect to use peer grading without first providing instruction and assessing student readiness to handle the process.
  • It seems like the kind of skill that should be addressed in college.
    • jbdecker
       
      Couldn't it start much sooner than this?  If it is a skill that is acquired with practice and developed with feedback why wait until college? Being able to look at criteria and critically assess your own performance could and should happen much earlier than college.
  • They were required to submit their self-assessments with the completed work, but their assessments were not graded.
    • jbdecker
       
      Requiring students to self-assess and submit it with their work makes so much sense. We work on creating rubrics so that the students know the criteria that they are trying to meet with their performance why wouldn't you require the students to self assess against this same rubric. To be honest though this is something that I have rarely done.  I have reminded students to reference the rubric provided but I haven't let them know early on that they would be required to submit a self-assessment using the rubric.  This is something that I am eager to try with my students in the near future. 
  • that is well crafted to include focused self reflection questions)
    • jbdecker
       
      I like this idea. Have each student provide evidence for the work they have completed in their group.  Providing this self evaluation at the front end of a group project may spur more participation if each student knows they will be responsible for providing answers to these questions to the instructor.
  • Students can also benefit from using rubrics or checklists to guide their assessments
    • criley55
       
      Highly important when having students evaluate themselves or others!
    • Joanne Cram
       
      This also helps students know what is expected of them.
  • For peer evaluation to work effectively, the learning environment in the classroom must be supportive. Students must feel comfortable and trust one another in order to provide honest and constructive
    • criley55
       
      I completely agree with this - if it is not an environment of mutual respect, you can't expect that they will give each other honest open feedback. Students will be guarded and not open to others opinions.
  • For example, a student may agree to work toward the grade of "B" by completing a specific number of assignments at a level of quality described by the instructor.
    • criley55
       
      I remember doing these in school and while it is a way for students to consider setting goals, it makes me wonder if it's the best idea because shouldn't all students be aiming for an A?
  • Students do not learn to monitor or assess their learning on their own; they need to be taught strategies for self monitoring and self assessment
    • criley55
       
      Some students come by this naturally but most need very specific examples and guided practice. There are many students who have never "failed" at anything so wouldn't be able to accurately assess themselves.
    • Joanne Cram
       
      In working with the special education population of teachers and students, this is a key point. If we don't explicitly teach the objectives we hope to achieve, there's a strong correlation for failure.
  • Portfolios are purposeful, organized, systematic collections of student work that tell the story of a student's efforts, progress, and achievement in specific areas
    • criley55
       
      I like the use of portfolios if they are truly a story of the students' work showing growth over time and not just items selected by the teacher to showcase what they think parents want to see.
  • Instructors who use group work and peer assessment frequently can help students develop trust by forming them into small groups early in the semester and having them work in the same groups throughout the term.
    • Nicole Wood
       
      I definitely feel that peer assessment can be powerful, but only if students are taught the process and given opportunities to practice with teacher guidance. Student comfort level and trust in their group are also key. I think it takes the teacher carefully considering personalities and ability-level while also supporting teams to establish these groups. I also like the idea of students staying with the same team all year to help establish this comfort level. I would be interested to see different models of what peer assessment looks like in primary grades.
  • In addition, students' motivation to learn increases when they have self-defined, and therefore relevant, learning goals.
    • Nicole Wood
       
      I do believe that goal setting is motivational for students. I found even in the primary grades students took more ownership in their learning when they set their own goals. They often needed support with forming SMART goals, but the idea came from them and they felt confident talking about their goal.
  • students are looking at their work and judging the degree to which it reflects the goals of the assignment and the assessment criteria the teacher will be using to evaluate the work
    • Nicole Wood
       
      I found students frequently put more effort into their work when they knew they would be self-assessing. By providing them with the rubric or criteria that I would be evaluating their work with and having them complete it first, they were much more focused on the quality of their work. In the primary grades, it could be as simple as a check list with pictures to prompt them for what to look for in their work. It also opened the door for discussions on their work because I could ask them how they came up with their marks.
    • ajbeyer
       
      I think that a lot of times, students can be harder graders on themselves than a teacher is on them. They have gone through the ups and downs of the assingment and know where they weak points are. The hardest critic is always yourself.
  • The instructor usually takes the average of the peer evaluations, and shares this grade with each team member which serves as the student’s grade in the peer evaluation portion.
    • Nicole Wood
       
      I was initially very hesitant over the idea of peer evaluation, but did like the idea of the evaluations being averaged and anonymous. I still feel as though instructors could get a good idea of the participation level for different members through the use of some online tools.
  • The tool also encourages the student to consider actions that he or she demonstrated to support the team and to estimate what percentage of the work he or she contributed to the project.
    • Nicole Wood
       
      I really like the idea of self-evaluation, especially for adult courses. I often feel that adults typically are truthful about their level of contribution. If the evaluation form or reflection is phrased well, it can also lead the adults to be more honest about what they actually contributed to the group project. Self reflecting also can help them change their future behavior within group projects.
  • Portfolio assessment emphasizes evaluation of students' progress, processes, and performance over time
    • ajbeyer
       
      Portfolio assessment is a great way for students to gain a better understanding of what they have learned and their progress over time. It's better than a 1 time snapshot test assessment. It's a great way for students to see that progress has been made.
    • Joanne Cram
       
      A portfolio is only as effective as the instructor makes it. If it is just a means of " turning something in"- then it will not be valued, utilized, nor looked at by the student. If a portfolio is used as a basis for comparison of learning and progress made, it can be highly effective.
  • Showing students examples of effective and ineffective pieces of work can help to make those definitions real and relevant
    • ajbeyer
       
      I know that I benefit from seeing what is effective and what is not effective, so I am sure students are the same way. It helps me realize to what level I need to work and what is expected of me. Showing students good and not good examples can also help them review their orwn work better too.
  • Group work can be more successful when students are involved in developing the assessment process.
    • ajbeyer
       
      When students are involved in their grading process they feel like they have a stake in it. When they feel like they have a part of it, they feel like they need to achieve higher in order to meet the stakes they have helped set. They can be very good, but not used all the time.
  •  
    " increase student responsibility and autonomy * strive for a more advanced and deeper understanding of the subject matter, skills and processes * lift the role and status of the student from passive learner to active leaner and assessor"
  •  
    " increase student responsibility and autonomy * strive for a more advanced and deeper understanding of the subject matter, skills and processes * lift the role and status of the student from passive learner to active leaner and assessor"
tvalline

Articles: Presentation "Awakening" - 5 views

    • medidiigo
       
      And all this time I thought it was just my own inability to stay focused...No wonder we begin to "zone out" when someone reads their slides to us.
  • PowerPoint is a medium
    • medidiigo
       
      a very valid point. It is, afterall, only a tool. It is how we choose to use the tool that really matters. A challenging and freeing thought.
    • nathanjenkins
       
      Yes.  I could have benefited from a quick course a long time ago.  I believe sometimes we are too caught up in learning the tool and lose the meaning behind it.
  • it is more difficult to process information if it is coming at you both verbally and in written form at the same time.
    • medidiigo
       
      No wonder I have felt frustrated when a presenter is reading his bullet points to the group. This explains our tendency to mentally "check out" after about the third slide full of text.
    • nathanjenkins
       
      I am guilty of this presenter fault.  No wonder my students seemed to check out.  Even after I gave them a sheet to follow along and take notes.  It would have been much better if I didn't say anything at all and just let them read and write the information.
  • ...26 more annotations...
  • Talking about pollution in Houston? Instead of giving me four bullet points of EPA data, why not read me the stats but show me a photo of a bunch of dead birds, some smog and even a diseased lung? This is cheating! It’s unfair! It works.
  • Talking about pollution in Houston? Instead of giving me four bullet points of EPA data, why not read me the stats but show me a photo of a bunch of dead birds, some smog and even a diseased lung? This is cheating! It’s unfair! It works
    • medidiigo
       
      A picture is worth a thousand words. It's time we tap into the power of the emotional connection in our presentations. Students and colleagues will remember major points because they are connected to an emotionally charged visual image.
  • Once a younger worker hears the story of what happened to the poor guy who didn’t wear his hardhat on the factory floor, he never forgets the lesson (and he never forgets to wear his hardhat). Stories get our attention and are easier to remember than lists of rules
    • medidiigo
       
      I love this example. It does a good job of emphasizing the importance of using stories. The story in this example was much more effective than a memo because it struck a chord with the listener who was able to visualize the consequences of not heeding the warning.
    • nathanjenkins
       
      I really enjoy the push for storytelling in this article.  I find the lack of storytelling in our school system one of the great demises.  Everyone craves a good story, everyone needs a good story.  Many cultures thrive on storytelling as one of their main forms of education.
  • If everything is important, then nothing is important. If everything is a priority, then nothing is a priority.
  • “Curse of Knowledge.” The Curse of Knowledge is essentially the condition whereby the deliverer of the message cannot imagine what it’s like not to possess his level of background knowledge on the topic. When he speaks in abstractions to the audience, it makes perfect sense to him but him alone. In his mind, it seems simple and obvious. The six principles—SUCCESs—are your weapons, then, to fight your own Curse of Knowledge (we all have it).
    • medidiigo
       
      So they are saying that we assume that our audience understands background knowledge at the same level that we do. Isn't it true that we don't want to bore people with information that they already know? Seems like a fine line...
  • it is more effective to target both the visual and auditory processors of working memory
  • One of the components for creating sticking messages is story
    • merle64
       
      Absolutely true!  Our whole lives are a series of stories, with universal truths and we not only reveal ourselves through sharing our stories, we help others feel understood, too.  Wrap a difficult, abstract concept in a story, and you've just created a connecting experience for the audience.  It takes discernment, however, to recognize the stories that communicate our message the very best.
    • tvalline
       
      In addition, we need to make sure these stories are relevant and concise as possible so we don't lose our audience in the details.
  • Research shows that visuals (animation) plus concise, simultaneous narration is better than just narration alone.
    • merle64
       
      A master at this is author and speaker Patrick Lencioni.  His presentations are filled with creative visuals and funny, informative, research-based content that make a person think in new ways.
  • Communication is about getting others to adopt your point of view, to help them understand why you’re excited (or sad, or optimistic or whatever else you are.)If all you want to do is create a file of facts and figures, then cancel the meeting and send in a report.
    • merle64
       
      I love this!  It is both a gift and an art to be able to successfully help people understand "why you're excited, sad, etc."  And it can't be manufactured--it has to be at least somewhat organic in that the presenter truly has to believe in what he/she is communicating, and see purpose driving it. The audience can perceive inauthenticity quickly.
  • If you believe in your idea, sell it. Make your point as hard as you can and get what you came for. Your audience will thank you for it, because deep down, we all want to be sold.
    • merle64
       
      I would add that some people, depending on their personality, "buy in" easier than others.  Some are intrinsically skeptical at first--and it's a slower process to form a connection with the speaker. Our history also has something to do with this.  If we're used to long-winded, uninteresting speakers, we may form a initial resistance against any presenter.  That makes the presenter's job an even more complex (but fascinating!) challenge.  
  • No more than six words on a slide. EVER. There is no presentation so complex that this rule needs to be broken.
    • merle64
       
      This is a challenge!  When I'm working with elementary students on writing lessons, I've used real rough drafts of some of my picture book manuscripts to show the evolution from rough draft to finished picture book.  Lots of text, with me reading. If I'm most honest, it's also the time in the presentation when I feel like I'm losing their attention.  I amp up my theatrics, but that's not enough.  There has to be a better way to show visually  how making changes to a rough draft can dramatically improve the text.  
  • Communication is about getting others to adopt your point of view, to help them understand why you’re excited (or sad, or optimistic or whatever else you are.)If all you want to do is create a file of facts and figures, then cancel the meeting and send in a report.
  • Cognitive load theory
    • Joe Brekke
       
      I'm excited to learn more about this. 
  • Most of us know intuitively (or through experience) that presenting to an audience with text-filled slides does not work, but others — your boss perhaps — may need more convincing.
    • Joe Brekke
       
      With the abundance of district-led presentations we must suffer through each year, it seems that this class should be part of every administrative credential program.
  • Communication is the transfer of emotion.
    • Joe Brekke
       
      This is crucial. I've rarely been moved by an all-staff presentation. A few times, at national conferences with polished speakers, I've had moments of emotional connection. But it is too rare. 
    • marydirksen
       
      First things first. Create emotion to engage the brain.
    • tvalline
       
      Exactly.  Emotion creates connection and this promotes retention.
  • Our brains have two sides. The right side is emotional, musical and moody. The left side is focused on dexterity, facts and hard data.
    • Joe Brekke
       
      Last year, in the course "Examing: Teaching with the Brain in Mind," we learned this was not true. We were told the brain is not divided into hemispheres as previously thought. The entire brain is working together at the same time. It was a great class, and it is having a profound impact on my teaching (and learning!). 
  • Bullets Are For the NRA
    • Joe Brekke
       
      I love this!
  • “Our mission is to become the international leader in the space industry through maximum team-centered innovation and strategically targeted aerospace initiatives.” Or “...put a man on the moon and return him safely by the end of the decade.”
  • Surprise people.
    • Joe Brekke
       
      This is so risky! I love people who take risks!
  • First, make yourself cue cards.
    • marydirksen
       
      This is where I need to start creating power points for my audience and NOT just so that I can keep track of my content
  • Second, make slides that reinforce your words, not repeat them
    • marydirksen
       
      Obvious , but true.
  • its essential meaning
    • marydirksen
       
      We all want this. Get to the point!
  • real things
    • marydirksen
       
      That's how we learn, by introducing new ideas with context.
  • No dissolves, spins or other transitions.
    • tvalline
       
      Good to know.  I always thought this helped keep the interest of my audience.  I guess the interest would be on the transition and not on what I'm trying to get them to learn.
  • It is not enough to take people through a laundry list of talking points and information on your slides; you must make them feel something.
    • tvalline
       
      This gets to the root of making information stick.  We must appeal to emotion.  
  • people can not read and listen well at the same time
    • tvalline
       
      This is a key point I think presenters, including myself, often forget.
Mary Overholtzer

ollie1: Iowa Online Teaching Standards - 0 views

    • Monte DeArmoun
       
      This is where online testing will be a benefit. Students could have immediate feedback on their learning process. Teachers will NEED to create a variety of assessments to keep students interested so they are not bored from taking the same type of test.
    • Deon Wingert
       
      I agree 100% Monte! Students DO want feedback immediately, and I truly believe this would provide for IMMEDIATE feedback, if used effectively.
    • Tim Hadley
       
      Plus.... no papers to carry home!
  • Has experienced online learning from the perspective of a student
    • Monte DeArmoun
       
      If teachers haven't tried the software how can they instruct the students or answer the students' questions? I am enjoying this class!
    • Bob Pauk
       
      This is the fourth online class I have taken and have definately experience online learning. Most has been very good and very easy to follow, but some has been very confusing. I do use aspects with my current classes such as blogging.
    • crjessen44
       
      I feel this is critical. As a teacher, I believe all teachers need to live this experience first hand, in the role of a student. Being a student in an on-line evironment will help me to be a better on-line faciliator. I will be more sympathetic to the stuggles of being on-line learner and hopefully I will be more effective, learning from my experience as a student.
    • david moeller
       
      Yes, going through the process helps us better understand how to use it. And provides us with both resources and examples.
    • anonymous
       
      I am enjoying this class very much. I also believe that we as educators must experience things ourselves so that we can better help our students and understand the struggles that they might encounter.
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      I definitely concur. It is vital to know the problems frequently encountered and how to trouble shoot them from experience.
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      We gain student trust not only when we can help them solve technological challenges but when we can empathize with them as well.
    • mhauser
       
      This class is a great experience, but sometimes I've wondered if Evan has purposely built some obstacles into the course so that we could experience the kinds of problems that our kids might experience and have that empathy going in. For example, last Sunday night I tried to finish up the first week's work, but couldn't get in to the program. While I found out later that the server was quirky, I didn't know that at the time. I just knew that my work was going to be late, and the kid in me said, "I'm in trouble!" That was a very good experience.
    • Jessica White
       
      Think of all the years that we have spent as students in the "traditional" classroom setting. We have watched teachers and seen so much modeling. Those experiences are still with us as we teach today. Online learning is a new avenue, but we still need to see the modeling from our teachers. It will help us be more successful as teachers.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I have been in trouble with lates since day one....This online experience is NOT anything like I have experienced in the past. The tools out there are phenomenal...and overwhelming.
  • 5. Creates and implements a variety of assessments that meet course learning goals and provide data to improve student progress and course instruction (ITS 5)
    • Monte DeArmoun
       
      This is where online testing will be a benefit. Students could have immediate feedback on their learning process. Teachers will NEED to create a variety of assessments to keep students interested so they are not bored from taking the same type of test.
    • Bob Pauk
       
      I have clickers in my room which does allow for immediate feedback. It can be very useful, but have had pretty significant software problems with the clickers so far.
    • Monte DeArmoun
       
      Is there a particular brand/kind that you use?
    • Tresa Zaragoza
       
      I have clickers, but I am a little weak on using them.
  • ...50 more annotations...
  • 1. Demonstrates ability to enhance academic performance and support for the agency's student achievement goals (ITS 1)
    • Mary Trent
       
      It is difficult to develop assessment tools that show this kind of learning growth with technology without it being more of a lab setting with a control group. I haven't found anything real practical yet that is reliable.
  • Tailors instruction to meet the different needs of students, including different learning styles, different interests and backgrounds, and students with special needs or whom are language learners (SREB C.7, Varvel V.H, ITS 4.c)
    • Mary Trent
       
      I think that classroom teachers are still struggling with this. We are improving our teaching styles to meet the needs and different learning styles of students, but we aren't quite there yet. My son, for example, is an auditory learner. I'd like for him to be able to have tests read to him without filling out a 504 or IEP. It should just be something that every classroom is quipped to do and the teacher is willing to do it.
    • Bob Pauk
       
      This is always a challenge. We have done training on this for years.
    • crjessen44
       
      This one grabbed my attention. I'm currently helping two students with special learning needs take an on-line math class for credit recovery. It has been a very frustrating experience for them in multiple capacities. They not only struggle with content, but with technology issues - the two combined are sometimes more than the students can handle. On a positive note, I've seen some really cool things you can do within an on-line class to tailor the instruction to better meet their needs. I think in some respects you could perhaps more easily tailor on-line learning to meet the needs of a more diverse set of learners?
    • Ashley Weaver
       
      I think these online learning tools, if used properly, can help all students, but especially thoses with special needs (including TAG, ELL, etc.). I think the ability to move at their own pace would help some greatly!
    • rcordes1961
       
      Ashely took my comments! She is dead on though. Online learning tools can be an amazing assest to students with special needs, if used appropriately. In Mary's example, podcasting or some other type of online audio program could be used to assist auditory learners.
    • Cassie Gruman
       
      I am a huge fan of Howard Gardner's multiple intelligence model. As I have been searching through the "Cool Tools for School" website, I am constantly thinking of ways I could apply these newly discovered tools to my curriculum to reach all of the eight intelligences to some degree. I really think it will be vital to offer more options in an on-line course, since the face-to-face interaction will be less, perhaps making it more difficult to get to know students and their unique personalities.
    • Bob Pauk
       
      I think one way to address this is to do a hybrid course with some online aspects and other face to face. I think anytime we can have variety in our assignments, presentations and assessments, we are more likely to reach a greater number of students with at least some part of our class.
    • Shirley Horstman
       
      I like the hybrid concept. Our students are diverse in the way they learn and this allows each student to maximize and individual their learning.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      Again, moderation in all things is key for learning and building relationships.
  • • Provides and communicates evidence of learning and course data to students and colleagues (SREB J.6, ITS 1.a
    • rcordes1961
       
      Providing feedback to students in any type of course is extremely important in order for students to continue to progress. When not meeting face to face with the instructor communication and course feedback is imperative.
    • Deon Wingert
       
      Rob, I think that feedback, when given constructively to students prior to any type of evaluation, can be one of the most effective teaching tools a teacher can use!
    • Ashley Weaver
       
      I think the use of technology will enhance feedback opportunities. I also think that the peer feedback opportunities could be a very enriching experience for students, in addition to teach feedback.
    • anonymous
       
      I struggle with feedback within my language arts classroom when it comes to writing assignments. By the time I get them all graded and handed back, the kids look at their grade and many recycle them on their way out. Did they really benefit from all the time I spent making comments and giving them feedback?
    • Nancy Peterman
       
      I think that supplementing our face-to-face classrooms with online environments (ex. Moodle) will enrich the student experience and provide the teacher with a quicker response method.
    • rcordes1961
       
      Sherri, I wonder if students would take more time reading feedback if the feedback was on some form of online feedback. I agree many times students are just interested only in the grade as oposed to how to improve or what they can learn from the feedback. I said many times, nothing gets in the way of learning more, than the almighty grade!
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I model feedback after the Boy's town Model. Constructive feedback starts with a powerful statement of praise AND supporting details. We also have a consideration statement...NO buts...for example: I truly appreciate the aesthetic details that your writing creates within my mind due to your word choice and the emotions created. You might consider looking at us more by becomeing more familiar with your writing so that eye contact is given to your audience. I have found that many students appreciate oral feedback and most look forward to it. Naturally, I always end the feedback session after the students go. What's really neat is when students have done such a good job with feedback that it's difficult for me to add more...
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      Once again, it's the relationship piece that is needed within the feedback piece. I believe we need to show students improvement through building the relationship.
  • • Demonstrates growth in technology knowledge and skills in order to stay current with emerging technologies (SREB B.5)
    • Deon Wingert
       
      I am TRYING to stay current with technologies provided by our staff development, and believe it is critical to stay one step ahead of students.
    • anonymous
       
      I also am trying to stay current with new forms of technology. My biggest roadblock though is not knowing what is out there. That's why I was so excited to see the Cool Tools for Schools site. It was a valuable resource that I can browse through to find out what is currently being used technology-wise.
    • Amy Burns
       
      I am constantly hunting for new tools to use. I am sometimes frustrated by sites that lure me in and then, just as I am feeling comfortable using their tools, suddenly want to charge me. Back to searching......
    • rcordes1961
       
      Staying current with new technolgy is vitally important, however, I respectfully disagree with Deon that teaches need to stay ahead of the students, as students can sometimes be the best teachers for adults.
    • mhauser
       
      I agree with rcordes, sorry Deon! We can't keep ahead we have to guide. I took the human relations course 30 years ago, and remember hearing for the first time that teachers would become 'facilitators'. I thought that was a crazy idea back then, but boy, that has to be who we are. It's great when the kids solve a problem before me, for them and for me.
    • Chip Bishop
       
      Staying current on technology is an never ending struggle. You can't keep up with all of it, but by focusing on a few things that work for you can make it less stressful.
    • Victoria Guilliatt
       
      I agree with not knowing what is out there, especially since I am not in the classroom anymore, it is hard to find sites that are easy to navigate.
  • • Understands the differences between teaching online and teaching face-to-face (SREB C.1, Varvel V)
    • Tim Hughes
       
      This could be difficult for an animated personality, where actions speak as loud as words.
    • anonymous
       
      I can definitely see the benefits to teaching online, but it would be a sad foreign language class if all of the material was taught this way. There has to be social, face-to-face interactions. That's where fluency can be built.
    • anonymous
       
      I totally agree. I keep trying to add more technology to my classes all the time, but I really try to caution myself to add it because it is an improvement and not just simply adding technology.
    • Tim Hadley
       
      This standard seems very vague to me. How do you determine if the instructor knows the difference between face to face and online learning? I guess I am still sorting out and determining that myself what the difference is, so may be why it is difficult for me to discern.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      It's the relationship variable.....do we care enough to reach out?
  • • Provides and communicates evidence of learning and course data to students and colleagues (SREB J.6, ITS 1.a)
  • Is knowledgeable and has the ability to use computer programs required in online education to improve learning and teaching, including course management software (CMS) and synchronous/asynchronous communication tools (chat, email, web 2.0, videoconferencing, webinar, whiteboard, etc.) (SREB B.3, Varvel III.B)
    • Bob Pauk
       
      I currently use numreous programs: from powerpoint and gradebook to email, smartboard, blogging, etc. In four weeks I will either be much more technologically advanced or I will be ready to give up.
    • Tim Hughes
       
      I must agree. It is starting to get out of hand
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      Yes, I know, but I'm willing to give it a good shot. If I fail, I fail, but I think I'll learn something useful. I guess "Nothing ventured, nothing gained" applies here very well.
    • Steven Petersen
       
      This standard will have to be updated a lot. Technology seems to change very frequently. What is advanced today may very well be obsolete tomorrow. More importantly, the variety of technology out there makes this a nightmare. You might be in one district that utilizes one type of application then go to another district that uses a totally different platform for the same task.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I'm with you all on this. It's called information overload. Moderation in all things is GOOD. Too much drink, we know what it does. Too much food, we know what that does. Too much technology, oh nooooo what could that do. Moderation in all things will bring a balance
  • Selects and uses technologies appropriate to the content that enhance learning
    • Ashley Weaver
       
      I definitely need to work on this standard. Everything seems so new and unfamiliar. I hope I can learn through this course which tools are appropriate for my students and curriculum.
    • rcordes1961
       
      Ashley, it is very difficult to determine what strategy or technology is best to use when, especially, when there are so many different options out there for an instructor to use online. I guess we just need to keep an open mind and adjust accordingly because new technology is always being developed.
    • Laura Eklund
       
      This is also something I need to work on. There are so many online tools that are available to use, but I feel overwhelmed by the number available to us.
    • Joleen Louwsma
       
      I am currently using Moodle for several of my classes. I don't use the "tools" to make my classes more engaging. My goal is to use the Moodle as more than a homework repository. I think we all have good intentions on adding technology , but we get bogged down in the routines. This class is a great way to explore new "tools". :)
    • Jeffrey Haverland
       
      Technology is such a difficult thing because it is ever changing, and it seems that by the time we get it loaded on our machines, life has moved on without us. The other issue is the amount of tools that are available for use because time to explore is rather limited.
    • David Olson
       
      I have not yet figured out what technology is fun, and what technology is actually useful in teaching.
    • Melissa Hesner
       
      I believe a lot of teachers (myself included) are stuck in using technology as an add-on to learning. For example, my 6th grade students are currently creating Google presentations about extraterrestrial locations. The presentations are very nice and the practice of making and presenting them will help communication skills, but the creation of the presentation itself will not enhance their learning of the science content. I have simply integrated a different media for presentation. We need to use technology in pedagogy not a superficial add-on.
  • Sets and models clear expectations for appropriate behavior and proper interaction
    • Ashley Weaver
       
      Critical piece when working with young adults in this media age!
    • Chip Bishop
       
      I would agree, and add that teachers also, to be reminded of what is appropriate. You see all too often where a teacher is being accused of inappropriate behavior while use social media sites.
  • ensure academic integrity
    • Ashley Weaver
       
      It is so important to teach them media literacy. I know this is a fear that my fellow teachers have about moving to online learning, but academic integrity should be part of the curriculum!
    • Shirley Horstman
       
      Academic integrity is necessary when learning online! One also needs to teach students how to filter through all the information to find the accurate sources.
    • mhauser
       
      Academic integrity has been an issue long before the development of the internet. I started out as an English teacher and have several tales of the plagiarized or bogus research paper. I moved to the role of teacher librarian in '95 as the internet surged into our lives. what an interesting dynamic it is, but the issues go back to basic human ideas of right and wrong. I very much appreciate that the teaching standards, the core and the 21st Century Skills all address this fundamental issue of working with people.
  • Demonstrates techniques for dealing with issues arising from inappropriate student technological use
    • david moeller
       
      this can be difficult. but it seems that there are tools in place in our LMS's to choose to moderate what students are posting, and disallow any inappropriate comments. or at least delete them shortly after their initial posting. email alerts make this easier.
    • Matt Tracy
       
      Isn't it amazing just how little the students understand about what is appropriate and inappropriate online?
    • April Tidwell
       
      I am constantly amazed at what a student thinks is appropriate as well. Most of our teachers are concerned about going 1:1 becasue of this reason.
  • Demonstrates competence in content knowledge (including technological knowledge) appropriate to the instructional position
  • Assists students with technology used in the course
    • Laura Eklund
       
      With my experience so far in teaching it seems that the students will be assisting me with the technology. My students seem much more knowledgeable than me.
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      I think they have more time to just explore than we do. What I dislike most about exploring technology is the amount of time it takes.
    • hollysoby
       
      I've noticed how many basic things kids don't know about technology, though. Like the one I notice the most is they do not know how to use Google - if they are looking for answers to questions, they post the full question. While I think there are a lot of things they are better at than we are, we still need to stay on top of the technology that matters most to us so they can learn the best ways to use things.
  • Understands student motivation and uses techniques to engage students (Varvel V.D, ITS 4.d)
    • Julia Schreckengast
       
      Engaging students is a constant struggle for me in my mathematics classes. Any appropriate technology to assist in that would be helpful.
    • Joleen Louwsma
       
      I also struggle with engaging students in the Language Arts classroom. Getting students to try new things isn't always easy, but I think they get bored with some technology. Finding and perfecting different technoloical ideas may help students to stay engaged.
    • Kathryn Christensen
       
      I also think students get bored with technology tools. The key question is...are you use the correct technology tool? Our students (or at least most of the class) will get bored if there is fluke during the lesson and will notice if the tool doesn't fit the lesson well.
    • Jeffrey Haverland
       
      Student motivation is a concern for me when considering online learning. There is something about a living, breathing, and physically accessible educator that brings me peace of mind.
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      My challenge is to translate what some of these tools do in relation to what I traditionally do with a group of students. If I think through the tool plus the strategies I use in class...what new products could be developed? Kind of boggles the mind.
    • Boyd Card
       
      Engaging students is a little work at times. Students have developed so many skills with portable technolgoy they carry with them,the first challenge is to get them present then get them to engage??
  • Demonstrates effective instructional strategies and techniques, appropriate for online education, that align with course objectives and assessment (SREB
    • Julia Schreckengast
       
      Using online instruction for a high school class requires an appropriate balance between the online and the in class instruction.
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      Finding that balance may be challenge. I have not thought deeply about some of the strategies we use in the district butI believe online might be interesting to use with AIW...both teachers and as we move to students reflecting on their work.
  • informs student of their rights to privacy and the conditions under which their work may be shared with others
    • Matt Tracy
       
      I wish the students were aware that privacy was okay and they don't have to share everything. This is a huge issue with the technology now available.
  • Maintains an online social presence that is a
    • Joleen Louwsma
       
      I'm wondering about building the relationship and discussions with online students. I build on student questions and anwers. How does the time delay affect the social aspect? How will I know if the students feel I'm approachable or unapproachable?
    • Kathryn Christensen
       
      I have been wondering the same thing but...our instructor has managed to gain my trust and is approchable. He has done this through timely and honest emails. Thanks Evan!!
    • Cassie Gruman
       
      I agree that Evan does seem very approachable and has provided helpful and timely feedback, but I too wonder how this is possible. I guess it still seems a bit overwhelming when I am not overly familiar with Moodle. Perhaps the best thing to do is have an initial activity like we had for this course where students introduce themselves in a creative manner and respond to others' introductions as well; it serves as an icebreaker.
    • Steven Petersen
       
      Contractually this one bothers me. It would almost appear that teachers will be required to work outside the contract time on a regular basis. This may lead to some legal issues.
  •  Demonstrates effective instructional strategies and techniques, appropriate for online education, that align with course objectives and assessment (SREB C.1, SREB G.6, Varvel V.C, ITS 3.d, ITS 4.b)
  • Communicates with students effectively and consistently
    • Kathryn Christensen
       
      Time consuming???? Any ideas on how to handle this with out being on consant email surveillance?
    • mhauser
       
      I've used e-mail and a blog to communicate with sophomore world history students for several years. E-mail is actually pretty fast. It's a great way for kids to ask for help. I think it's easier for the student to get my attention that way, because they're not competing for my attention, and they're not embarrassed about the help they're asking for. I respond to their blog posts privately. They receive my comments in both an e-mail and in a reply on the blog. I think your question about constant surveillance is a good one. It's easy to respond quickly to e-mail questions, but I've found that I need to establish a time to respond to their blog entries. Depending on the class, you would have to determine how often and when you'd respond. Otherwise you'd be constantly distracted.
    • Deb Ritchie
       
      An organized approach to responding has been an issue for me this year. I'm likeing the model Evan is using in this course with specific days we can expect assignments to be graded and specific times he will be checking e-mail, etc. I think I will borrow from that idea. Of course, the burden is eased when we are also seeing students fact to face and not just online.
  • encourages collaboration
    • Kathryn Christensen
       
      Great to see so many tools for problem solving with a partner (no matter what you teach)!
    • Amy Kemp
       
      I agree.  I feel it is very important to have that learning community to allow the students to collaborate.  Let's face it, the less we say, the more they learn!
  • including student-teacher, student-student, and student-content
    • Cassie Gruman
       
      With teaching middle school social studies, I am constantly changing up the dynamic of my classroom. Students work individually, in pairs, in small groups, as a whole class, individually conference with me, deliver individual and group presentation, etc. I think changing the arrangement helps middle school students to refocus and stay interested in the material. At first I though this would be difficult to accomplish online; however, I am now realizing that there are many different ways to interact through a wide array of tools.
  • including rubrics for student performances and participation
    • Cassie Gruman
       
      My students are always wanting to know what they are going to be graded on and how they can earn an A. Originally I thought creating a rubric would be a stressful task, but now I have found that rubrics make grading much easier. Also, the feedback provided on the rubric is more beneficial and detailed for students. I also have found that students are more productive and focused on work days, as they know my expectations ahead of time, and they know exactly what they need to do to earn the grade they desire. Certainly with online learning, a rubric would be a key communication tool in guiding students when the instructor might not be readily available to answer questions.
  • Utilizes a course evaluation and student feedback data to improve the course
    • Cassie Gruman
       
      My first year of teaching I had both a self-evaluation for students and a course evaluation to gain an understanding of how students felt the year had gone. I have not done this since, probably because I use several formative assessment strategies throughout each unit to gauge student understanding. I definitely think a course and/or instructor evaluation would be essential in an online learning environment, especially for those of us just starting out, so we can use students' suggestions to better improve our instruction.
    • Nancy Peterman
       
      I am in agreement with you about the need for course and instructor evaluations, but I think a lot of times it gets overlooked or dropped.
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      The most effective course evaluation is frequent and ongoing. Feedback from students is more specific right after an activity or unit than at the end of the school year. Perhaps a course evaluation could be divided into sections to be completed at appropriate times throughout the year.
    • Boyd Card
       
      Having just finished teaching a college class I am awaiting the the student feedback the college requires the students to fill out under the supervison of another person. It will be informative to read what they belive my teaching had done for them.
    • April Tidwell
       
      I use survey monkey for my evaluations. I do it by quarters. It's great because it is free, and it complies the data for you. I get a lot of good information from these surveys and would definitely continue to do this with an online course.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I appreciate data. I appreciate the time needed to look at the data. Until we are able to become more reflective practitioners during the school year, looking at data won't necessarily happen. I know how much time I take to look at data. I am not harried during the summer. When professional development allows for time to be reflective in our teaching, I do think greater results will happen.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      As much data as we have at our finger tips, I feel the variable that consistently comes through is the relationship piece. Teaching over the ICN is different than teaching in a face to face. As an instructor of a college level class, my evaluations have always suffered when comparing the face to face students with the students who are at another site. They really don't have any idea what I am like during the natural coffee breaks because of that relationship piece that is lacking. Having a face to face relationship is different than having an online relationship, yet I do believe it's easier to build in person. Many contacts via email doesn't necessarily build it, yet quick responses in email can help....but being that 24/7 teacher is really hard as we juggle our own lives.
  • Meets the professional teaching standards established by a state-licensing agency, or has the academic credentials in the field in which he or she is teaching (SREB A.1, Varvel II.A)
    • Jeffrey Haverland
       
      This is really a critical piece because even thought the course is online, it better be high quality educators who are delivering it through the lens of sound educational practices. One of my biggest fears is online learning opening up a venue for for anyone who thinks they would be better at teaching than trained educators.
    • Boyd Card
       
      As a vocational instructor it is imperative to know your content and be prepared to present it in a manor that not only tranfers the knowledge to the student but in a way that it is retained- (safety)
    • Melissa Hesner
       
      Well said, Jeffrey! I believe it takes cream of the crop teachers who have deep understanding of teaching and learning to teach online. It is hard for some to make learning activities meaningful and rigorous in a face-to-face setting, and to do so in an online setting would be even harder, especially when considering effective instruction for the content area.
  • • Knows the content of the subject to be taught and understands how to teach the content to students (SREB A.3, Varvel II.A, ITS 2.a)
    • Jeffrey Haverland
       
      This really goes along with what I wrote above. Not only do online instructors need to understand teaching and learning, they also need to have the background to teach that course. We can all be "experts" at things we know nothing about--Wikipedia is a great example of this, but the ability to "impart" this knowledge on others needs to be controlled.
    • Steven Petersen
       
      This one has troubled me lately. When I began teaching at the post-secondary level there was a certification required. Now you only have to have enough credits in the topic area to teach it. There is no certification required. This does not insure that the person teaching the course actually knows how to teach.
    • Jessica White
       
      I had a professor in college tell me that intelligence is one thing that separates great teachers from good teachers. I have never forgotten this, and I see it over and over. Teachers need to know the content, but also need to know how to teach. You can't have one without the other.
  • Knows and aligns instruction to the achievement goals
    • Shirley Horstman
       
      To maximize knowledge the subject area content must be aligned to the goals. Assessment must also be aligned!
  • Understands and uses data from assessments to guide instruction
  • Provides substantive, timely, and constructive feedback to students
    • Deborah Ausborn
       
      I have found that timely feedback is vital for student learning. It avoids future similar mistakes and when not provided, can lead to feelings of failure on the student's part. Timely feedback can nip most problems in the bud.
    • Boyd Card
       
      Timely feed back is very important. It allows students to grow with direction.
  • Creates a safe environment, managing conflict (Varvel VII.D, ITS 6.e)
    • Lynne Devaney
       
      While I do not have any experience of any kind in the online teaching world, Evan may know, what does conflict look like between students in the online world?
  • Designs the structure of the course and the presentation of the content to best enhance student learning, including using unit/lesson overviews and reviews, using patterns in lesson sequencing, and using appropriate visual web design techniques
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      I have taken "online courses" for graduate credit in which the structure of the course was nothing more than a list of assignments to complete outside the Moodle and snail mail to the instructor. Those poor examples certainly helped me understand the importance of the structure and presentation of online courses!
    • Boyd Card
       
      I would have to say I had the same experience a long time ago with a computer class I took on line. From what I am experiencing so far this will not be that type of course. We will be experiencing may stuyles and types of learning! : )
    • hollysoby
       
      I'm really excited about the blended learning idea - I'm already thinking of how I can really change how I teach publications - I have some students who have had a pre-req writing class, some who haven't, some who are brand new, other with experience, and I think I can use online learning to offer more ways to make sure all those groups are learning and being challenged.
  • Promotes learning through online collaboration group work that is goal-oriented and focused
    • Kathy Hageman
       
      Well-designed online collaborative learning activities, which provide a greater opportunity for a student to work at his or her own pace, may be less threatening and result in greater participation than in-class group work.
    • Heather Gould
       
      I agree, however, it's an adjustment for students. I do feel the collaborative element is essential regardless of the modality of the learning. I work with middle school students through our AEA 267 National Day on Writing project. It's been interesting to watch some students flourish with collaboration at a distance, while others struggle working with people they can't 'see'.
  • appropriate for online learning
    • Bev Berns
       
      What would be examples of 'multiple assessment instruments here? Does this refer to typical rubrics?
    • Deb Ritchie
       
      Hmmm. Using moodle there could be an on-line multiple choice test, a blog entry, and insightful forum posts. Would those be multiple assessment instruments?
  • instruments
    • Tresa Zaragoza
       
      Not everyone learns the same so this is a very important part of any teaching.
  • Aligns assessment with course objectives
  • Continuously uses data to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of instructional strategies
    • April Tidwell
       
      This is a BIG push in our district. They have spent a lot of time and money in data collection, and now the push is to get teachers to actually use the data to drive in struction
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I find using the data is the hardest component. We have so much data within our district, yet the time variable is needed in order to make change concerning this data.
  • interaction
    • April Tidwell
       
      I'm amazed how kids seems to interact more on line then they will in class. I hosted a chat during a class period and kids that never raise their hand in class were contributing and even leading the discussion. I thing online learning helps this generation connect in a learning community.
  • age and ability level
    • Heather Gould
       
      In the research I've read about age and ability level, I was surprised to learn that an instructor cannot assume that the young are tech savvy and older participants will struggle with technology. There is no research to support this, as sometimes just the opposite is the case.
  • Provides opportunities that enable student self-assessment and pre-assessment within courses
  • Identifies and communicates learning outcomes and expectations through a course overview/orientation
    • hollysoby
       
      I'm hoping I can use online learning to make standards and expectations clear to students upfront - currently I give them packets every unit with the plan nad assignments for that unit, and I'm hoping Moodle makes that process easier, more clear and less dead tree intensive.
    • Tim Hadley
       
      You should have chosen green as your highlighter color. :) Saving trees is great for all. Beyond saving trees, I think having something that students can always access anywhere is great. Whether they are at a friend's house, on the bus or at grandma's in another state, items posted online can be found. I think it elimnates some of the excuse that "I didn't know what was due."
  • multiple assessment
  • Selects and understands how to evaluate learning materials and resources that align with the context and enhance learning (SREB C.15, SREB M.4, Varvel IV.C, ITS 3.e, ITS 4.f)
    • Amy Kemp
       
      In Math, choosing the appropriate resource is critical as it is in any course.
    • Jason Gomez
       
      This is going to be hard; knowing how to grade it? I hope there is a rubric that is easy to follow.
  • Understands and uses course content that complies with intellectual property rights and fair use, and assists students in complying as well
    • Tim Hadley
       
      If I struggle with any area, it is probably making sure that what I am using is not a violation of this standard. I suppose I grew up in a family that shared everything, so when it comes to the property rights of others, I share and share alike.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I have taught that explaining it at the kindergarten level can enhance a student's ability to work the material in a manner that becomes his/her idea. It's really hard to plagarize when it's written in kindergarten terms.
  • Networks with others involved in online education for the purpose of professional growth (SREB L.1, ITS 7.b)
  • Applies research, knowledge, and skills from professional growth to improve practice
    • Victoria Guilliatt
       
      I want to be able to use the new information I learn in the this class and apply it to my library classes that I teach in the elementary.
    • Victoria Guilliatt
       
      I plan to use the knowledge I gain from this class with my students.
  •  Is knowledgeable and has the ability to use  computer programs required in online education to improve learning and teaching, including course management software (CMS) and synchronous / asynchronous communication tools (chat, email, web 2.0, videoconferencing, webinar, whiteboard, etc.) (SREB B.3, Varvel III.B)
  • Demonstrates competence in planning, designing, and incorporating instructional strategies (ITS 3)
    • Jason Gomez
       
      This could take a while for me; I'm still learning how to do this stuff let a lone plan, design, & incorporate. I can already see there will be a lot of trial & error this coming year
  • Iowa Core
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      There is so much to learn about the Iowa Core. I'm so glad there is a great deal of exposure within this class.
  • multiple intelligences
  • constructivism, behaviorism, cognitivism, connectivism, and group theory
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      All these theories will bring a better understanding to educators when it is worked into our vocabulary.
  • community
  •  
    See title
Angie Graham

ollie1reppert: Iowa Online Course Standards - 0 views

    • Sandra Campie
       
      Since we are learning online this has to be especially clear. When it is vague, students will have trouble meeting the goal.
    • Brian Sauerbrei
       
      Do you have any suggestions or guidelines to make that happen? I find that to be a challenge when I'm teaching face to face with some students. That has been a challenge taking this OLLIE class the first week.
  • The course is easy and logical to navigate, including self-describing links
    • Brian Sauerbrei
       
      This is crucial. Every time a specific step is given, the next step has to be easily seen and describe. It is like the instructions for assembling an item.
    • Mike Adair
       
      YEs, and if ever made models like I did as a kid, how many times did you sjip steps to get to the more interesting part? Students today, I find, do the same exact thing in their learning. Lack of patience? Too short an attention span? Lousy instruction by the teacher?
    • susan strube
       
      I'm starting to see more of a connection between what Robert is having us do in our moodle course and what this standard is expecting. Who knew that just the layout of a course on line would be an expectation?
    • Jill Schany
       
      I agree that this is one of the most important things in the expectations of an online course. When I get frustrated by the layout, I tend to give up. I think students do the same.
    • Brian Sauerbrei
       
      It must take hours and hours and hours to set up a long-term online class. My tech person at school there are education computer platforms(programs) that are built on teachers being able to click, drag, and drop links, assignments, blogs, etc. into certain areas of a web page. The computer does all the setup tasks, so the teacher doesn't have to spend the time.
    • Sandra Campie
       
      I think it is important that pages are not too long and it doesn't take a ton of clicking to get where you need to go.
  • ...11 more annotations...
  • Sufficient learning resources and materials
    • Mike Adair
       
      No doubt that suffucient resources are needed, but with the major belt-tightening education is under will we, the teachers, be forced to use the Internet for everything in the way of resources and materials? Will our kids in time lose touch with other ways to research topics or create non-tech learning models?
    • Deanna Tegeler
       
      We are struggling to get the technology resources we want/need. We were initially told 15 computers per classroom which got changed to 15 computers per three classrooms. This has been a huge challenge in my freshmen course that does not have a text. All of it is suppose to be teacher generated but many days due to lack of technology we are making a lot of paper copies.
    • susan strube
       
      We are luck to have a grant that funded our 1:1 computer initiative for next year. Now if we can just troubleshoot in a timely fashion. Technology isn't effective if it doesn't work, so I hope the snags are minimal. Planning lessons around and with technology very frustrating if it doesn't work as planned.
  • The course provider offers orientation training.
    • Mike Adair
       
      A vital component, but I wonder if sometimes we take for granted how technologically-developed our students are without taking into consideration that they still need proper inservicing to get the most out of what we're offering. This class is a perfect example of that.
  • The self-introduction by the instructor is appropriate and available online, and students are likewise asked to introduce themselves to the class.
    • Kristina Greenfield
       
      I never thought about the community component of an online course until we had to introduce ourselves. I originally was skeptical of collaborating with other people via the internet because I didn't think it would feel like a community or that I would get to know my fellow students. However, I've been surprised at how I already feel like I'm communicating and collaborating with my group members.
  • • Information literacy and communication skills are incorporated and taught as an integral part of the curriculum.
    • susan strube
       
      Unfortunately this is a problem for some teachers who believe they only have to be competent in a content area and do not feel able/competent to address reading and writing and reserch standards integral to all education . It appears more and more that teachers need to be "general practitioners" as much as they do "specialists" in their content area.
    • Angie Graham
       
      I believe that technology will force teachers to step out of their comfort area.
    • Angie Graham
       
      I believe that technology will force teachers to step out of their comfort area.
  • Instruction provides students with multiple learning paths to master the content, addressing individual student needs, learning styles and preferences.
    • susan strube
       
      I believe this addresses differentiation, which is an emphasis in our district right now. I find this to be one of the most difficult parts of education.