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Articles: Design - 1 views

    • sraymond21
       
      KISS...Keep it simple, um...silly.
  • Your presentation is for the benefit of the audience. But boring an audience with bullet point after bullet point is of little benefit to them.
    • sraymond21
       
      I am guilty of this...trying to figure out how I can honor this and make notes more meaningful.
  • ...36 more annotations...
  • People should be able to comprehend each one in about three seconds.
    • debraschindler
       
      Another great rule of thumb!
    • kimkaz
       
      I would have selected this text also.  It's powerful to think that an image can promote discussion with limited time and attention.
    • sraymond21
       
      This is a helpful takeaway!
  • use contrast to focus attention
    • sraymond21
       
      I would like to get better at using this idea...
  • Highlight key points within bullet points
    • sraymond21
       
      Maybe this will help pme fix my "notes" slides.
    • stephhallberg
       
      I think, too, the white background with the blue contrasting text is visually appealing.
  • Slides with visual unity look as though the same person created them and make your message feel cohesive.
    • stephhallberg
       
      This is something else that I need to consider when developing my two slides for this week.
  • Pretend as though you are an audience member for your upcoming presentation. Do any slides feel text heavy?
    • stephhallberg
       
      This is where spending time in the slide sorter would help to see the slides from the audience's point of view.
  • Think of it as an approach to rehearsing your slides.
    • stephhallberg
       
      The key words can also let the audience know the main topic while not being bored with too much text.  
  • Don’t submit to the urge to add unrelated “decorations” to the slide.
    • stephhallberg
       
      Reynolds also says these "decorations" will help you lose credibility, too.
  • ever turn your back on the audience and read text from the slide word for word.
    • debraschindler
       
      This always drives me nuts when I see presenters do this
  • And this is even better…
    • debraschindler
       
      I would have never thought to do this but it does create a last image in your mind and as a presenter you know what its referring to so there wouldn't be the 'reading from the slide' effect
  • Unity
    • debraschindler
       
      I have actually seen the presentation below and as a viewer thought of how well-done it was.
  • Highlight the key phrases that you will help you rehearse for your presentation
    • debraschindler
       
      The bolding/highlighting key text really does improve the quality of the slide
    • kimkaz
       
      It's like advertising.  Simple, clear, powerful choices of text features and structures to draw attention to the content.
  • Depending on your content, you may be able to convert each bullet point into a separate image
    • debraschindler
       
      This is really interesting approach and I'm wanting to try it out in the near future. It easily keeps the audience engaged as they see images but are waiting to hear the connection/content
  • Your slides should have plenty of “white space” or “negative space.” Do not feel compelled to fill empty areas on your slide with your logo or other unnecessary graphics or text boxes that do not contribute to better understanding. The less clutter you have on your slide, the more powerful your visual message will become.
    • tamela hatcher
       
      I like the idea of having contrast and white space.
  • This slide is not unusual, but it is not a visual aid,it is more like an “eye chart.”
    • tamela hatcher
       
      My draft looked very much like this "eye chart".
  • Sans-Serif
    • tamela hatcher
       
      I could not find this option on my document to use.  Is there a trick to it?  It is not under my S drop down menu.
  • Use video and audio when appropriate.
    • tamela hatcher
       
      I still need to figure out how to download the video links so I am not dependent on the internet and jumping in and out of the presentation with links as I find this distracting.
  • logical flow
    • tamela hatcher
       
      I love the sorter method.  It really helps you see the flow.
  • The best slides may have no text at all.
    • kimkaz
       
      I feel that this is one of the most powerful sentences in this article.  "A picture tells a thousand words."  Photos and graphics can promote conversation!
  • Object builds (also called animations), such as bullet points, should not be animated on every slide. Some animation is a good thing, but stick to the most subtle and professional (similar to what you might see on the evening TV news broadcast).
    • kimkaz
       
      Animation can be incredible annoying.  I think the one that is most grating to me is the typwriter one.  It would be cool to use it for emphasis like for acronym. I totally agree limit transitions.
  • However, tables can lack impact on a visceral level.
    • kimkaz
       
      Data is easily skewed if the x or y access isn't labeled properly or scaled with proper perspective.
  • Just because the software lets you
    • kimkaz
       
      ...   Just because the software lets you do something it doesn't mean you should.  This caught my eye because I've fallen in the trap of bells and whistles.  I'm sure audiences have found my presentations to be extremely annoying at times when I 'tried out" capabilities of software.
  • learn more effectively from multimedia messages when they’re stripped of extraneous words, graphics, animation, and sounds.
    • kimkaz
       
      I like to use video in my presentations.  I think it's a great way to have an expert from the field punctuate my message.  It's also a good way to engage the audience in your theme.  I do believe they should be short, however, no more than 2 minutes.
  • You’ll reinforce your message and make it easier for people to get what you’re saying. Here’s an “after” slide to illustrate:
    • kimkaz
       
      Love this graphic.  It's clear and goes with the theme of the concept.  
  • But there’s beauty and clarity in restraint.
    • kimkaz
       
      Indeed, less is more.  Don't bring in an elephant to teach the color grey.
  • If they fall below 24 pt then you might be on to something.
    • kimkaz
       
      If you have to reduce the font size below 24 to get all of the text on the slide then it may be too text heavy.
  • Replace bullet points with images
    • kimkaz
       
      Love this idea.  I will definitely use it in my next presentation!
  • Don’t let your message and your ability to tell a story get derailed by slides that are unnecessarily complicated, busy, or full of what Edward Tufte calls “chart junk.”
    • julievanmanen
       
      Too much information can become a distraction and will take away from the point you are trying to "sell" the audience.
  • Use high-quality graphics including photographs.
    • julievanmanen
       
      Using high-quality graphics shows you have an interest in your topic besides looking professional.
  • Used to show percentages. Limit the slices to 4-6 and contrast the most important slice either with color or by exploding the slice
    • julievanmanen
       
      Again - it goes back to keeping it simple!
  • Color evokes feelings. Color is emotional. The right color can help persuade and motivate. Studies show that color usage can increase interest and improve learning comprehension
    • julievanmanen
       
      This is a little off the subject, but this is why I believe that colorful classrooms are important in the middle school and high school levels as well!
  • and retention
  • Remember, the slides are meant to support the narration of the speaker, not make the speaker superfluous
    • julievanmanen
       
      This is true in any type of presentation. Visuals should be an asset to the presentation, but not take over the message.
3More

PowToon, free business presentation software animated video maker and PowerPoint altern... - 1 views

shared by maryblocker on 19 Sep 13 - No Cached
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    Animated videos and presentations
  •  
    Animated videos and presentations
  •  
    Add animation to your course with PowToon.
1More

Secret Recipes - 0 views

  •  
    good resource for animation tips
129More

Articles: Design - 0 views

  • The less clutter you have on your slide, the more powerful your visual message will become.
    • rabraham
       
      This is something that will help transform presentations.  Keeping it simple will ensure the audience stays engaged.
  • Instead of a copy of your PowerPoint slides, it is far better to prepare a written document which highlights your content from the presentation and expands on that content.
    • rabraham
       
      This is a great way to keep the talking points limited.  I think it will be great to use with students who are absent for the lessons too.
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I was glad to see that they still advise giving a document if the thought is to not give out the slide handouts. This is good for students who are absent.
  • You will be able to notice more extraneous pieces of visual data that can be removed to increase visual clarity and improve communication.
    • rabraham
       
      Slide Sorter view helps you to see the big picture of the entire presentation put together.
  • ...57 more annotations...
  • But including a healthy amount of white space sharpens viewers’ focus by isolating elements.
    • rabraham
       
      This is a key element to remember.
    • dougmay
       
      I wouldn't have thought of this, but this slide looks good. The old thought process was to not have extra space.
  • Highlight the key phrases that you will help you rehearse for your presentation
    • rabraham
       
      This is a good step to simplify what the audiences sees and may keep them interested because they can't simply read the rest of the information.
  • Listeners will get bored very quickly if they are asked to endure slide after slide of animation. For transitions between slides, use no more than two-three different types of transition effects and do not place transition
    • suzdohrer
       
      I've struggled with using animations for transitions and lists. Now I read it may not be worth it. Yeah, back to basics and keep it simple.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      I will admit that I never use animations or transitions in any of my presentations. Not even a subtle fade. Not only is it extra junk, but it can add an hour to your development time. The most I do are builds. If I have a slide with an important point that I want to reveal, I will make two copies of the slide, and delete the "revealed" info on the first one. Then when I advance to the next slide, voila, I have a "transition".
    • dougmay
       
      With my students presentations, It sooooo delayed their presentations with all of their animartions and transitions. I, too, kept thinking of these articles.
  • Gill Sans
  • Cut out the extraneous content. Speak to that content when you present
    • suzdohrer
       
      This is when I move the cut text or additional text notes to the "Notes" section of the powerpoint, below the slide shot. Then, I like to print-out the slides to show the notes for my presentation.
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I was thinking that I would be using the notes area much more too. I've even been using it to keep the information of where I got the image on the slide so that I can decide where to add that later.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      For many people, the notes section is really good. If you haven't tried the presenter view within Power Point, it is worth trying. On your computer, you can see your current slide, the next slide coming up, the notes that you have, and a timer/clock. The audience only sees your slide.
    • ney4cy
       
      I have done so few PowerPoints but this was a great tip. I will be checking out my notes section and presenter for sure.
  • The blurred backgrounds set off the stark white illustrations for quick visual processing:
    • suzdohrer
       
      I do not have an artisticy background, but I now think this blurred background image will be a use ful tool.
  • You can achieve this through consistent type styles, color, image treatment, and element placement throughout the slide deck.
    • suzdohrer
       
      Another artistic point of placement and imagery through cohesiveness. I worry that I do not have the natural talent to put this together on my own, but I do see the real difference.
    • chaneline
       
      Some presenters use lots of different colors, fonts and backgrounds.  May it's just because they can and they haven't taken this course.  The visual clutter distracts from the content and decreases the cohesiveness.
    • mrswalker_
       
      I like creating templates using Google Slides to ensure that colors and fonts translate to all of the slides in a deck.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      We kind of pooh-pooh color and design elements in learning, as though it is just pretty-ness. But, it does have a big effect, and it is worth it to improve one's sense of color combination.
  • If you have a detailed handout or publication for the audience to be passed out after your talk, you need not feel compelled to fill your PowerPoint slides with a great deal of text.
    • mgoodwin5
       
      I think this is a great point. The more I'm reading about what should (or is appropriate) be on a slide for the best presentations, it is better to have less, than more.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Do you think the "after" is important? Is it better to pass it out after or before?
    • ney4cy
       
      interesting point.At the presentation I attend Monday afternoon the speaker handed out a document before he started his talk. in a way I liked being able to dot notes or highlight an idea or concept I wanted to review more closely later, but on the other hand it was very distracting to be leafing through the document trying to find the page that matched up with what he was discussing. I guess I would say it is better to wait till after your talk is done.
  • Use the same font set throughout your entire slide presentation, and use no more than two complementary fonts (e.g., Arial and Arial Bold).
    • mgoodwin5
       
      This is something that we stress to our students, since based on what students will usually do is have many different text fonts and sizes. They tend to use whatever looks best for each slide, instead of having the presentation look more smooth and have a togetherness.
    • mrswalker_
       
      I like using two fonts on slides: one to convey the big idea (title) and another to convey the supporting ideas (text).
    • Evan Abbey
       
      My rule of thumb is no more than two. One for headers, one for text (though I often use the same for each). I use a sans-serif font for my text, and either the same sans-serif font for my headers, or a designer font to communicate a special theme. I never use serif fonts.
    • ney4cy
       
      Okay,Okay no more Comic Sans
  • Use the same font set throughout your entire slide presentation, and use no more than two complementary fonts (e.g., Arial and Arial Bold).
  • Images can be very powerful and effective if used with careful intention.
    • mgoodwin5
       
      This is so true. Many times the image used, is what immediately gets the audiences attention and interest. Images are very powerful. i.e. "A picture is worth a thousand words."
    • mrswalker_
       
      I like the idea of using text over images, but it has to be the right image! This creates one image for students to remember, rather than an idea and an image.
  • Lots of extras actually take away meaning because they become a distraction.
    • mgoodwin5
       
      As goes with the statement, "Less is more." I completely understand that too much can be a distraction for the eye. Too much on a slide, take s away the meaning and I feel it also makes a person wonder what they should focus on, such as what is the most important point I'm supposed to be receiving from this slide?
    • dougmay
       
      Agreed!
  • The first step is admitting that you have a problem
    • mgoodwin5
       
      Many of my slides in my presentations either look like this, or have started out like this. This is exactly what I need to work on! Eliminating some of the bullet points and a lot of text!
  • Depending on your content, you may be able to convert each bullet point into a separate image on one slide or over several slides.
    • mgoodwin5
       
      Here is what I'm going to work towards doing. Since learning about Zen, I realize I'm definitely adding too much to my slides, whether it be text or bullets. By using images, or at least less text and bullets, it appears presentations will be much more appealing and interesting to the audience. I really like the idea of using the images instead of any text at all. Then the presenter (me) will expand on the meaning of the image or what it stands for.
  • Your slides should have plenty of “white space” or “negative space.” Do not feel compelled to fill empty areas on your slide with your logo or other unnecessary graphics or text boxes that do not contribute to better understanding.
    • chaneline
       
      This point has been huge for me.  I really thought I would want to fill up the slide with information, not any more.  I see the power of simplicity of the white or negative space.
    • mrswalker_
       
      This is a great idea- I like the idea of negative space better than white space. My classroom is really bright so light text on a dark background sometimes works better than white.
  • No audience will be excited about a cookie-cutter presentation, and we must therefore shy away from any supporting visuals, such as the ubiquitous PowerPoint Design Template, that suggests your presentation is formulaic or prepackaged.You can make your own background templates which will be more tailored to your needs.
    • chaneline
       
      This lead me to think about use of a white background.  I was so afraid of it because it seemed boring, but with the use of visuals, a white background can be powerful and increase the interest of the slide.
  • Avoid off-the-shelf clip art (though your own sketches & drawings can be a refreshing change if used consistently throughout the visuals).
    • chaneline
       
      Some presenters overuse cartoon type Clipart, maybe because it's easier, that's what they are used to, they are trying to be funny/cute or they haven't learned the power of a visual image/picture within a presentation.  
    • aboevers
       
      I don't think I will be drawing my own art either!
  • Go through your bullet points and try to highlight the main point of each bullet point. Try to bold only the key parts of each point — limit it to as few words as possible.
    • mrswalker_
       
      Great idea to take it step by step rather than just trying to cut a lot of information at once. 
  • Go through your bullet points and try to highlight the main point of each bullet point. Try to bold only the key parts of each point — limit it to as few words as possible.
  • It is very common for people to “brain dump” all of their ideas or thoughts into “stream of consciousness” bullet points as they create slides.
    • chaneline
       
      I think this happens because you want to make sure that all of the points you feel are important are given to the audience.  It has been one of the most eye opening concepts from this course.  I made note cards for my presentation, rather than putting all of the info on the slide. " Redundancy effect" is powerful!
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      Yes, I had always thought bullet points were a good thing! Oh how wrong I was!
    • ney4cy
       
      I thought bullet points would be superior to long connected text or narrative on a slide. I really felt it was the most effective way to get your message out. Now I have seen the light!
    • vmcgee
       
      Me too.  I have been using bullet points extensively all year.  Google slides makes it very easy to do so...
  • The best slides may have no text at all
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      It is interesting to go to presentations while I'm taking this class. I took the ISEA's mandatory reporter training last week and it was an RN on a video with powerpoint slides for 3 hours. Lots of text, the crayon template and a graph that she kept going back to that you couldn't even read due to tiny font. Death by PowerPoint!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      This is true. It also is somewhat of a curse. You can get to the point where you can't see any presentation without being critical of it :)
    • vmcgee
       
      Absolutely.  Just today I had to give a presentation to a class on behalf of another teacher.  It had WAY too much text and I had great difficulty keeping the attention of 13 year old students.  I couldn't help but think of this class while presenting.
    • dougmay
       
      In the past, I would have a hard time with no text. My thought was that the slide should do the work. My students did presentations and I kept wanting to critique their slides.
  • Presenters are usually guilty of including too much data in their on-screen charts
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      This can be tricky when you really need to get all of the data in the hands of your audience. What to leave out?
    • ney4cy
       
      I guess this is where the analog planning is helpful. Along with the elevator test.
  • though your own sketches & drawings can be a refreshing change if used consistently throughout the visuals)
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I had not thought about the use of your own sketches and drawings. I would be afraid that it would look corny, like the clip art, but I'm also intrigued to try this!
    • ney4cy
       
      It does sound interesting. I think it would nice to try student drawings too when using this if educators or students themselves.
  • The trick becomes finding just the right image(s)
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      This is where I feel that I could take hours second guessing my choice of image, or trying to edit it to work.
    • ney4cy
       
      I agree. I have already been out looking, and I just keep looking and looking. I am hoping it will get easier the more experience I have creating PowerPoints.
    • dougmay
       
      This can seem to take more time than the planning.
  • Use high-quality graphics including photographs.
    • mrswalker_
       
      My students LOVE seeing pictures of themselves in a presentation. I try to use student examples as often as possible to create images for presentations.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      This is a great idea! Especially for younger students!
  • But boring an audience with bullet point after bullet point is of little benefit to them
    • aboevers
       
      This reminds me of that first video we watched for this class and the gun image. That has stuck with me and it is all because of the image of the gun!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      I guess this goes to speak of the power of an image.
    • ney4cy
       
      I just sat through a presentation Monday afternoon on PLCs and Short Data Cycle. The presentaer was very engaging but his PowerPoint was not! Too much text and bullets very few images. I found myself critiquing his slides instead of listening to the message!
  • The right color can help persuade and motivate. Studies show that color usage can increase interest and improve learning comprehension and retention
    • aboevers
       
      Color can do so much, like make you feel stronger/weaker, or energize/soothe. That was why they painted our visiting team locker room pink!
  • This looks like they were going for the full-bleed background image effect but just missed
    • aboevers
       
      One of my classrooms has a projector that is slightly to the right and the image bleeds to the white board behind the screen. It is very distracting for me and my students!
  • in your slide deck
    • aboevers
       
      I have recently heard of a presentation set of slides referred to as a deck, but we certainly do not need 52 slides to present!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Well, this depends. Some presenters make one master deck and then "hide" the slides they don't want. For the next preso, they hide different slides. Also, it depends on how you use your slides. If you talk for each slide, then 52 is way to many. But if you are using builds or quick sequences of slides as a substitute for bulleted lists, you can get there pretty quick. My rule of thumb is one slide every two minutes, but I do have one preso with 70 slides in it for a 45 minute preso. It is the exception, not the rule.
    • ney4cy
       
      At a recent in-service the speaker had 3 PowerPoints open he retrieved slides from different presentations based on our dicussion. It made the informtion much more relevant to our school but at the same time created a distraction when he couldn't find a slide and had to flip back and forth.
  • the golden rule of PowerPoint presentations — always do what is right for your audience.
    • aboevers
       
      Shouldn't the rule state, "Present unto others as you would like presented to you?"
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Ha! Hilarious!
  • add unrelated “decorations
    • aboevers
       
      Keep the idea of purpose in mind constantly.
    • ney4cy
       
      This is was my typical slide! ALL bullet points.
    • pkmills
       
      Somehow that simple idea got very lost along the way.
  • “Sorry I missed your presentation. I hear it was great. Can you just send me your PowerPoint slides?” But if they are good slides, they will be of little use without you.
    • pkmills
       
      If someone had said this to me, I would have. Now if they say it to me I still will send them the slides. Ha Ha.
  • You can take your own high-quality photographs with your digital camera,
    • pkmills
       
      I ran into soem object that I need for my presentation that were "iffy" for me in the copyright area, so I decided to take my own pictures instead. I feel great about how it turned out.
  • So make sure your slides pass what I call the glance test: People should be able to comprehend each one in about three seconds
    • pkmills
       
      Love this idea. It's a good way for me to see if I am travelling down the right road.
  • Live long and prosper.
    • pkmills
       
      I found out that "Live long and prosper" was added by Leonard Nimoy for character and was based in his Jewish teachings.
  • By getting out of the Slide View and into the Slide Sorter view, you can see how the logical flow of your presentation is progressing. In this view you may decide to break up one slide into, say, two-three slides so that your presentation has a more natural and logical flow or process.
    • pkmills
       
      I used the sticky notes at the begginnig to check the flow of my presentation. I will use the sorter to check the presentation at the end of the creation process.
  • Try to avoid text-heavy (and sleep inducing) slides like this one
    • vmcgee
       
      I gave a presentation today on behalf of another teacher that was structured much like this slide.  It had too much text and information on it, and I found myself racing to get through it before I lost the attention of my audience.  Afterwards, it completely felt like a waste of time.
  • Not sure what two guys shaking hands in front of a globe has to do with the fertility rate in Japan. Yet even if we were talking about "international partnership" the image is still a cliché.
    • vmcgee
       
      It seems like I have seen some sort of "handshake" image a thousand times.  It is overused and carries no meaning - which I think defeats the purpose of an image in a slide.
  • An audience can’t listen to your presentation and read detailed, text-heavy slides at the same time (not without missing key parts of your message, anyway
    • vmcgee
       
      This is probably the topic that has had the greatest effect on my presentations so far.  I have done about 3 different presentations since this course began, and I am now always concentrating on not having my students read slide material while I talk.
  • Very few audiences enjoy paragraph-length bullet points.
    • dougmay
       
      I can't think of anybody, let alone a few people.
  • It’s okay to cover details verbally that are not reflected in your bullet points.
    • dougmay
       
      I am having a hard time adjusting to this thought. In the past, I wanted to include everything in the slides. Now I thinking of it more of an outline for me.
  • & contains watermark
  • & contains watermark
  • & contains watermark
  • & contains watermark
  • ) Image is of poor quality & contains watermark
  • This introduces distracting visual noi
    • dougmay
       
      Why would anyone do this? How could they think that this is ok?
1More

Teacher Seeds - 0 views

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    lots of Microsoft related links for backgrounds, sounds, games, animation, etc.
67More

Articles: Design - 2 views

    • nettiemarie
       
      great idea toremember
  • Use the same font set throughout your entire slide presentation
    • nettiemarie
       
      wow this is important to remember ....makes sense
    • pattyharris123
       
      I've been terrible about using the same font throughout. I always went for either cutesy for attention or used something out of the ordinary for emphasis. It really does make sense to keep the font all the same.
  • ...35 more annotations...
  • consistent visual theme throughout
    • nettiemarie
       
      Agree!
  • ). Never simply stretch a small, low-resolution photo to make it fit your layout – doing so will degrade the resolution even further.Avoid using PowerPoint Clip Art or other cartoonish
  • line art. Again, if it is included in the software, your audience has seen it a million times before. It may have been interesting in 1993, but today the inclusion of such clip art often
  • “chart junk
    • nettiemarie
       
      love this term... keep it simple only put on the slide what is needed get rid of the "junk"
  • Unity. Slides with
  • visual unity
    • nettiemarie
       
      Principal of design.... keep this throughout
  • convert each bullet point into a separate image
    • nettiemarie
       
      what an interesting idea... gives the audience a visual and that will stick with them better then reading text
  • The slides themselves were never meant to be the “star of the show”
    • Chanda Hassett
       
      So true but how often forgotten. If your slides can speak for themselves, why are you even there to present them? (a question I often posed to my students in hope they'd speak more off the slides than read them)
  • Background image has too much salience (text hard to see)
    • Chanda Hassett
       
      This is such an easy fix. A good eye will catch this artful contrast. Creating a good PowerPoint is truly an art. Using stock themes and clip art images is cliche, as stated, and truly detracts from the message.
  • People should be able to comprehend each one in about three seconds.
    • Chanda Hassett
       
      This is a good rule of thumb to try to embrace. The image should strike the emotion of the audience.
  • including a healthy amount of white space sharpens viewers’ focus by isolating elements
    • Chanda Hassett
       
      Too often avoided, white space does help to focus the eye. Again, a well planned presentation would recognize this element of design.
  • there’s beauty and clarity in restraint
    • Chanda Hassett
       
      It goes back to simplicity - Keep it Simple - Make your message known through the visual imagery and not the extraneous list of bulleted information.
  • If you use more than two lines anywhere, then they’re definitely leaning text heavy.
    • Chanda Hassett
       
      Another good rule of thumb I tend to make my bullets just ideas and never complete sentences, but sometimes they do get a little wordy.
    • pattyharris123
       
      Mine are brief lines, but also way too many per slide.
  • Re-write the highlighted phrases if they are inconsistent with the other simplified bullet points.
    • Chanda Hassett
       
      Great technique to pare down extra words to just what's necessary. An easy technique to share with students also.
    • pattyharris123
       
      Great note-taking tip!
  • This approach
    • Chanda Hassett
       
      Again, another great idea to limit the text and emphasize the image
    • pattyharris123
       
      This is a great idea as long as you don't overload on the slides.
  • boring an audience with bullet point after bullet point is of little benefit to them
    • pattyharris123
       
      when we have too many bullets, the audience focuses on them and not on us
  • prepare a written document which highlights your content from the presentation and expands on that content
    • pattyharris123
       
      expand your verbal information while keeping the number of slides to a minimum
  • Use high-quality graphics including photographs
    • pattyharris123
       
      Photographs will invoke much more emotion than animations
  • Have a visual theme, but avoid using PowerPoint templates
    • pattyharris123
       
      Don't use templates. Come up with your own visual theme!
  • Color evokes feelings. Color is emotional. The right color can help persuade and motivate.
    • pattyharris123
       
      So, use color! Grab your audience!
  • Use the same font set throughout your entire slide presentation
    • pattyharris123
       
      Use the same font - or at least a minimum of two.
  • people comprehend better when information is presented in small chunks or segments
    • pattyharris123
       
      Don't overload your audience all at once. Present in smaller chunks of information.
  • so that your audience isn’t staring at a wall of text
    • pattyharris123
       
      When giving too much on a slide, you will shut down your audience.
  • the star, of course, is your audience)
    • apresler
       
      Keep audience in mind!!!! They are the reason for the presentation. 
  • The less clutter you have on your slide, the more powerful your visual message will become.
    • apresler
       
      Keep it simple - let the message shine through. 
  • if you plan to keep most of the lights on (which is highly advisable) then a white background with black or dark text works much better.
    • apresler
       
      Good for classrooms
  • By getting out of the Slide View and into the Slide Sorter view, you can see how the logical flow of your presentation is progressing.
    • apresler
       
      Be sure to check and see if the big idea is getting across to the audience. 
  • your audience should focus intently on what you’re saying, looking only briefly at your slides when you display them.
    • apresler
       
      Similar to a billboard Three second rule
  • have plenty of “white space” or “negative space.” Do not feel compelled to fill empty areas
    • meyerlaura
       
      makes it way too 'busy'
  • Some animation is a good thing, but stick to the most subtle and professional
    • meyerlaura
       
      back to "simplify"
  • choose fonts deliberately.
    • meyerlaura
       
      I have to choose fonts in class that show the accents and punctuation best and clearest.  That is not Arial, even though I like Arial for most of my correspondence.  I've found that Comic Sans actually works best for me.  I know, it was 'dissed' in one of the articles, but it does work well for me!
  •  
    Use the same font throughout
63More

Articles: Design - 2 views

  • The less clutter you have on your slide, the more powerful your visual message will become.
    • merle64
       
      This is a huge takeaway for me--less is truly more. But the "less" needs to be thoughtful, not just less.
  • According to the Segmentation Principle of multimedia learning theory, people comprehend better when information is presented in small chunks or segments.
    • merle64
       
      I wonder if this applies to young children, too, in terms of showing a few slides, then breaking for an activity or application, then returning to a few additional slides?
  • Again, nothing should look accidental. This looks like they were going for the full-bleed background image effect but just missed. Now the software background template can be seen just enough to become a bit of noise
    • merle64
       
      This may look like many of my slides.  I considered that the "border" rather than "noise"--which is a bit like using a scrapbooking model rather than a presentation model.
    • nathanjenkins
       
      Yes, the border would seem to help.  Is there a way to fit to screen?  Is there a tool for this technique?  It often seems to be an issue for me.  
  • ...27 more annotations...
  • So make sure your slides pass what I call the glance test: People should be able to comprehend each one in about three seconds.
    • merle64
       
      This glance test matches with the elevator test taught earlier.  If the presenter is able to pass the elevator test in terms of clarity, the audience should be able to pass the glance test with the slides.
  • If sharing this approach prevents just one audience from suffering through another bullet-point-intensive, “death by PowerPoint” session, my efforts were not in vain.
    • merle64
       
      What a concrete, do-able approach to editing slide text down to the bare bones, or even replacing text entirely with visuals.  
  • Make sure you know the difference between a Serif font (e.g., Times New Roman) and a Sans-Serif font (Helvetica or Arial).
    • marydirksen
       
      I am so glad to have this explained! I did not know the difference between Serif and Sans-Serif.
  • f you have a detailed handout or publication for the audience to be passed out after your talk, you need not feel compelled to fill your PowerPoint slides with a great deal of text.
    • marydirksen
       
      Thanks to Zen Presentations, I did this very thing today at a faculty inservice. The atmosphere was light and fun and simple and I gave them a one page handout that was full of bullets. Thank you Zen!
    • nathanjenkins
       
      I am excited about changing my presentations and eliminating the wordiness.  I am a true believer in putting more work into the hands of the students, and they will hopefully become more in-tuned with the material.  
  • “white space”
    • marydirksen
       
      I like the repeated emphasis on white space. It has a very clear look.
  • Think of your slides as billboards.
    • marydirksen
       
      This comparison presents a strategy that will be very easy to remember.
  • Avoid off-the-shelf clip art
    • marydirksen
       
      Thank you for this strategy. Clip Art tends to cheapen the message.
  • Some animation is a good thing, but stick to the most subtle and professional
    • nathanjenkins
       
      I have been to many presentations where animation on the slides took over (often during technology meetings).  The only thing it said was that the tech guy knows his programs.  It was often distracting and limited the true expression of the material.
  • Similarly, your audience should focus intently on what you’re saying, looking only briefly at your slides when you display them
    • nathanjenkins
       
      I absolutely agree, but when the presentation is posted on a large screen in the front of the class it will be difficult to not have the students stare at the screen the entire time.  This kind of seems contradictory.  If we are trying to make catchy and interesting slides, why are we also only wanting them to take a brief glance?
  • Use the same font set throughout your entire slide presentation
  • You can use video clips within PowerPoint without ever leaving the application or tuning on a VCR. Using a video clip not only will illustrate your point better, it will also serve as a change of pace thereby increasing the interest of your audience. You can use audio clips (such as interviews) as well.
    • medidiigo
       
      I have never tried to use video or sound bites in my presentations. I would like to figure out how to do this
    • tvalline
       
      I also believe incorporating video clips into my presentations will help keep the attention of the audience, as well as, add interest and hopefully deepen understanding.
  • Even worse is to take a free comp from a photo website and stretch it out. This introduces distracting visual noise (and says you are either cheap, lazy, or both). If you cannot afford images (or do not have a camera, etc.), then it's better to use none at all
    • medidiigo
       
      This author "makes no bones about it" when expressing his opinions. His adjectives are a bit harsh..here, and elsewhere....but point taken.
  • Sometimes the image is actually a pretty good one but it just needs a bit of editing so that the text will pop out more. The slide on the left below is not horrible but the balance is off and the text does not pop out as much as it could. For the slide on the right below, the image is cropped for better balance, giving more space for the text to breath (and a transparent box is added to help the text pop out a bit more, though there are other ways to do this).
    • medidiigo
       
      I have been experimenting with creating a transparent box to help the text show up when there is a picture with background that interferes. I am still not happy with the effect that I got. I'm thinking there is probably a better way.
    • tvalline
       
      I would also like to perfect this technique.  I agree that it helps the text stand out much better.
  • White space is the open space surrounding items of interest. Presenters are often tempted to fill it up with additional content that competes for attention. But including a healthy amount of white space sharpens viewers’ focus by isolating elements. In this example, if we’d paired the text with a larger or more detailed image, your eye wouldn’t know where to begin, and the quote would have lost its power:
    • medidiigo
       
      Here, I'm wondering why they didn't enlarget he picture to cover the full screen as suggested earlier, and put that transparent box behind the text. Maybe they tried that and preferred this look. I find myself trying different things versions of my slides now as I am working on my current presentation project.
  • Presentation software gives us many shiny, seductive elements to work with. But there’s beauty and clarity in restraint. Use simple visuals that support your message, and you’ll free people up to really hear — and adopt — your ideas.
    • medidiigo
       
      This is well stated. It's a good point to take from the article and remember as I create my presentations.
  • It can be challenging to reduce and simplify
    • medidiigo
       
      True. More so than I thought it would be
  • Follow these steps to reduce and simplify your text-heavy bullet points — your audience will thank you. Live long and prosper.
    • medidiigo
       
      This is a good strategy for recreating old text-heavy PowerPoint presentations that need a fresh look.
  • (the star, of course, is your audience)
    • Joe Brekke
       
      Fantastic reminder. 
  • “negative space.”
    • Joe Brekke
       
      My architect friends always talk about this as well. 
  • The best slides may have no text at all.
    • Joe Brekke
       
      Let me transcribe that for myself so I remember: "The best slides have no text at all." Got it. 
  • Try to avoid cheesy clip art like this.
    • Joe Brekke
       
      Why do they still make this stuff and offer it? 
  • decrease the opacity and add a Gaussian Blur or motion filter in Photoshop
    • Joe Brekke
       
      I'm adding this suggestion to the tool belt. 
  • Image is lame & has nothing to do with contentNot sure what two guys shaking hands in front of a globe has to do with the fertility rate in Japan. Yet even if we were talking about "international partnership" the image is still a cliché.
    • Joe Brekke
       
      This just made me laugh out loud :-) 
  • People should be able to comprehend each one in about three seconds.
    • Joe Brekke
       
      Here's another easy-to-remember tip to pass on to my students. 
  • Use high-quality graphics including photographs
    • tvalline
       
      Guilty.  I'm looking forward to working through my various presentations replacing my plethora of cartoon graphics with emotion-provoking photographs.
  • Audiences are much better served receiving a detailed, written handout as a takeaway from the presentation, rather than a mere copy of your PowerPoint slides
    • tvalline
       
      I found this interesting.  I often wish I could just take the power point handout and be on my way since many times the presenter just reads the slides to the audience.  I can read.
  • Remove all extraneous copy from bullet points
    • tvalline
       
      This is where I falter.  It's hard to simplify information to just one or two words, even though it is often more effective.  I will be working on this.
67More

Articles: Design - 0 views

  • You can then save the PowerPoint file as a Design Template (.pot) and the new template will appear among your standard Microsoft templates for your future use. You can also purchase professional templates on-line (for example:
    • leahjmiller
       
      Awesome!  I didn't know that you could do this.
    • cherylfletcher
       
      Good to know.
  • Colors can be divided into two general categories: Cool (such as blue and green) and Warm (such as orange and red). Cool colors work best for backgrounds as they appear to recede away from us into the background. Warm colors generally work best for objects in the foreground (such as text) because they appear to be coming at us.
    • leahjmiller
       
      I often don't think in terms of the cool/warm colors but just try to pick colors that go together.  Now I will be more mindful.
  • Lots of extras actually take away meaning because they become a distraction.
    • leahjmiller
       
      Throughout the course readings, I've come to really understand this.  The great examples speak for themselves.
  • ...32 more annotations...
  • Do any slides feel text heavy? Be honest with yourself.
    • leahjmiller
       
      I realize that my slides have been very text heavy in the past.  Now it is easy to think, duh, why put all the text on the slide, if I'm going to be sharing the information with my audience anyways.
  • This happens when you take a low-rez jpeg (from a website, for example) and stretch it out.
    • leahjmiller
       
      This is very frustrating to me.  I've experienced this many times and I often end up picking a different picture.
    • cherylfletcher
       
      This is a hard topic to explain to people. I have worked with staff for many years explaining bigger is better. You can always make it smaller and be ok but the oppposite is not true.
  • People should be able to comprehend each one in about three seconds
    • dahrens20
       
      Being a business teacher I'm seeing a lot of similar traits to building resumes and app letters...the effectiveness of white space and as  mentioned here the eye test.
  • A clear visual hierarchy allows viewers to quickly ascertain a slide’s most important elements:
    • dahrens20
       
      These slides are really hitting home with me with the larger font on the statistic. I'm realizing now that I haven't utilized statistics this way in the past in my presentations and will change that going forward!
    • berlandson
       
      I also find myself trying to be "consistent" so I don't vary the font size.  This illustrates how important it is to emphasize the important!
  • The arrow comes in later to underscore the point: Our future looks good!
    • dahrens20
       
      I've never seen a chart with the added emphasized arrow...I like it!  It definitely grabs your attention right away!
  • you hate bullet points
    • dahrens20
       
      I'm definitely agreeing with using as few as bullet points as possible after looking through all the articles and lessons in this class. You're making me think real hard how I'm going to approach my college computer class that I teach. Obviously we aren't in PPT very long compared to the other Microsoft applications but never have I discouraged using bullets...now you're making this hard on me!  : )  There will definitely be some itmes and ideas that I take from this class and learn it forward.
  • Try to bold only the key parts of each point — limit it to as few words as possible.
    • dahrens20
       
      Very simple but yet very productive!
    • pfineran
       
      I have done this far too often in the past and also been in presentations that used too many bullets. I'm very excited to learn how to avoid this pitfall.
    • pfineran
       
      When I first learned how to work with PPT, I thought animations and fades and such were a plus. Now I realize they get a little distracting.
    • pfineran
       
      This a great rule of thumb to go by!
    • pfineran
       
      As someone who is very visual in the way I process information, I can see that this second example would be what I would prefer. It's simple and it's a lot less to take in.
    • pfineran
       
      I thought too much white space was a bad thing. Here it actually works to make the image/text stand out. I always thought there had to be strict balance.
  • if it is included in the software, your audience has seen it a million times before
    • kluttenegger
       
      This seems so incredibly obvious, yet I have never considered it. The same clip art is being reused through the world and many presenters are probably unaware.  With high schoolers at least, I think overly cheesy or old graphics are a quick way to lose both credibility and engagement.
    • berlandson
       
      In my personal finance class I have always used the company slides with my changes.  I was worried most about content and then last year one of my students asked if I had considered using a different template for each unit (it was stated in a kind way, just wondering way) and it made me see the need for change.  Last year I just changed templates....which they liked.  I wish they could see the changes this class is bringing for me!
  • Use appropriate charts
    • kluttenegger
       
      The power of these charts lies in their simplicity. When we usually see charts in PD or staff meetings they are cram too much information into one slide. While I'm very unfamiliar with creating charts, I think well-designed and visually simple ones could enhance several of my presentations.
  • contains watermark
    • kluttenegger
       
      I'm not sure there is a quicker way to advertise that your selection of images is lazy than to have a gigantic watermark plastered on a screen.  Students also need to be reminded how poorly this can reflect on a presenter.
  • Think of your slides as billboards
    • kluttenegger
       
      This combined with the three second rule mentioned above are helpful tips, but also very practical. You don't need a degree in design to consider how quickly your slide can be comprehended.  I've never considered how quickly people give up on a slide that is confusing, but we all do it.
    • cherylfletcher
       
      Great concept. We only put important information on a billboard and that should follow suit on presentation.
  • Follow these steps to reduce and simplify your text-heavy bullet points
    • kluttenegger
       
      I was getting a bit frustrated at being told why so many slides are crap but not having enough practical advice to prevent it. This list of steps is incredibly helpful. I can't wait to try and simplify some of my presentations, though I'm scared how long it may take for such a text heavy person like myself!
  • Image is stretched vertically & distorted
    • berlandson
       
      This is a #1 "bad presentation" thing for students!  Sometimes I think they think they are at the mercy of the software and decide "I can't do anything about the strange picture"!  Distorted images draw the audience to the image rather than the message!
  • And this is even better…
    • berlandson
       
      This really proves "a picture is worth 1000 words"..the slide started out so wordy and see it move to one "word" is impressive!
  • Remove all extraneous copy from bullet points
    • berlandson
       
      Love this advice.  Hard for teachers to walk away from "the list", but this advice improves "the list"!
  • Your slides should have plenty of “white space” or “negative space.” Do not feel compelled to fill empty areas on your slide with your logo or other unnecessary graphics or text boxes that do not contribute to better understanding. The less clutter you have on your slide, the more powerful your visual message will become.
    • gsmutz
       
      Before this class, I had never thought about how important the white space was.  I am looking forward to making my powerpoint effective by using the white space to my advantage.
    • cherylfletcher
       
      White space - guess I always thought it looked blank and needed to be filled. I will have to practice this one.
  • If the photographic image is the primary area I want the audience to notice (such as a picture of a product), then the image can be more pronounced and little (or no) text is needed.
    • gsmutz
       
      I like how this idea was explained.  If the picture is the focal point, make it stand out!  If the text is the focal point, blur the picture and the text will draw the eye first.
  • Spend time in the slide sorter
  • Spend time in the slide sorter
  • Spend time in the slide sorter
    • gsmutz
       
      I don't think I have ever used this screen on powerpoint.  This will be beneficial to make sure my slides have a consistent theme and that they flow nicely.
    • cherylfletcher
       
      I remember when I have worked with staff who do not use powerpoint very much how excited they were to see the slide sorter. Some of them had deleted slides in the past because they were in the wrong order. OH MY!
  • Can you just send me your PowerPoint slides?” But if they are good slides, they will be of little use without you
    • cherylfletcher
       
      This happens at a lot of the conferences I attend. I get the documents with links and things but the actual presentation? It should NOT be any good without the speaker.
  • Use high-quality graphics including photographs.
    • cherylfletcher
       
      The AEA provides great clip art and real photography. I push it to my staff but I feel they use the google images way to much and they are not always appropriate.
  • Unity. Slides with visual unity look as though the same person created them and make your message feel cohesive. You can achieve this through consistent type styles, color, image treatment, and element placement throughout the slide deck. Here’s a pair of slides to illustrate:
    • gsmutz
       
      I like how this looks.  How do you find images that you can do this with (put on any color screen)?  I also notice how each image is placed in line with the other images.
  • Step 4b: Replace bullet points with images
  • Step 4b: Replace bullet points with images
    • gsmutz
       
      This is a good way to get more pictures and less text.  It would also be easy to present on, given the pictures that you were showing.  I am assuming you show the whole slide at once, and not get one picture animated after another.
  • Step 4b: Replace bullet points with images
  • informed
92More

Articles: Design - 0 views

  • The less clutter you have on your slide, the more powerful your visual message will become.
    • stac34
       
      As a person who likes clean lines and simplicity, I apprecaite this statement. I think less can definitely be more!
    • brendahack
       
      It seems to be proven over and over when we see examples of noise and clear slides.
  • By getting out of the Slide View and into the Slide Sorter view, you can see how the logical flow of your presentation is progressing.
    • stac34
       
      This is a great place to proofread and edit to ensure that the presenatation flows and keeps a common theme throughout. I think that it would be easy to spot slides that need some work when looking at all of them at once.
  • Presenter tiles image
  • ...48 more annotations...
  • 8) Presenter tiles image
  • Presenter tiles image
    • stac34
       
      Do people seriously do this??
  • People should be able to comprehend each one in about three seconds.
    • stac34
       
      This is a good rule of thumb, I think that is why the visual on the page is so important to help quickly understand the content.
    • jsoland
       
      I really like this as well. I have such a difficult time figuring out what text to include. This will definitely help me to minimize and focus on what's really important.
  • What key part of each bullet point do you need to mention during your PowerPoint presentation?
    • stac34
       
      This is a good point when thinking about trying to get closer to the "six words per slide" rule. Keeping in mind the key details can help decrease the use of words that are not needed.
  • convert each bullet point into a separate image
    • stac34
       
      Great idea! After deciding the important details on a slide, rather than just including those find a visual that represents what the bullet points would have siad. The presenter will still have to explain what the visuals mean, but that should happen anyway, much bettter than sentences next to bullet points!
    • brendahack
       
      I like this, but also wonder if it is too noisey. Do you think it could be divided into several slides of reasons, or does that become too many slides?
  • Avoid using PowerPoint Clip Art or other cartoonish line art.
    • KIM BYRD
       
      I have been a sucker over the years to use generic clipart. I thought this was something we could do. Now I know we need to use human images to bring more personal aspects to the presentation.
    • brendahack
       
      :) You are not alone on this one.
  • No audience will be excited about a cookie-cutter presentation
    • KIM BYRD
       
      I absolutely thought using templates were what you were supposed to do. Ooops.
  • Make sure you know the difference between a Serif font (e.g., Times New Roman) and a Sans-Serif font (Helvetica or Arial
    • KIM BYRD
       
      When creating a presentation, so not mix these fonts. The articles stated to stay with Helvetia and Arial with only two colors per slide.
  • Text within images is but one way to use text/data and images harmoniously
    • KIM BYRD
       
      I look forward to trying this out and adding gradian to the picture.
  • Presenters are often tempted to fill it up with additional content that competes for attention
    • KIM BYRD
       
      If I had a photo that contained white space on the edges, I usually put a border around it. I did not realize we were to keep the white space open in order to create "open space" needed in a presentation.
  • “Sorry I missed your presentation. I hear it was great. Can you just send me your PowerPoint slides?” But if they are good slides, they will be of little use without you. Instead of a copy of your PowerPoint slides, it is far better to prepare a written document which highlights your content from the presentation and expands on that content.
    • jsoland
       
      I'm embarassed to admit this, but it had never occured to me to prepare a handout other than a copy of the slides until this course.
  • Clip art is chosen
  • Clip art is chosen
  • Avoid off-the-shelf clip art
    • jsoland
       
      So, this example is pretty extreme in how bad it is, but I'm really starting to dislike anything clipart. It seems it is never appropriate.
    • candace berkley
       
      Wow. This anecdote makes the point very clear: The presentation is to aid the presenter, not replace the presenter.
  • Have a visual theme
    • candace berkley
       
      I get this concept: Theme is established through consistent choices in color, font, placement, images and not through templates.
  • Use color well
    • sarahjmoore
       
      Another issue I have seen with color is the projector. I have seen a lot of pretty presentations that were turned horrible by the projector. My principle was trying to promote some school spirit and had his slide in school colors (purple background and yellow text). Purple backgrounds were turned pure black when projected. It looked ok, but the point was completely missed. I think it is important to keep it simple and test it out if I can before I give it to help prevent that issue. 
  • cheesy sound effects
    • sarahjmoore
       
      This makes me think of my dear education professor in college. He was 70 something and loved teaching. He tried so hard to keep up with the times, and he must have had someone show him the audio buttons because every slide in his presentations would have a different sound effect. It wasn't really engaging, just annoying. But, we all knew how hard he worked and that he truly loved teaching. 
  • entire presentation
    • sarahjmoore
       
      This view will also be more effective without all of the bullets and large chunks of text. 
  • es the image is actually a pretty good one but it just needs a bit of editing so that the text will pop out more.
    • sarahjmoore
       
      This is one of the biggest struggles I have will use full background images. The text doesn't pop like I want it to. I like the idea of adding in the transparent box. 
  • add one relevant image to the slide
    • sarahjmoore
       
      This is where I feel I get stuck. I want them to be more engaging then this, but I also don't want to have simply concept pictures. 
  • with images
    • sarahjmoore
       
      I think this would be really effective if you reveal them as you talk about them creating that flow of content. I know when I first looked at this slide I started to try and understand the meaning of each photo. I would have to force myself as an audience member to wait for the presenter to explain them. 
  • The slides themselves were never meant to be the “star of the show” (the star, of course, is your audience).
    • brendahack
       
      Good to keep in mind. It is not about you or the images you choose, or the words we use. It is about the audience and having them on the journey with us.
  • If you have a detailed handout or publication for the audience to be passed out after your talk, you need not feel compelled to fill your PowerPoint slides with a great deal of text
    • brendahack
       
      I am excited to present with this point in mind. I know it will be different, but I think it will be a good different.
  • Some animation is a good thing, but stick to the most subtle and professional (similar to what you might see on the evening TV news broadcast).
    • brendahack
       
      I am still thinking about this. How much is too much? This statement of what you might see on the evening news is helpful. I do think some animation, like fade, does make it flow and perhaps more interesting, but you can definately have too much of a good thing.
  • Pretend as though you are an audience member for your upcoming presentation. Do any slides feel text heavy? Be honest with yourself. Remember the golden rule of PowerPoint presentations — always do what is right for your audience. Very few audiences enjoy paragraph-length bullet points.
    • brendahack
       
      I have certainly been gulity of this. How small can I make the font to get it all to fit on one slide. Find the main message and clear away the rest.
  • Think of your slides as billboards. When people drive, they only briefly take their eyes off their main focus — the road — to process billboard information. Similarly, your audience should focus intently on what you’re saying, looking only briefly at your slides when you display them.
    • brendahack
       
      Keep it simple. Over and over, probably the most powerful message throughout. I really think they made the point with the bill board analogy.
    • aneppl
       
      Very good point. On Wednesday when I presented I had a very minimal powerpoint, 12 total slides for the hour. But I was talking, sharing stories, had humor, and had plenty of table discussions. Slowly I can get better at this
  • Here, for example, your eye takes in the cluster of grapes, then moves to the message about quality, and then focuses on one beautiful grape from the “yield”:
    • brendahack
       
      Great example. Rather like painting. You want to have the eye move from one spot to the other, dicovering your message as they go. Nice!
  • So when adding elements to your slides, have a good reason:
    • jsoland
       
      I think this is important for images as well as text. I need to keep in mind that sometimes just having the words on a slide can be as powerful as an image.
  • It’s functioning like a teleprompter
    • jsoland
       
      We always need to keep in mind that the presentation and slides are for the audience, not the presenter. If we need a teleprompter than we don't know the material enough to be presenting.
  • you’re just reading the slides to your audience. Boring.
    • aneppl
       
      I'm learning slowly. This morning in a presentation, I still had one slide that was heavy in text. For a split second I almost starting reading, but then I paused and let staff read it to themselves. Then we went on. I survived.
  • In some cases, the bullet points may not be conducive to matching visuals
  • In some cases, the bullet points may not be conducive to matching visual
  • In some cases, the bullet points may not be conducive to matching visuals
  • In some cases, the bullet points may not be conducive to matching visuals
    • aneppl
       
      Do you need the bulleted list at all in the below slide? The magazine cover would serve as the reminder to both the presenter and audience on the main topics. 
  • your logo
    • aneppl
       
      For several years our district required us to use "approved" powerpoint templates. At first I thought they were kind of cool, I was proud of the district for being so professional right! But as I developed more and more presentations, it was sometimes hard to fit all the text on the slides I wanted. Well...now I know better, both the templates and the extensive text are not appropriate. We pretty much use google presentations now so I need to learn more about using blank templates within google. 
  • If the photographic image is secondary in importance, then I decrease the opacity and add a Gaussian Blur or motion filter in Photoshop
    • aneppl
       
      It totally understand this and given my art and computer background I know I could do this. However, I am a long way from seeming to have time to do this when some of our presentations are literally being built leading right up to the presentation...Planning is key
  • You can give a good presentation without any images at all, but if you do use images in slides, try to keep these eleven tips in mind.
    • aneppl
       
      So if there are times where it might be ok to use clip art, would it be recommended to use clip art throughout the presentation rather than switching between photos/images and clipart?
    • aneppl
       
      Not that I want to use any clip art...
  • Similarly, your audience should focus intently on what you’re saying, looking only briefly at your slides when you display them.
  • Similarly, your audience should focus intently on what you’re saying, looking only briefly at your slides when you display them
  • Similarly, your audience should focus intently on what you’re saying, looking only briefly at your slides when you display them
  • Photos should be taken by the same photographer or look as if they are. Illustrations should be done in the same style.
    • aneppl
       
      This kind of answers my question from the end of the previous article...consistency is good. 
  • White space is the open space surrounding items of interest
    • aneppl
       
      The white space was one of the things I liked about using Prezi.
  • Aim for something like this simple slide above.
  • But if you plan to keep most of the lights on (which is highly advisable) then a white background with black or dark text works much better. In rooms with a good deal of ambient light, a screen image with a dark background and light text tends to washout, but dark text on a light background will maintain its visual intensity a bit better.Learn more:
    • candace berkley
       
      I have never considered the amount of light in the room and how that might affect the presentation. I will have to experiment with lights on and lights off to see if I can detect any difference.
    • candace berkley
       
      really like the simplicity of this slide and how powerful that percentage becomes by enlarging the font and minimizing the amount of words.
    • candace berkley
       
      How many times have I seen students use the same old graphics in presentations? I need to direct them to other sources, such as some of the ones available through Heartland. How do you help them find unique graphics (or not to be satisfied with using the same graphics as everyone else)?
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Implementation in a Secondary Classroom (Articles) - 0 views

  • “We have all these different methods of how kids can present the project, for example, through Photo Story, xtra normal (an animation site where kids create their own animations), PowerPoints, vodcasts, podcasts.
    • kelsi-johnson
       
      My biggest struggle with this is the lack of technology knowledge that my students possess. This type of learning would definitely have to begin and be supported at lower levels of education in order to find success at the secondary level. My students know how to use technology for social means but have very little experience with academic applications and websites. We struggle with giving them individual learning opportunities because of the excessive amount of time we have to spend explaining how to use these resources rather than actually applying/demonstrating their learning.
    • anonymous
       
      I agree with your comment completely. I would love to give individuals the opportunity to create their final project in multiple formats. Unfortunately, it requires both them and me to be well versed on each of the options. The individuals I teach are so afraid to hit the wrong button, time constraints and lack of experience play a huge role as to what I can offer for options within the classroom.
  • For example, when a teacher assigns a research project, some students will prefer to have a broad range of topics, others will prefer a small list of options, and yet others will prefer to be told what to do. Giving students a short list of topics with an option to create their own topic, with the teacher’s approval, often works well.
    • kelsi-johnson
       
      I definitely find this to be true in my own classroom. I have some students who can come up with great, original applications and products to demonstrate their learning. However, I have others who would simply choose to do nothing or throw a project together last minute if it is not clearly laid out for them. I want to strive to be better about fostering a sense of independence in my students' learning and not simply spoon-feed them all of the information that they need. Ultimately, this is going to allow them to be the most successful after leaving school. Now, I just need to figure out the best way to do that!
  • Some students chose to remain at their desks, others crawled under the desks, and still others found comfortable places elsewhere.
    • kelsi-johnson
       
      I give my students this choice at all times; I have tables, chairs, bean bags, a couch, and two cushioned chairs in my classroom. I don't care if students sit at these locations or even on the floor (though under a desk may not be the best choice!) as long as they are working productively. Most classes want to continue to have this privilege, so they are typically very respectful of our classroom-established norms for behavior.
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  • Once teachers have planned their methods and strategies, they can fit their work into a timeline. Because the design is flexible and students are responsible for taking charge of their own learning, coverage of the content is ensured and depth of understanding is achieved
    • kelsi-johnson
       
      I would like to see an example of such a timeline for a secondary English classroom. I understand the concept but would love to see it in full application to gauge how I can make this work in my own classroom. It seems like a good idea to also have students keep some sort of reflective journal tracking their progress as well. This can be beneficial for the student and the teacher in guiding/creating future tasks.