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juliefulton

"Personalized" vs. "Personal" Learning - 36 views

  • Tocqueville’s observations
  • A suffix can change everything
    • lisalillian311
       
      Harsh adverb.  Not all students analyze "ideas from the inside out".  I think that is something that personalized learning can teach them.
  • ‘We often say we want creativity and innovation – personalization – but every mechanism we use to measure it is through control and compliance.’
    • principalchris
       
      This is a topic that has been discussed for years - But how do I grade the project??  I am glad I do not receive a grade for being the principal!
  • ...75 more annotations...
  • If we can’t engage our kids in ideas and explorations that require no technology, then we have surely lost our way.
  • One final caveat: in the best student-centered, project-based education, kids spend much of their time learning with and from one another. Thus, while making sense of ideas is surely personal, it is not exclusively individual because it involves collaboration and takes place in a community. Even proponents of personal learning may sometimes forget that fact, but it’s a fact that was never learned by supporters of personalized learning.
    • principalchris
       
      I like the fact that Alfie Kohn makes the reader think.  He is a word smith and must love kids!
  • She cautions educators who may be excited about the progressive educational implications for “personalized learning” to make sure everyone they work with is on the same page about what that phrase means.
    • madonna63
       
      Educational Admin. needs to work with schools to come up with other forms of assessment that meet up with individualized forms of learning. 
    • marydermit
       
      Yes, new forms of assessment will be needed with PL.  I think this maybe a challenge because standardized tests are tied to funding.  I am afraid standardized tests are here to stay until funding changes are made at the state /federal level.
    • ahawthorne
       
      This is always an issue. Making sure everyone is on the same page.
    • lisalillian311
       
      I think my original comment about change being difficult for veteran teachers was deleted (accidentally by me).  Part of my statement mentioned the need for PD on PL.
    • nwhipple
       
      I agree that everyone needs to be on the same page.  Too many times we get bombarded in PD sessions and walk away with mixed emotions and different understandings about what we learned about.  PL needs to be a clear, cut definition amongst everyone in the building.  It wouldn't be a bad idea to have PD on PL.  Veteran teachers absolutely need to be up to date on reaching all learners and stepping themselves out of their comfort zones to help reach every student's needs individually, not in a whole group setting.  
    • dwefel
       
      This will be a big challenge getting everyone on board.
    • kainley
       
      I agree that it would be a challenge to get everyone on the same page. I like the idea of PD, but how do we get our administrators to "buy in"? Then after that, how do you get people who are set in their way, especially if it is improving test scores, to change their thinking so we are focused on the whole child?
    • kburrington
       
      I guess I would like to go back a step and look at how college educational departments are teaching Personal Learning. I would say most teachers are teaching the way they were taught. Maybe the change needs to start there also.
    • katie50009
       
      As a district we tried to define creativity during PD incorporating the 4C's. It was no easy task. It is even more difficult to measure!
    • juliefulton
       
      It seems as though we need a multi-phase approach at infusing PL in our educational systems. I agree with needing PD for our current teachers and that colleges need to be modeling PL for our new teachers. We also need to inspire our students to be individual thinkers rather than the 'check mark the box' learners that our system currently promotes.
  • best thing we can do for kids is empower them
  • he demands of the system — and education leaders’ desire to excel within it — lend themselves well to the computerized, modular and often very standardized system of “personalization” many ed-tech companies are offering.
    • marydermit
       
      This sounds like more of the same unless PL stakeholders and teachers are involved in the R&D.
    • katie50009
       
      When thinking about the constraints of our current system--Common Core, standards assessments, pacing guides, etc.--I wonder if PL will become anything more than a dream or a small scale implementation.
  • Personalized learning entails adjusting the difficulty level of prefabricated
  • Big questions, passion, personal interest are what should drive our use of technology, not the other way around.
  • “Personalized” learning is something that we do to kids; “personal” learning is something they do for themselves. In a world where we can explore almost every interest or passion in depth on our own or with others, it’s crucially more important to have the dispositions and the skills to create our own educational opportunities, not be trained to wait for opportunities that someone else has selected for delivery.
    • madonna63
       
      Educators will need to be informed on what it will look like for students to take these opportunities which won't be directed by us or possibly by curriculum. They will need to learn how to help students on this path and not hinder them.
    • marydermit
       
      PD is vital for teachers.  If left out it will not be good for anyone most of all the students.  
    • spfantz
       
      This definition is vague, I too would like to look at specific curriculum pathways and opportunities. Seeing personalized learning in action, and the role of the teacher would be interesting.
    • Alison Ruebel
       
      I now understand more the difference between "personalized" and "personal" learning, but I do agree that staff and administrators need to be more informed and given specific examples or experiences to help us learn more about implementing it and what our role is as a teacher. It would be nice to be given examples of this in action. It seems so confusing once you think about how teachers do this in the classroom, but I think it can make a big difference in schools and student learning in the future. 
    • Jessica Athen
       
      This quote really helped me to understand more of what we are learning about. 
    • alissahansen
       
      Agreed, this is a very helpful statement, but I think I would also agree that I would like to see what PL looks like. (Alissa Hansen)
    • bakersusan
       
      This is a very helpful statement, PD with time to implement is important for success. In addition to teachers being educated about PL, parents will also need to be educated. In my district as we have tried to incorporate more technology, unless the parents are in agreement, the changes have not been successful.
    • kaberding
       
      I have a better understanding of personalized learning vs. personal learning.  I like how the author states the difference; it makes it very easy to differentiate between the two terms.  In regards to the rest of the statement, I think that professional development is a vital key in getting teachers "on board" with this concept.  I have cotaught with many general education teachers, and it is difficult for some to see how this will work and what this can look like.  A bank of teachers "in action" would be great for all teachers to access to get ideas!  
    • kburrington
       
      I totally agree that there are a lot of people who would have to get on board. I now realize that I'm just providing personalized learning with my Odysseyware, not personal learning by any means.
  • moving ownership of learning away from the teacher and more toward the student.
    • madonna63
       
      Our current way of teaching is somewhat like a 'helicopter mother'. We aren't letting students try and fail on their own, without us being there to catch them. We need to be more of a teacher/resource person to instruct and /or guide when needed. Also, like a grandmother-giving positive feedback.
    • marydermit
       
      We do not teach students that failure is part of learning or the importance of what we can learn from a failed attempt. Sticky notes are a perfect example.
    • spfantz
       
      Some of the online programs such as Khan Academy and E2020 are the epitomy of nonpersonalized learning, yet we are enrolling more and more students each year.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      This is where students could/should be encouraged to seek out resources that fit their individual interests.  It is a step in the right direction, but needs to be applied in a way that will help students become stronger learners. 
    • ahawthorne
       
      I agree the online programs are just classroom lectures put on the computer and are more of the same. 
    • jroffman
       
      I think it is a great idea to have students be responsible or the "owner" of their own learning, we need to get parents and administration on board with this, I feel that way too often it is the teachers fault or the schools fault when kids are not learning. 
    • dwefel
       
      I have to admit, I am that 'helicopter mother' teacher sometimes. I agree, teachers need to find individual interests in students and figure out how they want to learn and step away and allow students to figure out how they learn best, even if they do fail at first.
  • It requires the presence of a caring teacher who knows each child well.
    • madonna63
       
      The idea of each student having a teacher(s) know her/him well is vital. We don't want students just being set free and only "check in" as they go along. They will feel very disconnected and alone. They need to be known, cared for. Teachers might have times during the year when she gets her students together to do activities to get to know each other, celebrate holidays, etc.
    • marydermit
       
      I like your idea of getting students together for a celebration It could be a celebration of learning to highlight student work / projects.  This fits into the PL model of "learn to learn, learn to do, learn to be." 
    • lisalillian311
       
      I wonder in an ideal PL environment what the student/teacher ratio should be?  Large classes are tough to get to know students in the way that PL suggests
    • nwhipple
       
      "Ah Ha".. every teacher who is there for their students should know their students well.  Not only how they learn, but about their family life and themselves personally.  Building a relationship with each child is huge.  I couldn't imagine walking into my room every morning and not wanting to connect with each student, individually and personally, daily.  If teachers aren't going to be caring and willing to get to know each of their students, then they shouldn't be allowed to have their minds to mold.  
    • jroffman
       
      Part of the requirement of the Voluntary 4 year old preschool program is that I go to each home before school starts and do a home visit. I love it, I think it is the best idea ever and I really think all elementary teachers should do it. I really think that I make a strong connection with all of my students by having them meet me in their home where they are in the most control. Even though I know each child very well I just feel like there is not enough of me to go around, there are always those one or two students that require more time and energy while the rest are kind of on their own.
    • alissahansen
       
      I think home visits are wonderful, although I am not sure my high school students would want Mrs. Hansen coming to their house! ha ha. I do make it a priority to keep the lines of communication open with families, in fact, I send out emails weekly (personal), make calls (5 a day, positive and negative), and even send out personal welcome letters at the start of the year. It makes quite the difference in how my students work for me! (Alissa Hansen)
  • echnology was strikingly absent from these conversations. Instead, the common view of personalization focused on giving agency for learning to the student and valuing each individual in a classroom.
    • spfantz
       
      The definitions we have read about personalized learning incorporate technology as an important piece of the personalized learning experience, so this surprises me.
    • Alison Ruebel
       
      Yes this surprised me too! A lot of my kids learn best through using technology since they are surrounded by it today within this generation, and engages them more so to me it makes sense to have technology be a big part of personalized learning. 
    • Lisa Hackman
       
      I agree! How can technology not be part of the personal learning environment? There are so many opportunities for students to use technology to reach out to others all over the world for collaboration. Technology doesn't have to be relegated only to ed-tech programs.
    • alissahansen
       
      I guess the idea behind the technology is to use it so students have the freedom to gather authentic and meaningful information to help them towards mastery, instead of using technology just for technology sake. A lot of us do, but I have definitely encountered classrooms that like the idea of having technology in the classroom, but it does nothing to further learning in students. (Alissa Hansen)
    • bakersusan
       
      I think with this statement, the author is trying to remind us that personalized learning is more than technology. You don't have to use technology to truly personalize learning for students but that it can be one of the "tools" in the teacher's toolbox to help students learn.
    • lisa noe
       
      I think that the author is implying that technology itself shouldn't be the teacher but more like a partner in learning. I personally think that too many times technology impedes learning.  Students don't have to think or try to figure something out, they can just Google the answer.  If all the answers in the universe can be found in Google what is the point of learning?  We need students to think of things that aren't out there yet.  To discover the unknown.  
  • specific curriculum that will be evaluated on standardized tests, while at the same time telling teachers to be innovative and creative within their classrooms
    • spfantz
       
      This sentence does appear to be a contradiction. Requiring teachers to teach a specific curriculum while infusing innovation and creativity is a challenge.
    • nwhipple
       
      I absolutely agree with you!  It is VERY hard to teach the specific standards for the test while wanting to be creative.  More projects take time and time is inevitable.  We need more time to make learning "fun" and "meet all the standards".  I find kindergarten to be a challenge to balance the standards and crafts/fun.  I know I tried hard this year to let the kids "play" at their tables during math and reading with manipulative instead of constantly doing pages from our math/reading books.  
    • emilyzelenovich
       
      Curiosity is something I really see lacking in some students today (at least high school students).  Many have a really hard time thinking of things they want to know or learn about or believe they can just get the answer to a question by looking online.  I have many students, who when given the chance to research a topic of their choice, believe they aren't interested in anything. This would be a challenge with peronalized learning. 
    • lisalillian311
       
      I agree: curiosity has to have motivation.  I allow students to choose their research topic, and once they delve into it, they start asking me questions, which, in turn, I help them find internet info that might send them in the right direction.  Then, they fly!
    • alissahansen
       
      Sadly, I too have seen more and more lack of innovation and creativity with students and the issue is on the rise it seems. I know with my own experiences as a high school English teacher that students really struggle coming up with their own original ideas, and even with lots of guidance and modeling beforehand. It's as if they do not trust themselves to make a good decision and this is so sad! I try to be very eclectic with how I teach the curriculum and my students will tell you that they do have a lot of choice and voice in my class, but they still need to meet standards and achieve mastery at some levels. I just don't know what it is that seems to be holding students back anymore. I do think PL can help this issue, but I do think that students will have difficulty (as with any chance) getting into such a different system if they already struggle being authentic, generating original ideas, and being creative. (Alissa Hansen)
    • Alison Ruebel
       
      This is very true in many schools. I can relate to this, since our school has been focused on following our new school's reading curriculum this year and focusing on test scores each week. It isn't allowing us to be creative in our classrooms. How do we change the views of administrators to help them allow us to have more personalized learning in our classrooms?
    • kainley
       
      I worry about adding personalized learning to our environment too. We have seen 20% growth in reading scores on Iowa Assessments as we switched our Tier One instruction to a new curriculum. I think our curriculum and the way that teachers are constantly looking at data and working together to create better ways to meet student needs (small group instruction, mixing up classes, intensive guided groups, etc.) has been successful. I wonder how personalized learning lends it self to standardized tests...although the voice of reason in the back of my mind keeps reminding me that one test on one day is no way to measure what a student knows...or for that matter who they are!
    • alissahansen
       
      We have seen a lot of growth with Iowa Assessments too, and it is a result of the amazing teachers in our building and the data teams. I do wonder what assessments look like in a PL environment. There has been a sharp focus on reading and math scores, and scores equate to funding, so I have a feeling that this would be a hard sell...sadly. How can the bureaucracy of the educational world come to terms with what learners truly need/want? I guess this is always up for debate, and once you add in the giving "students the freedom to follow a meaningful line of inquiry, while building the skills to connect, synthesize and analyze information into original productions," it tends to scare people.
    • alissahansen
       
      (last comment was from Alissa Hansen)
    • jenniferlb
       
      This is a true concern, as we have pre and post assessments for each unit to gauge their mastery of the standards.  While I find that information valuable, it is a struggle (and great concern) for many of my colleagues regarding the "freedom" to be creative in how they approach the standards.  I hope to better understand how the idea of innovation and creativity can coexist with necessary curriculum through PL.  Sharing that with concerned colleagues will be a great boost to morale, for sure!
  • The larger point is this: This moment of huge disruption requires us to think deeply about our goals and practices as educators, and it requires us to think deeply about the language we use. Words matter. More importantly, our thinking about what we want our kids to learn and our changed roles in that process matters. I’m suggesting that right now, because of the Web and the plethora of new technologies, the best thing we can do for kids is empower them to make regular, important, thoughtful decisions about their own learning, what they learn and how they learn it, and to frame our use of language in that larger shift, not simply in the affordances for traditional curriculum delivery that the tools of the moment might bring.
    • Jessica Athen
       
      I had the pleasure of listening to Will Richardson speak at our school two years ago. I learned so much from his presentation and I was so excited about all of the ideas he provided for our district. I was saddened by how many teachers in our district were really turned off by Will, and felt that the presentation was a waste of their time. Unfortunately, because of this pervasive attitude, we never really proceeded with his ideas for our district.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      These ideas require teachers to thinking beyond the traditional model, which is difficult for most to do or think about.  His example about flipping is a good example, it could be used to really create students who know how to learn, but most don't use it in a way that encourages personal learning. 
    • dwefel
       
      I love this section. It really talks about students taking charge of their learning. I think it is so important for kids to make goals and to really understand where they are and where they need to be. It is neat when students can see where they started and where they end and realize that working towards goals really pays off. (Dana Wefel)
    • alissahansen
       
      Yes, students will only learn that metacognition and how it works by making their own goals and plans of action. I try to have my freshmen do this at the start of each school year and we revisit the list through the year. It is hard for them to create goals, even with modeling, however, so this is something that needs a lot of work (both the teaching of the concept and creating the goals). 14 and 15 year olds have a hard time seeing past the right now, and most struggle even more with articulating what they struggle with and what they are good at. I want to really help my students with this aspect as that will really help us get close to a PL environment. (Alissa Hansen)
  • That was flipping the curriculum, but it still wasn’t flipping the control of the learning.
    • Jessica Athen
       
      I have never really understood how flipping a classroom is supposed to be the future of education like so many educators are saying it is. 
    • bakersusan
       
      I totally agree. If I use the definition of flipping explain by this article, I've been flipping my classroom for most of my career.
  • Dozens of teachers agreed that a truly personalized learning experience requires student choice, is individualized, meaningful and resource rich. This kind of learning allows students to work at their own pace and level, meets the individual needs of students, and perhaps most importantly, is not a one-size fits all model. T
    • Jessica Athen
       
      This statement does a great job of summarizing the goals of personalized learning, but I find myself wondering how we can move in this direction? There are so many changes that need to be made at every level of education and government that it seems almost impossible that we will actually ever be able to provide this type of environment to our students.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      Doesn't it also mean a lower student-to-teacher ratio? I also think it seems nearly impossible to implement on a wide scale basis. 
    • ahawthorne
       
      I agree the system needs to change from top to bottom. If we aren't able to see change in the levels of education we will continue to struggle to see significant change.
    • Lisa Hackman
       
      I agree whole-heartedly Jessica! Transitioning from a more traditional model to a personal learning model would be a HUGE undertaking. We aren't just talking about PreK-12 education, but post-secondary as well. Teacher preparation programs would need to be overhauled as well. How does everyone get on the same page in terms of what Personal Learning means and what it involves? There is much work to be done at all levels of the educational system as well as the government that funds the public educational system. I can't really wrap my head around this monumental task.
    • ascallon
       
      I agree students need to make their own choices.  How does the teacher motivate the student to choose more than the basics to get by.  Many students I see want to do the bare minimum and nothing more.
    • alissahansen
       
      I agree that change is going to be difficult and that the entire educational system would need to be revamped, and that would also mean students would need to be trained for this type of learning environment because they have been born into this "one size fits all" system. I am curious what that training would look like. I am also thinking that communities that are homes to these schools would also need to be educated on personalized learning, or I fear major problems. (Alissa Hansen)
    • nwhipple
       
      I changed up my teaching this year and did less large group time and more centers and small group instruction time.  I found that my time with a small group worked really well because it was individualized by what their needs were.  However, I am still tweaking my centers and how the kids motivate themselves.  I have things for them to do, but to get them to do "more" is the hard part, unless you are scaffolding it, constantly.  (Natalie Whipple)
    • moodyh
       
      In my traditional high school classes, I am trying to work towards a more personalized classroom experience, (although I realize in taking this class that it's actually more of a differentiation approach.) I think someone has to initiate the change and make it successful and more people will try it.  
    • alissahansen
       
      I am curious what you are doing to make your high school classroom more personalized. I am trying to do the same thing, but is very tough as I have classes of over 25 and see over 100 students everyday. I want this as my goal, but it seems like quite the mountain to climb. I like doing small groups, but my biggest issue is that I only see students for 45 minutes. I am not sure that is enough time to create a truly "meaningful line of inquiry, while building the skills to connect, synthesize, and analyze information into original products." (Alissa Hansen)
    • edamisch
       
      What if a student's pace is excruciatingly slow?  How will a teacher ever get through everything? 
  • Certain forms of technology can be used to support progressive education, but meaningful (and truly personal) learning never requires technology.
    • ahawthorne
       
      Some of my students are so sick of technology - and good for them. We need to remember it doesn't solve everything. 
    • lisa noe
       
      I agree with this statement.  Learning is a process of discovery, the acquisition or knowledge and sklls, and although you can learn many things by googling information, true learning goes beyond that.  You must know how and when to use this information.
    • bakersusan
       
      I too agree with this statement. Technology is a tool and shouldn't be expected to solve "problems" within education. I work in a 1:1 school, and as staff have come to a better understanding of technology and what it can and can't do, I see more true learning taking place. Once still has to remember that the most important component of learning are the people, not computers, iPads, etc...
    • alissahansen
       
       Agreed! I have students who cannot even tell time on a clock that is not digital or read a map...this is where things are going if we use technology for technology sake. (Alissa Hansen)
  • However, in order to navigate the system of accountability in the U.S. educational system, many school district leaders require public school educators to teach a specific curriculum that will be evaluated on standardized tests, while at the same time telling teachers to be innovative and creative within their classrooms. When that happens, the structures around the classroom leave little room for the kind of authentic, whole-child personalization many teachers dream of offering. The demands of the system — and education leaders’ desire to excel within it — lend themselves well to the computerized, modular and often very standardized system of “personalization” many ed-tech companies are offering.
    • Jessica Athen
       
      This statement really resonated with me. I feel like as a teacher, we are supposed to "do it all." We are supposed to meet the individual needs of each student while also providing a mandated one size fits all curriculum with the goal of better test scores, and if we can't do all of this, then we are told that we have failed as teachers.
    • Lisa Hackman
       
      Standardized testing is not consistent with personal learning. So how would schools be evaluated for progress? I don't see standardized testing going away anytime soon, but then again, it will take a long time to implement personal learning in a school, let alone the entire state and country.
    • Alison Ruebel
       
      Interesting and good point! I think this is important for all educators to realize and know that personal learning should never require technology. We need to use it to support our student's on going learning.
  • ‘We often say we want creativity and innovation – personalization – but every mechanism we use to measure it is through control and compliance.’
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      Maybe the idea of grading needs to be evaluated.  Even standards based grading does the same thing.  
    • ahawthorne
       
      This is always a difficult. How do we address this?
    • lisalillian311
       
      We use common rubrics that we design as a staff and use CCS as our guide.  It is difficult to set up at first, but it becomes second nature after a while.  On standardized writing, we set a baseline on three different student submissions so we are all on the same page while grading with the rubric, and we all understand what "proficient" and "approaching" clearly mean.  I have done this in two different districts--perhaps it is the same all over?
    • kainley
       
      We also use common rubrics that we designed. We are constantly changing them as we learn more about the standards. I love your idea of bringing submissions to a PLC and discussing what is truly proficient. I do wonder, how did you get your team to be brave enough to share?
  • not about giving students what they want, it’s about a
    • ahawthorne
       
      This is always a fear of mine. So difficult to not do for them what we really need them to do!
  • recommended learning path just for them.
  • Personalization is often used in the ed-tech community to describe a student moving through a prescribed set of activities at his own pace.
    • Lisa Hackman
       
      As a user of a couple ed-tech products, they are really no different than what happens in the traditional classroom. Students are receiving the same content but in a different way. This is still not a personal learning opportunity but an individualized learning opportunity. All of the students are still meeting the same objectives and completing the same work. There is really nothing personal about it. In a weak defense of these products, I have had students do quite well using ed-tech programs. They were at least showing up to school on a more consistent basis and completing work. That doesn't necessarily mean that it was the best way for them to learn but it was a slight improvement over their previuos experience in the traditional high school setting.
    • ascallon
       
      I don't think using a program like Edgenuity is personalizing for students.  All students use the same program.  I think it's more differentiation and individualization.
    • bleza66
       
      I agree with you that programs like Edgenuity are more about differentiation or individualization and not personalization but I think we can get there with programs like this if we can get the publishers to adapt them for more personalized choices. It can be built into the programming and if there is enough market f  or it they will create it. Education is a  slow moving train but with time and a push from educators this can and I believe will happen in the future.
  • because of the larger preoccupation with data data data data data.
    • ascallon
       
      A comment from a recent high school grad--standardized tests don't show individuality yet schools are funded by test scores. 
  • Tracking kids’ “progress” with digital profiles
    • ascallon
       
      I don't think it's fair that one test has so much value for a student.  Iowa Assessment scores are used for PSEO criteria, class placement.  If the student tests poorly due to illness, classroom environment, or just a bad day--it can have quite an effect on his/her future classes.
  • their choices are limited to when — or maybe, if they’re lucky, how – they’ll master a set of skills mandated by people who have never met them.
    • lisalillian311
       
      I worry about students who have gotten all the way to high school with a lack of intrinsic motivation.  So many are off track to graduate, so I guess I wonder how PL will help these kids if they already lack motivation.  Often, their goals are to be in a trade, which is fine, but they may see their parent making this work look easy.  For PL, I feel cautious around motivating the hard-to-motivate.
    • emilyzelenovich
       
      This is one of my greatest concerns as well. I have so many students who struggle to find anything to write about, read about, talk about that matters or is thought provoking to them. How would they handle the flexibility and independence that comes with PL? 
  • If we can’t engage our kids in ideas and explorations that require no technology, then we have surely lost our way.
    • lisalillian311
       
      Not every subject lends itself to technology, such as science, which requires hands-on lab work.
    • moodyh
       
      Another image comes to mind. https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/1d/eb/5c/1deb5c1cf49a5dbb7689131f3cc8b9a9.jpg I am all for technology as an OPTION, not as a requirement.
    • jenniferlb
       
      I totally agree! It is a seemingly impossible task to get students to put aside their technology for the sake of real world interaction.  I use technology, and invite them to use technology when appropriate and, ahem, innovative ;) but to get them interested in a novel is becoming increasingly difficult.  I feel that I share my passion for what we're learning, but it is a constant struggle to keep them interested without a screen.
    • kburrington
       
      I think of my favorite teachers and the classes I felt I learn the most in and I never remember there being a computer there. Technology is a tool not a substitute for teaching. KB
  • artificially personalized
  • Personalization is often used in the ed-tech community to describe a student moving through a prescribed set of activities at his own pace. The only choice a student gets is what box to check on the screen and how quickly to move through the exercises. For many educators that’s not the true meaning of “personalized learning.”
    • sheilig
       
      Is this where Skoolbo, Moby Max, Scootpad, and other sites like these fit? 
  • Simpler strategies, such as having kids choose, read, and discuss real books from the library may be more effective
    • sheilig
       
      YES! I don't see kids free reading enough. It's an inexpensive, easy, and effective strategy. It can be done when the internet is down, too! (I'm saying this because there have been times when we have lost power or internet and kids feel we should cancel school!)
    • alissahansen
       
      hahaha. I have heard that from so many of our students, and believe me, a little too often than not because our school is moving closer to 1-to-1 and it has done a number to the stability of the Internet, so of course as the district was increasing our bandwidth, there were a number of hours we lost power. But of course, I have students read independent reading novels each semester and create a project/presentation over what they choose, this gave them time to read in class! Most students really enjoyed reading a book, but I did have students look at me like I was crazy, "What, a book that is 100 pages or more?!"  (Alissa Hansen)
  • She cautions educators who may be excited about the progressive educational implications for “personalized learning” to make sure everyone they work with is on the same page about what that phrase means.
    • sheilig
       
      There is so much information out there that talks about "personalized learning." So, yes, I agree that everyone in the district needs to be on the same page about the definition and ways to implement it.
  • We often say we want creativity and innovation – personalization – but every mechanism we use to measure it is through control and compliance
    • kainley
       
      This is exactly why I think that PL will be a hard sell to my district. We ARE seeing growth on the test...does that mean that we are taking into account the whole child...no. However, this is how we measure growth and I'd like to know how we can even change that?
  • ‘We often say we wan
  • don’t lear
  • it is clear that all children don’t learn the same way and personalization seems to honor those differences.
    • nwhipple
       
      I agree that not all students learn the same way, especially at age 5.  I honor their learning differences daily but I am often challenged by grouping them based on their ability  and fitting in time to have them reach the standard for the day on their own.  The common core wants all kids proficient by the end of their school year in all their standards.  It gets tricky to personalize every child's learning and have them do it at their own pace when some may take 4-5 weeks to accomplish 1 standard.  This is where I worry about not having enough hours in the day and days in the school year.  
    • jroffman
       
      I agree too! Not all students learn the same way I also think that is why now in the preschool classroom I am having to teach students how to play. I think that even at a very young age kids are taught to wait and be told what to do. I always think back to my youngest brother who struggled in school, and how he was told he would never make it. He went into farming and now at the age of 26 bought his first farm and milks over 100 cows, I would say he is successful even though he didn't make all of the common core goals. 
    • jenniferlb
       
      When I think of the work I do with high school students, this is clearly something we deal with every day.  I present information in a variety of ways to attempt to meet the needs of different learning styles and I really try to "keep it moving" to avoid losing the attention of very "short-attention-spanned" kids! I think we can all relate to this, and I certainly agree that personalization will help adjust traditional learning to meet the needs of all students a little better. (Jennifer Betz)
  • A personalized environment gives students the freedom to follow a meaningful line of inquiry, while building the skills to connect, synthesize and analyze information into original productions.
    • kainley
       
      I love that students get choice. I love that they are connecting, synthesizing and analyzing. I love that they are creating something original. I guess I am wonder what a personalized environment would be for PL. In my class we follow the Daily 5 and with that, we have a comfortable reading space, cushions that can be brought to anywhere in the room, soft lamp light, tables for 4-6 students to work together, buddy areas.."home-looking." I mean is that what this is, or am I way off base?
    • jroffman
       
      I struggle with creating a personalized classroom because of space, when students start projects one day they have to be put away at the end of play time otherwise we won't have space for large group or table activities. I also struggle with enough adults in the classroom, students are not comfortable with that much freedom and want a teacher next to them for guidance, but one teacher to 18 kids just doesn't work most of the time. My other issue is a personal issue I am an all or nothing type of person and I get frustrated when it doesn't look like I think it should. In reality I am probally doing an okay job with personalized learning, but I have LOTS of improvements to make. 
  • the industrialized form of education that pumps out cookie-cutter students with the same knowledge and skills.
    • lisa noe
       
      I agree that many students have difficultly thinking outside of the box.  I believe that is because we have quashed individuality.  We ask everyone to conform to our standards.  Our society has a habit of criticizing those that go against the norm.  We expect all students to follow the same path and to want the same things.  Students don't want to be embarrassed for thinking or looking differently.  I see this happen frequently during group work.  There always seems to be a strong-minded individual who takes charge.  Many times other members' voices are never heard even though they may have equally as good of ideas, if not better.  Many students have zero confidence in themselves so they never stand up and let their voice be heard.  Hence, cookie cutters. 
    • alissahansen
       
      I am nodding my head in agreement to your every statement here Lisa. With all of the assessments and data driven curriculum we have not given students any room or confidence to be creative or innovative. And when we do ask for it, students are so reluctant out of fear and that fear is paralytic. PL has so many benefits. Don't we want our future citizens to be innovators and critical thinkers? I think we do and our current educational system seems to imprison any originality. (Alissa Hansen.
    • bleza66
       
      I agree with both of you (Lisa and Alisson) students today are afraid of being different or standing out because they are afraid of not being accepted. I also agree that society has taught us this lesson all too well. However, if we begin to initiate higher order, more individualized thinking and expression of ideas at an early age then our societal norms will eventually begin to change and persoanalized individual learning will become the expectation and eventually the new norm. We can only hope and dream for that day to come. 
  • Three words seem to be dancing around in my head of late when it comes to current thinking about education: “personalization,” “engagement” and “flip.” All three were on display on the vendor floor and in session rooms at last week’s International Society for Technology in Education conference in San Diego, one of the largest ed tech conferences in the world attended by upward of 18,000 people.
  • It meets the needs of an individual in a very standardized way, but it doesn’t take into account who that kid is.
    • moodyh
       
      This is what happened in my last school district.  The administration thought that a computer program could solve all the issues, but very few students learned well from a computer program.
    • kburrington
       
      We have been finding that technology works good for some students but not for all. Sounds familiar kind of just like direct instruction.
    • jillnovotny
       
      I think the issue is differences in the meaning of personalized learning. As we discussed in class previously, personalized learning is not the same thing as differentiation, which is supposed to meet students' needs. Personalized learning is truly about putting students in control of their learning and supporting them in developing that learning!
    • juliefulton
       
      When a student is unsuccessful in the traditional classroom we look to computer classes to fulfill the credit requirement. The focus is on successfully fulfilling the requirement rather than on learning. If schools were to turn to component recovery with a unit that allows personalized learning, the student could do both - learn and fulfill the graduation requirement.
  • Our kids (and we ourselves) are suddenly walking around with access to the sum of human knowledge in our pockets and connections to literally millions of potential teachers. It’s a dramatic shift that requires new literacies to navigate all that access and, importantly, new dispositions to take advantage of it for learning.
    • moodyh
       
      This line makes me think of this image. https://marinarn.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/pic1.jpg I think there will have to be some re"training" for teachers and students to be able to deal with the vast sums of knowledge available to everyone.
    • alissahansen
       
      Agreed! In my own English classroom, and I know I am not alone, students have access to millions of reviews and analyses of the literature we read in our own classroom so my goal is always to have them either create a product based on their own understanding of a concept, character, plot point, etc. or I do my best to give them choices for them to navigate their own understanding. A lot of "required" literature is all found online and there is so much out there on most aspects of each piece. Technology can make this aspect very difficult as students have all of this at their fingertips, and our goal as educators is for students to gain their own sense of meaning from what they have seen, read, heard, while also building skills that lead towards mastery along the way. (Alissa Hansen)
  • You want to really engage kids? Give them opportunities to learn personally, to create their own texts and courses of study, and to pursue that learning with others in and out of the classroom who share a passion.
    • dwefel
       
      This is a great piece in the article. It really got me thinking of how boring school is for kids. As an educator I 100% want my students to be engaged and having fun learning. It would be so great to hear old kids tell their younger siblings how much fun school is!
  • Technology and the Web has radically changed that concept.
    • alissahansen
       
      Technology has changed the way EVERYTHING is done in the classroom as students have access to EVERYTHING now. So, what can we do as educators to make sure they are having meaningful and authentic experiences in our classrooms? How do some of you deal with this issue? I know I put a lot of work into the in-class and out of class work that I have students do because many questions/answers can be found so quickly by students and this occurs anytime and anywhere. (Alissa Hansen)
  • “free to expand as a standardized individual.”[1]
    • alissahansen
       
      I think this is a great quote that truly shows just how contradictory our world is! And especially with education. (Alissa Hansen)
    • principalchris
       
      Alissa, I like this quote as well.  We are free to educate as long as everyone gets 100% on the standardized test.
  • more important to have the dispositions and the skills to create our own educational opportunities, not be trained to wait for opportunities that someone else has selected for delivery.
  • crucially more important to have the dispositions and the skills to create our own educational opportunities, not be trained to wait for opportunities that someone else has selected for delivery.
  • can explore almost every interest or passion in depth on our own or with others, it’s crucially more important to have the dispositions a
  • personalization only comes when students have authentic choice over how to tackle a problem
    • jenniferlb
       
      I like how this is stated..."authentic choice." We all want to be given choice in what we do each day...personally or professionally.  I think it is imperative to give students choice, when possible, in their learning.  But, the term "authentic" is what strikes me, because when I think of the choice I'm able to give students, I question whether or not it is authentic. When I offer students their choice of six different novels to read for a unit of study, is that truly authentic?  I'm doubting so.  It is a struggle, for sure.
    • katie50009
       
      I was also struggling with the word "authentic" here. Or even "how to tackle a problem." What problem? Why is this an important problem to tackle? Why? Would the student agree that it is worth tackling much less how to tackle it?
    • juliefulton
       
      I like the use of "authentic" however I am equally curious how a teacher manages a situation when the student does not believe it is worth tackling the question, as the previous reader noted. This is a great example of a need for PD - help teachers with strategies to inspire their students to want to take chances and risks to learn.
  • personalization only comes when students have authentic choice over how to tackle a problem
  • personalization only comes when students have authentic choice over how to tackle a problem
  • the prevailing narrative seems to be that we can’t engage kids without technology, without a smartphone, tablet computer or some other multimedia device or tool.
    • edamisch
       
      Technology is great and all, but it does have it's drawbacks.   A family friend was all excited that her baby could do XYZ on an iPad at a young age to find out later that her pediatrician thought that very thing might be why her speech was so delayed.  
  • better test scores
    • edamisch
       
      I've been interviewing and the question every district seems to ask it about data, data, data.  Two and four years ago, this was not the case.  I believe this is because of the high stakes testing trend in recent years.  
  • individualism yet experience a “relentless pressure to conform.”
    • edamisch
       
      This reminds me of the "hipster" trend - "let's all be different in the same way." 
  • “It’s so much cheaper to buy a new computer than to pay a teacher’s salary year after year.”[11]
    • edamisch
       
      There are districts using Rosetta Stone as opposed to foreign language teachers out there! 
  • One final caveat: in the best student-centered, project-based education, kids spend much of their time learning with and from one another.
    • edamisch
       
      I'll admit, there is one tiny, tiny part of me that thinks, "My parents' generation turned out alright without flipped/project-based/differentiated/insert every other educational buzzword here." Honestly sometimes I do wonder if all these best practice trends aren't leading to an egocentric, narcissistic  generation.  Selfies for example.  But then there's a larger part of me that knows the factory model doesn't work in education either.  
    • lisa noe
       
      I agree!  I think of all the amazing things that have been invented in history and wonder, how in the world did they do it without technology?!  I know that our world is changing, and that to continue to grow we must change, but sometimes things are better left as is. As I type that, I realize our educational system needs to be overhauled.  It's just that every time I turn around someone is trying to "sell" us something else they claim will work, and before we even have a chance to get it up and running something new comes along. :)
  • From what I’ve seen, flipping doesn’t do much for helping kids become better learners in the sense of being able to drive their own education
    • jenniferlb
       
      I have to agree with this statement.  With high school students who are over-involved (or resistant to be involved in anything at all) homework is rarely a priority.  Perhaps for a math class or a world language class where they have actual "work" to hand in, but when it comes to students finding reading time outside of class and putting as much effort into English is a challenge, for sure.
    • emilyzelenovich
       
      This is a common discussion in the English department at my school. We struggle to figure out how to make any kind of outside reading or homework a priority. We have tried providing more time in class, but then we often run out of time or students grow tired of doing one thing for too long. Trying to help them see value and meaning in the work we assign is tricky.
  • ‘We often say we want creativity and innovation – personalization – but every mechanism we use to measure it is through control and compliance.’
  • The Web has changed or is changing just about everything when it comes to how we think about the ways in which we communicate, collaborate and create.
  • It’s as if engaging them in learning without technology has become this impossible task.
    • kaberding
       
      It is hard to compete with technology.  When I think of technology, I think of even simple things like a cd player, video (the old VHS), radio station (for current news), etc.  As educators, we have been using technology to teach since we could get our hands on it. How about a simple cassette player with the ABC song on it?  I'm sure every educator has put their hands on any technology device that can help their students gain a better understanding of what is being taught. So I tend to disagree with idea that we shouldn't have to engage students without technology.  We should have to engage them with whatever is out there; doesn't that contradict the whole idea of listening to lecture is not an effective teaching strategy?  Basically, when I think of the term technology, I think of any form of it; not just the Web.  
  • Personalization promises better student achievement and, I believe, a more effective delivery method than any one teacher with 25 or 30 students in a classroom can compete with.
    • kaberding
       
      Personalization scares me to the extent that we are not only talking about teaching the content, but being an expert in whatever they choose as personal learning.  Or at least knowing how or where they can access all the information for their personal learning.  With class sizes only growing, I am nervous to see how planning, tracking, and assessing the learning will go.  
    • jillnovotny
       
      I will admit, this is the component of personalized learning I have not yet been able to wrap my head around. In thinking about how to manage the learning of all students in the classroom when the content may be different is kind of intimidating. Teachers who have experience with personalized learning like project-based learning have shared that it is not as difficult as it might seem and that the students work harder than they do. I think it is important that people don't get the idea that it is a hands-off approach from the teacher; it is simply putting the learning in their control and supporting them with developing their learning!
  • personalization,” “engagement” and “flip
  • personalization,” “engagement” and “flip.”
  • personalization,” “engagement” and “flip.
  • personalization,” “engagement” and “flip
  • “personalization,” “engagement” and “flip
  • personalization,” “engagement” and “flip.
  • “personalization,” “engagement” and “flip.”
  • engagement
    • kaberding
       
      When I think of these terms, I think of differentiation.  To me that is what personalizing, engaging, and flipping learning can be.  Only until you add the term personal does that change and move away from differentiation.  
  • system of accountability in the U.S. educational system,
    • katie50009
       
      I struggle with the systemic changes that will need to be made to have complete personalized learning for all students while still have some accountability for what goes on in the classrooms of America. I don't want to appear negative, and I am certainly for personalized learning, but I am conflicted on how this can happen and still have accountability
    • jillnovotny
       
      I completely agree with you that there are a number of systematic changes that will need to occur before personalized learning really takes hold in the US. In my opinion, there are still many ways to keep teachers and students accountable through personalized learning (i.e. still meeting the standards but through a project-based way). It is going to take some time for policy makers and other stakeholders in education to realize the possibilities personalized learning has to offer. I think it starts with having success with it in our own classrooms and success only comes through a number of attempts! I like to think of it as "If not us, who? If not now, when?"
  • We often say we want creativity and innovation
  • whole-child personalization many teachers dream of offering.
  • Personal learning entails working with each child to create projects of intellectual discovery that reflect his or her unique needs and interests
    • jillnovotny
       
      Whether you call it personal or personalized learning, this is what it is all about! To nurture students' natural curiosity, we want students learning about things they are passionate about. By supporting students in creating projects that reflect their unique needs and interests, we are truly teaching to the child. Again, this doesn't mean teaching one student about addition using basketballs and another ballet shoes, but about getting students actively involved in their learning and putting more of the control in their hands. 
  • the industrialized form of education that pumps out cookie-cutter students with the same knowledge and skills.
    • juliefulton
       
      I wholeheartedly agree with all of the comments and agree that we need to place emphasis on the young learners to change societal norms which are incredibly strong in the high school culture.
Jamie Van Horn

ollie_4: Educational Leadership: The Quest for Quality--article - 5 views

  • multiple measures
    • Mary Trent
       
      I think quality, multiple measures are important. Too often we give students one shot to get it beacuse we are so focused on covering the content or getting through the book that we miss the most important part....are the students learning the material?
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      As an educator, I have found that I am expected to give multiple measures from directives "on high" only to find myself not able to look at the data,analyze it, and make decisions about it. Yes, we are all at different periods of our lives, yet we all have been given only so much time.
  • responsibility for their own learning
    • Mary Trent
       
      Absolutely! Students should feel as though they are in control of their grades. They should be giving a clear picture of what is expected of them and offered options to get back on track if they fall to the way side.
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      I so agree. Giving students power and knowledge about their own learning is extremely engaging and motivating for the student.
    • Brooke Maine
       
      I also agree- my best students have always been the ones who take responsibility for their learning and not just because they want to earn an A, but because they actually care about their learning.
    • Dan Jones
       
      I will concur as well, when they have a clear picture of what is expected of them, they learn more and when the don't hit the target, they are still motivated to learn. Testing should promote learning
  • Effectively planning for the use of multiple measures means providing assessment balance throughout these three levels, meeting student, teacher, and district information needs.
    • anonymous
       
      It is so important to use many different measures to meet the needs of students, teachers and districts because of the large group at hand.  There needs to be a balanced use of these measures.  There are many things to consider with these assessments that the key is to find out what is important to know and how to go about presenting these assessments.
  • ...55 more annotations...
  • they can provide information about student progress not typically available from student information systems or standardized test results. The classroom is also a practical location to give students multiple opportunities to demonstrate what they know and can do, adding to the accuracy of the information available from that level of assessment.
    • anonymous
       
      Standardized test only give a certain amount of information for teachers to see.  Often times, it's a guessing game for kids.  In the classroom, students can be creative and add their style to the assessment with different opportunities to present the information.  
    • Dan Jones
       
      I like seeing teachers use a combination of testing approaches. I think kids get burned out filling in ovals, students like to be creative and can show that better through other means beside multiple choice or darkening ovals.
  • demonstrate
  • Stephen Chappuis, Jan Chappuis and Rick Stiggins
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      This is crazy--I have spent the entire day reading about assessment and this entire year have been working with Carol Commodore a colleague of Stiggins on this exact material. In fact, I am preparing it for professional development with my groups. Crazy!
  • Knowledge targets
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      These are vital to know since when you (see below) are ready to assess these, it is important to link the correct type of  target with the type of assessment/s that is/are best for assessing the target.
  • Reasoning targets
  • Performance skill targets
  • Product targets
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      I was unable to see the figures on this page regardless of the browser that I used. FYI.
    • Jason Martin-Hiner
       
      Same here....
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      Same here...I tried both Firefox and Chrome.
  • Selecting an assessment method that is incapable of reflecting the intended learning will compromise the accuracy of the results.
    • Dan Jones
       
      I think teachers create an assessment tool and think if they have a variety of response types, they have a good test. I think there needs to be an added emphasis on making sure the respones format matches the learning that has taken place.
  • This key ensures that the assessor has translated the learning targets into assessments that will yield accurate results. It calls attention to the proper assessment method and to the importance of minimizing any bias that might distort estimates of student learning.
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      This information aligns the assessment with the type of target that  is being assessed.
  • Specific, descriptive feedback linked to the targets of instruction and arising from the assessment items or rubrics communicates to students in ways that enable them to immediately take action, thereby promoting further learning.
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      I became very adept over the years as a writing teacher (and eventually began applying it to my teaching in general--reading and social studies) at descriptive feedback. I am an advocate and proponent because I have seen that feedback instead of scores/marks promotes learning. 
    • Jason Martin-Hiner
       
      This certainly aligns well with the information from last week and writing rubrics with "fix" correctives in order to promote student improvement. A great way to focus on the formative piece.
    • Holly Palmersheim
       
      I would like to see something added here about timely. Specific descriptive is great but if the student doesn't receive the feedback in a timely fashion it becomes more difficult for them.
  • The goal of a balanced assessment system is to ensure that all assessment users have access to the data they want when they need it, which in turn directly serves the effective use of multiple measures.
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      Our district is really moving in the direction of standards-based assessment and reporting. This really does present to all stakeholders the specific and most important data---how well is each student meeting the standards of the Iowa Core?
    • Jason Martin-Hiner
       
      I know one question that comes up frequently with groups when we discuss SBAR - how many times must students demonstrate they can meet a standard before they are "checked off"?
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      This creates a concern for me because so many students have it today and it's gone tomorrow. The forgetful hormones set in- in middle school.
  • In such an intentionally designed and comprehensive system, a wealth of data emerges. Inherent in its design is the need for all assessors and users of assessment results to be assessment literate—to know what constitutes appropriate and inappropriate uses of assessment results—thereby reducing the risk of applying data to decisions for which they aren't suited.
    • Lorilee Hamel
       
      This really should be taught in pre-service courses--but is not. And now that the information exists--I wonder why it isn't taught. Why aren't new/pre-service teachers entering the workforce with this information in their tool box?
  • Sound Assessment Design
    • Jason Martin-Hiner
       
      This entire realm is both challenging and time-consuming. In order to have a high level of confidence, assessments usually need to be used many times and checked for validity and reliability…especially if they are being used as a summative assessment.This entire realm is both challenging and time-consuming.
  • Assess learning targets requiring the "doing" of science with a multiple-choice test.
    • Jason Martin-Hiner
       
      As obvious as this statement is, and even though "doing science" has been an expectation in the Iowa Core (and now the NGSS), there is a general lack of 'performance assessments' in science - especially at the elementary level.
    • anonymous
       
      I'm not typically in the classroom, so I'm asking... why is that? Is it because performance assessments aren't readily available, not easy to score, not easy to administer, messy to set up, time consuming? If these are true, I see lots of barriers in the way of performance testing. Even though they may be more authentic and reliable.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I have found many districts concentrate on reading and math at the elementary level...as a result, science is on the back "burner".
    • Andrea Compton
       
      Mary, I absolutely agree! The publishers of the elementary reading series' are caught up in trying to include the required amount of non-fiction reading material for the students and so they have focused on material that is also grade level appropriate to what should be studied in the science and social studies curriculum at each grade level. Teachers are beginning to use the reading series' material as a substitute for real science and social studies lessons as a way to "save time" in their day and still cover all the required material. This does not bode well for the science and social studies learning of our younger students.
  • Figure 1 shows a 3rd grade math test plan
    • anonymous
       
      Figure 1& 2: can be seen in this version of this article: ( http://goo.gl/9S26Q )
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      Thanks Clair!
    • Sally Rigeman
       
      Strange that only "Number Sense" has 4 items worth 10 points! Could one question be weighted or did they really assign each correct answer 2.5 points?
  • Effective Communication of Results
  • results communicated in tim
  • Will the users of the results understand them and see the connection to learning
    • Andrea Compton
       
      This is my contention with MAP testing. As an AEA consultant, I think it's wonderful for tracking student progress, and making instructional decisions for students, but I have found in more than one school I work with that the teachers receive this data from the testing and then have no idea what it means or what to do with it. It is so sad! They have received training on how to use the results, but by the time the test takes place and they receive the data, they have forgotten how to access it and what to do with it, so in essence the test was a waste of time because it's not going to bring about instructional change for the students in the classroom
  • results provide clear direction for what to do next?
  • Students learn best when they monitor
    • anonymous
       
      I once read a study where students with behavior disabilities saw an improvement in their behavior when they began to track and chart their actions in a spreadsheet. When they could see the change in a chart it became a positive goal to make improvements and watch the trendline go up. Monitoring and taking responsibility.
  • Ongoing classroom assessments
  • Periodic interim/benchmark assessments
  • Annual state and local district standardized tests
  • betting
    • Holly Palmersheim
       
      It is difficult to think we are betting on these practices.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      Great point. I have always said, when we are assessing, we are not instructing. I have found as an educator, it's during the test that students will ask the most questions. I consider it low stakes testing when I can tutor them one on one and as a result, some of the best learning takes place.
  • summative tests, the reason for assessing is to document individual or group achievement or mastery of standards and measure achievement status at a point in time.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      I have found it interesting that we give semester tests, yet very few supervisors, parents, administrators, or students want to know the overall level of student performance....they just want to know the "grade". As a result, I see a need for doing summative testing a bit differently.
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      How would you do summative testing differently? This makes me think about the cumulative projects I have my students complete. Very rarely do students come in to find out how they did. I think I need to move the end date of those projects up a couple of days so I can sit down with the student and go over the project before the last day of class.
  • Teachers should design the assessment so students can use the results to self-assess and set goals.
    • Mary Overholtzer
       
      As an educator, I have found that having students self-assess is a lesson in itself. So many students think they are excellent, even after seeing many of their peers doing the same task with varying degrees.
    • Pam Rust
       
      I agree that we must teach our students how to self-assess. In some classrooms we have never asked them to do this, so we can't expect them to fully grasp the concept unless we provide ongoing support while they learn to self-assess.
    • Mike Todd
       
      I give a lot of written assessments in science, but have failed to make goal setting explicit. I think this could be really effective at getting students to view the feedback differently, especially if the student had to talk with the teacher about the goal.
  • Use a reading score from a state accountability test as a diagnostic instrument for reading group placement.
  • annual accountability purposes
    • Pam Rust
       
      How do we get our students to care when taking these tests (i.e. Iowa Assessments) so we can truly monitor their knowledge?
  • sacrificed to testing
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      Is it possible to over-assess? If new assessments are being added, will students get burned out from being tested?
    • Brooke Maine
       
      Yes! I definitely think students get burned out from testing. My district did away with a few non-required standardized tests and the students did better on what they were required to complete, because they felt it was more necessary and appreciated that they weren't being forced to do all of it.
  • students
    • Jodi Leimkuehler
       
      I think this is key - writing the learning targets in student/parent friendly language. I have started to transition mine into "I can" statements.
  • the use of multiple measures does not, by itself, translate into high-quality evidence. Using misinformation to triangulate on student needs defeats the purpose of bringing in more results to inform our decisions.
    • Brooke Maine
       
      I wish more people understood this! It seems like non-educators (and maybe some people in the education field) just think adding more measurements and assessments means that it is high quality evidence because they equate more evidence as high-quality evidence.
  • The assessor must begin with a clear picture of why he or she is conducting the assessment. Who will use the results to inform what decisions?
    • Brooke Maine
       
      Unfortunately, I feel like this is not something I was ever taught in college and it took me several years of teaching to really think about this and understand it. I definitely feel like I (and my students) missed out on some things in class that could have been better because my knowledge was lacking in this area.
  • selected-response formats
    • Mike Todd
       
      I would have liked to see more specific discussion about the creation of selected-response format questions. I know "concept inventory" type questions that were developed using student misconceptions from previous written assessments are extremely valuable at assessing student learning, especially when compared with traditional questions from a textbook publisher.
  • etter instructional decision
    • Andrea Compton
       
      I wish this were the case. So often I work with schools that are giving multiple forms of assessments in an attempt to insure that students are learning the core material and will do well on the Iowa Assessment only to find that the teachers have no idea how to interpret the scores and data they receive from the tests. This leads to no instructional decisions being made for the student after taking the tests and the testing being nothing but a waste of time.
  • it is not capable of informing the student about the next steps in learning.
    • Andrea Compton
       
      This is so true!! Unless a teacher provides feedback in some way - whether in a conference style or a written style - the student will have no idea how to improve. Too often high school students receive a composition paper back with a letter grade and no comments or only spelling corrections underlined. This does not help the student to know what it is that was done poorly - other than the spelling - or how to improve on the next paper. I firmly believe that even papers that are considered to be "A" papers need to have feedback given - what was done well, what areas might the student extend themselves in next time, what areas could be better even though they were sufficient for this assignment.
  • considered questioning the accuracy of these tests
    • Dan Jones
       
      I create very few tests as I am in special education at the high school level. I am most often proctoring, administering or trying to interpret test results. I actually find myself questioning the accuracy of tests more often than you would think. The students are often asking me what a particular question means. Without giving any clue to the answer, I find myself trying to clarify when I am asking the same question. The way tests are framed and questions are asked can affect the accuracy of tests. I think creating a test that provides accurate results is an incredibly hard task. Kudos to those that are good at it, we need more of you
  • This means that teachers need to write learning targets in terms that students will understand.
  • This means that teachers need to write learning targets in terms that students will understand.
  • This means that teachers need to write learning targets in terms that students will understand.
  • This means that teachers need to write learning targets in terms that students will understand.
  • This means that teachers need to write learning targets in terms that students will understand.
  • The assessor needs to have a clear picture of what achievement he or she intends to measure. If we don't begin with clear statements of the intended learning—clear and understandable to everyone, including students—we won't end up with sound assessments.
    • kellie kendrick
       
      This is very important to keep and mind, and is something that I had an issue with at the beginning of my teaching career. It is imperative that a teacher knows what the intended outcome of an assessment is going to be before writing that assessment, so that they can look to those outcomes for guidance when writing questions, creating rubrics, or deciding a number of points for the assessment.
  • and highlight crucial words (for instance, most, least, except, not).
  • and highlight crucial words (for instance, most, least, except, not).
  • and highlight crucial words (for instance, most, least, except, not).
  • and highlight crucial words (for instance, most, least, except, not).
    • kellie kendrick
       
      I have found that highlighting, bolding, or putting words in italics has really helped my students to pay closer attention to the directions or questions and has led to students increasingly getting answers correct.
  • , and highlight crucial words (for instance, most, least, except, not).
  • You can improve it by explaining why you think that will happen
    • Sally Rigeman
       
      Better - ask the student, "How could this statement be more complete? Are you missing something in this component of the rubric?
  • effective feedback
    • Sally Rigeman
       
      Resource: "The Power of Feedback" by John Hattie & Helen Timperley (2007) in Review of Educational Research.
  • For each assessment, regardless of purpose, the assessor should organize the learning targets represented in the assessment into a written test plan that matches the learning targets represented in the curriculum.
  • Quality
  • the assessor should organize the learning targets represented in the assessment into a written test plan
    • Jamie Van Horn
       
      This seems necessary if we are to achieve the highest level of assessment making sure we are actually assessing the learning targets appropriately, but I struggle with the fact that teachers have the time in their busy schedules or will take the time to create a test plan for every assessment they give.
  • Assessment literacy is the foundation for a system that can take advantage of a wider use of multiple measures
    • Jamie Van Horn
       
      Sadly, I feel assessment literacy is lacking in education. We not only need to focus on the assessments we give our students but also on training our educators and classroom teachers on assessment creation and effective use of assessment results.
  • Most assessments developed beyond the classroom rely largely on selected-response or short-answer formats and are not designed to meet the daily, ongoing information needs of teachers and students
    • Jamie Van Horn
       
      It's too bad that these tests are being used to make so many decisions in the education system when they are not fully assessing the students learning and mastery of skills.
anonymous

ol101-2020: Iowa Online Teaching Standards - 9 views

    • kshadlow
       
      I chose this criteria because having your course evaluated gives you valuable information to guide your next attempt. Reading through the student feedback of the course helps to know what you are doing right and what needs to be changed or tweaked to help students be successful.
    • tracyweber34
       
      Student feedback is essential. What do you use to get their feedback? I use either Google Forms or SurveyMonkey.
  • Designs the structure of the course and the presentation of the content to best enhance student learning, including using unit/lesson overviews and reviews, using patterns in lesson sequencing, and using appropriate visual web design techniques
    • kshadlow
       
      I chose this criteria because it encompasses the purpose for facilitating student learning, the goal. I like how it reminds me of all the components needed to ensure student success.
  • ...61 more annotations...
  • Understands the differences between teaching online and teaching face-to-face
    • mgadient
       
      moodle_iowa After being thrust into online learning in the spring, I learned this is vitally important. I am still learning how to be an online teacher, the preparation it takes, and how essential communication is with the student and his or her family.
    • ravelinga
       
      I agree, this summer has really opened my eyes to how important it is for a teacher to learn how to teach online. One of the most important parts is having consistent structure and clear expectations at the start.
    • lfinn16
       
      This is something that I am learning more about and believe is extremely important. What might work well in the classroom may not work as well online. Finding the best practices for the environment is essential to making sure the students are successful.
    • kshadlow
       
      I chose this criteria because it seems like a no brainer, but I realized after I started teaching a blended class how many little things are actually big differences between online and F2F courses.
  • Identifies and communicates learning outcomes and expectations through a course overview/orientation (Varvel IV.A, ITS 3.b)
    • tracyweber34
       
      This is important. I can see myself creating a screencastomatic video as an intro to each of my classes in order to meet this criteria.
    • jgeissler
       
      Moodle_iowa This is a good one. I have always known the "course syllabus" in my head, but especially next year, it would be super helpful to give a course syllabus to families. In the case that we do have to move online for a period of time, families could see where we are going like a roadmap to help their children achieve success.
    • mgadient
       
      moodle_iowa I agree, Jill! It gives families a roadmap, and if we have to suddenly switch modes, it is already in place. It will take some time, but the preloading should help in the long run.
    • ravelinga
       
      This is something that I need to do a better job with in all my classes. This summer I have been working on updating and improving my class syllabus to be a much better overview of the class and showing what is expected of them throughout the course.
    • conradam4
       
      I need to be better about posting and discussing learning outcomes before every lesson I teach.
    • Val Rosenthal
       
      Identifying the objectives can be easy for a teacher to do but the communication piece is more difficult. Students need to see what does that objective mean and what should it look like.
  • Tailors instruction to meet the different needs of students, including different learning styles, different interests and backgrounds, and students with special needs or whom are language learners
    • tracyweber34
       
      This is where teaching online can sometimes be beneficial as long as you provide various ways to learn--videos, text, using text speak, etc.
    • spaulsonsjcs
       
      Agreed! This is super important to meet the needs of all of our students!
    • mgadient
       
      moodle_iowa Yes! I think it calls for collaboration with specialist teachers to be sure we are providing the accommodations needed.
    • pbenezra
       
      Visual graphics and videos for visual and auditory learners. Checking in with and offering office hours and extra support for students who may need this. Accommodations for students with disabilities or other needs.
  • Promotes learning through online collaboration group work that is goal-oriented and focused
    • lfinn16
       
      I think this is very important in the classroom and online. When students collaborate they can share knowledge and learn from one another.
    • pbenezra
       
      Allowing students to do their own PowerPoint presentations of lesson material. Always letting students ask questions which are answered during Zoom meetings.
    • anonymous
       
      I feel this is the part that can be missing in online learning. How do you get collaboration and provide a safe environment. As the instructor, do you need to be involved in every interaction between students? Yes when you are dealing with younger students. I am still looking for tools that allow collaboration with adult supervision.
  • 5. Creates and implements a variety of assessments that meet course learning goals and provide data to improve student progress and course instruction (ITS 5)
    • tracyweber34
       
      In order to make an attempt to combat "cheating" in an online course, developing authentic assessments is crucial.
    • olga1203
       
      Just as in a F2F classroom, a variety of assessments should drive instruction. Assessment is important for both teacher and students.
  • 7. Engages in professional growth (ITS 7)
    • tracyweber34
       
      The OLLIE courses are perfect for this!!!
    • spaulsonsjcs
       
      Exactly what I was thinking!
    • Dee Hamlett
       
      I feel that all four of these sub-standards are critical to the professional growth of any teacher who is teaching an online course. Teachers need to stay current with technology, network with peers, and apply learned knowledge and skills to improve best practices.
  • Has experienced online learning from the perspective of a student
    • spaulsonsjcs
       
      This is a big one because then you can relate to how the students are feeling. Learning a new LMS can be frustrating and take time, so being able to experience that yourself and then apply that to what the students are feeling can help. I also think taking online courses helps you face many struggles students might have (such as being afraid to ask questions or participate). Again, you are experiencing the struggles students might have, which I feel back benefit the teacher by knowing what these struggles might be beforehand,.
  • Assists students with technology used in the course
    • spaulsonsjcs
       
      If we expect our students to use the technology, we need to be able to help them use it! I had one student this past spring who was confused on what I was trying to explain on our LMS. I ended up video taping myself and showing him what to do, and he LOVED it. It was good that I was familiar with the LMS and could then show him myself what to do. If a teacher can't assist the students with the technology they expect them to use, then they shouldn't be using it.
    • ljjohnson
       
      During the first week of online learning, I had an instructional Zoom meeting with my students and walked them through the "Instruction to Seesaw Tools" Activity that was going to be assigned. I "shared" my computer screen so that they could see me pointing out, describing, and using each feature on my "Sample Student" account. This was well worth my time because it explained to them how to use the tools and turn in their work on SeeSaw. I also told my students that they could ask me questions in the comments space for each assignment .When they had any questions, I would reply back to them that way and then they could finish up their work.
    • Val Rosenthal
       
      Many times we assume that students know how to use a computer lesson and how to read the expectations. Helping them to be able to use the programs will increase their success.
  • Understands student motivation and uses techniques to engage students
  • • Maintains an online social presence that is available, approachable, positive, interactive, and sincere
    • spaulsonsjcs
       
      This is essential!!!! I wanted my students to still know and feel like I was their teacher and I think it is important for any teacher to do this. Students still need to know we care and want to help them become better learners. I believe keeping in touch with my students daily/weekly was vital in their success this spring.
    • pbenezra
       
      In our Zoom classrooms I always try to greet each student as they enter, to check in how they are doing and whether or not I can hear them and they can hear me.
    • mstoner31
       
      Students need interact with their peers as well as their teachers. Teachers should provide opportunities for students to interact, as is appropriate. Weekly class meetings give the students a chance to see each other and to catch up.. This was very important--especially to our littlest learners during the spring 2020 shut down.
  • Understands student motivation and uses techniques to engage students
    • spaulsonsjcs
       
      This stuck out to me because this is something I tried hard to do with my students this spring. I knew that I had to find ways to motivate my students to do the work, and I would reach out to them individually to keep them motivated. I want to make sure I am keeping my students engaged when learning online and I am hoping I will be able to find more ways to do this if we have to continue to teach online this next school year. I think it is essential for motivation and engagement so our students still want to learn.
    • jgeissler
       
      You are SO RIGHT! In the classroom I can come up with incentives and I have a full toolkit for that....but last spring, I was struggling with online. Looking at the Maslov pyramid maybe the kiddos were stalled at the second step 'safety needs-security'. There was a lot of scary stuff on the news and through some reflections the kids that I didn't think would be bothered were really worried about the world. :( (Also, I can imagine being a middle schooler and being separated from my friends---ewwwwww!!!)
    • Dee Hamlett
       
      I agree Sam. Keeping students motivated and engaged online may be hard. I don't think the being on technology will be hard for us to do, as they love to game and talk to their friends. However, keeping their attention and focus on educational curricular might be a whole other ballgame.
    • vonderhaar
       
      I think it also helps to motivate students when they know the "why" in learning. Why is it important for us to know and why are we doing it. I think this is a little harder to get across in online learning. I know I did not do that as we were running a little blind this spring with the Covid situation. I need to improve in my directions to help students be more motivated about the work.
  • • Knows the content of the subject to be taught and understands how to teach the content to students
    • jbuerman
       
      It is essential that a teacher understands the content and is confident in their ability to teach it. If a teacher is not competent in the subject and hasn't taught it before, it would be difficult to teach an online course. I think one of the best ways to learn as a teacher is to see student's reactions face to face & learn along with them. This would be harder to do in an online setting.
    • dostera5
       
      It is extremely important for the teacher to understand the content, so they can teach it effectively to their students.
  • Utilizes a course evaluation and student feedback data to improve the course
    • jbuerman
       
      Teachers should always be willing to improve on their craft. Reflection should be from all stake holder's - parents, students and the teacher themselves. Especially as we do this for the first time - feedback can only make things better.
    • Dee Hamlett
       
      Gathering data and feedback from students and others to improve your course and teaching skills I feel is best practice. Teachers should always want to improve their teaching and want to make their course better. Not every student learns the same way, so what worked the first year may not work the next.
    • lfinn16
       
      If teachers don't use a course evaluation or ask for student feedback how do they know what went well or needs improving in the course. All teachers should want every student to succeed. It is important to welcome feedback and be willing to make changes that will improve a course.
    • conradam4
       
      I need to make it a priority to collect feedback from my students.
  • Selects and uses technologies appropriate to the content that enhance learning
    • jbuerman
       
      Content can sometimes look fun, but might be challenging for students to do. Their internet might be slow or their computer is not working right or it requires a program that they don't have loaded. These issues make the student focus more on the computer than on the learning at hand.
    • Dee Hamlett
       
      I agree with this standard. I love how it says appropriate to the content to ENHANCE LEARNING. Many times I observe technology use from other teachers as fluff and used just to be used. There is not a purpose or application to the students' learning. It is just in there to pass the time. Technology is a tool, and this tool should engage, foster learning, and encourage application of skills. Not to play a game, watch a video or movie, or just fill time.
    • bhauswirth
       
      I think this is a huge standard. I find myself sometimes using technology just to use it. It needs to enhance the learning instead of just there.
    • dostera5
       
      This standard stick out to me because the technology I choose for my students should be appropriate for their age and the skills/strategies they are learning. I want the technology to be effective and not just being used to use it.
  • Incorporates social aspects into the teaching and learning process, creating a community of learners
    • jbuerman
       
      Students are very social learners. Many of us have collaborative activities that they do in a face to face setting. It is important that we keep these social activities in an online course as well. Learning is definitely more fun with others!
    • Val Rosenthal
       
      I have never really thought about this as being a standard in an online class. After taking a couple of classes myself, I can see the benefits of creating a community of learners and bringing in the social aspects for my online learners.
  • Selects and understands how to evaluate learning materials and resources that align with the context and enhance learning
    • teacherin12
       
      "moodle_iowa" Learning to evaluate material is important because the internet has multiple sites with different information. My class researches saints every year and I have specific websites I ask them to research with because not all the sites are accurate. I have had to complete my own research in order to lead them to more accurate sites.
  • Has knowledge of and informs student of their rights to privacy and the conditions under which their work may be shared with others
    • teacherin12
       
      "moodle_iowa" Teaching students about being safe online and making certain they understand their own rights as well as the rights of others is extremely necessary. In our society, we have the rules of the road to follow and explicit classes for students learning how to drive. This standard jumped out to me because I feel there are not a lot of parents ensuring their child is safe online.
  • Provides opportunities that enable student self-assessment and pre-assessment within courses
    • teacherin12
       
      "moodle_iowa" At our school we are teaching the students about Growth Mindset and using self-assessment is key. Students understanding what they are failing at and learning how to fix it is a part of moving forward in their education. Using pre-assessments allows students to move above and beyond their strengths and to work on their not as strong areas with more practice.
    • conradam4
       
      I like the idea of allowing students to self-assess as well. This gives them to really reflect and be more active in their learning.
  • Sets and models clear expectations for appropriate behavior and proper interaction (
    • teacherin12
       
      "moodle_iowa" Being able to explain your expectations is important because it sets the tone for the entire class to be more successful. Whenever we were talking online I reviewed expectations to have better conversations that were helpful and inspired others.
  • Is knowledgeable and has the ability to use computer programs required in online education to improve learning and teaching, including course management software (CMS) and synchronous/asynchronous communication tools (chat, email, web 2.0, videoconferencing, webinar, whiteboard, etc.) (SREB B.3, Varvel III.B)
    • nkrager
       
      Teachers must be able to set up a course online successfully using the necessary tools. It seems that some think you can just a F2F class and put it online. There is a lot of prep work that goes into doing this successfully and knowing what resources/tools are out there is vital for success.
    • bonnieingersoll
       
      Definitely. I am feeling more and more unprepared as I learn what is needed to make online course work and all the resources available.
    • anonymous
       
      If you have ever had a face-to-face course or online course that the instructor was struggling to show, share or run something you know that impacts the effectiveness of the learning. I have had that experience and tend to focus on the problems instead of the content. I understand that technology doesn't always work but not knowing how to use it can be very distracting.
    • pumphreyk
       
      It is so important to be knowledgeable and have the ability to use computer programs required in online learning! This is exactly why I am taking this course! I need to be more knowledgeable.
    • anonymous
       
      If you have ever had a face-to-face course or online course that the instructor was struggling to show, share or run something you know that impacts the effectiveness of the learning. I have had that experience and tend to focus on the problems instead of the content. I understand that technology doesn't always work but not knowing how to use it can be very distracting. on 2020-06-19
  • Aligns assessment with course objectives (SREB I.3, Varvel VI.C, ITS 5.a
    • nkrager
       
      Hopefully this takes on the same importance as it does in a F2F classroom. Our assessments should align with the content we are teaching and finding ways to best assess this is critical.
  • Communicates with students effectively and consistently (SREB D.1, ITS 1.g)
    • nkrager
       
      This is so important in the online world. We want our students to know that we are "with them" and paying attention to them, just as we would be in a F2F class. This can actually be more time consuming as we may need to address each student individually to motivate, prompt, encourage, guide, etc and it will take longer than it would in a F2F setting. Feedback is so important in all settings!
  • Provides and communicates evidence of learning and course data to students and colleagues (SREB J.6, ITS 1.a)
    • dsunderman
       
      It is very important for students to see evidence of learning. This evidence of learning can be a real motivator for some students.
  • Demonstrates effective instructional strategies and techniques, appropriate for online education, that align with course objectives and assessment (SREB C.1, SREB G.6, Varvel V.C, ITS 3.d, ITS 4.b)
    • dsunderman
       
      Learning happens when effective instructional strategies and techniques are used. Effective instructional strategies and techniques for online learning are a whole new skill set for most of us.
    • conradam4
       
      I need to be better about posting and discussing learning outcomes for every lesson I teach.
  • Provides substantive, timely, and constructive feedback to students (SREB D.8, Varvel VI.F, ITS 5.e)
    • dsunderman
       
      Providing timely and constructive feedback can help student become stronger learners.
    • Dee Hamlett
       
      Timely feedback is very important. I remember as a child I would ask when the test was being passed back, just so I know how I did on the test. I still have students asking me when I will grade something or have a comment back to them by. I always tell my students I am available 24/7 via email for their programming needs, but sometimes they just want a quick check on their work. It is that constructive feedback that I feel needs to be precise and to the point, so they understand what you are asking of them and what they need to do to get the grade they are searching for.
    • dostera5
       
      Providing feedback is so important for the student. It is even more important that the feedback is given in a timely manner. This is one way to build a rapport with the student, and make sure they are understanding the content being taught.
  • Demonstrates techniques for dealing with issues arising from inappropriate student technological use (SREB E.7)
    • dsunderman
       
      This is very important and could be very difficult when learning is strictly online. I know filters can be put on devices but am not sure how that works.
  • Continuously uses data to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of instructional strategies (SREB J.7, ITS 1.c)
    • mdaniels44
       
      This is something I need to improve on
    • bhauswirth
       
      This is something that assessments, quick checks and tickets out the door will allow us to check what the students know and what I need to do to make sure they will understand later.
    • ravelinga
       
      This is an effective strategy for any teaching style. Sometimes when students are not understanding the content, the teacher needs to look back at how the content was taught and make a change. Also, if an instructional strategy is not effective there should be reteaching as well.
    • lfinn16
       
      This is essential to online and classroom instruction. It is always important to use data to drive instruction. By looking at data one can see if the students are understanding what is being taught.
  • Creates and implements a variety of assessments that meet course learning goals and provide data to improve student progress and course instruction
    • mdaniels44
       
      I think this is important and something I do
  • Engages in professional growth
    • mdaniels44
       
      I think a teacher should always want to learn and become better.
    • bhauswirth
       
      This is what I've been saying all along. Teachers need to continue to learn in order to continue to provide the best practices for students
  • Knows and aligns instruction to the achievement goals of the local agency and the state, such as with the Iowa Core
    • olga1203
       
      This is important because without the alignment we will end up with arrows pointing in random directions instead of one common goal.
    • bonnieingersoll
       
      It will be even more important this year to consider the district's standards. Our time will be very valuable since we have gaps to fill in from last year.
    • pumphreyk
       
      This is very true. We will probably need to look at previous grade's standards as well as our own since our students missed a third of the academic school year.
    • ljjohnson
       
      This is especially relevant due to the online learning that needed to be done this past spring. The teachers at our school will need to meet and discuss what standards were not met for each of our classes and make adjustments.
  • Creates a learning community that encourages collaboration and interaction, including student-teacher, student-student, and student-content
    • olga1203
       
      Learning is social. Collaboration and interaction help examine own understanding including misconceptions and deepen the knowledge and skill.
  • Has knowledge of learning theory
    • olga1203
       
      Theory is the basis of all the practical decisions that we make. Without a thorough understanding of the theory behind online learning, it would be easy to go astray. (True for everything else!)
  • safe environment
    • olga1203
       
      Maslow's hierarchy!
  • Demonstrates competence in content knowledge (including technological knowledge) appropriate to the instructional position (ITS 2)
    • Dee Hamlett
       
      As a computer science teacher and technology coordinator, I feel that it is important to know the content that you are teaching before you try to teach it to the students. Which also may mean you need to be certified to teach that content area, or have some background with the curriculum (as in Iowa you do not have to have a Computer Science degree to teach computer science, yet) However the most important asset of this standard is the assistance we should provide to students.
    • Dee Hamlett
       
      As a computer science teacher and technology coordinator, I feel that it is important to know the content that you are teaching before you try to teach it to the students. Which also may mean you need to be certified to teach that content area, or have some background with the curriculum (as in Iowa you do not have to have a Computer Science degree to teach computer science, yet) However the most important asset of this standard is the assistance we should provide to students.
  • Has experienced online learning from the perspective of a student
    • Dee Hamlett
       
      I feel that all four of these sub-standards are critical to the professional growth of any teacher who is teaching an online course. Teachers need to stay current with technology, network with peers, and apply learned knowledge and skills to improve best practices.
    • ravelinga
       
      I agree, one the best learning experiences for me was taking these classes and being a student again and seeing instructional strategies for a student's perspective. Going into next year, I have already implemented changes to my classes because of my experience as a learner and a student.
    • pbenezra
       
      This is what we are doing on this course. I also get this experience somewhat when I am in an online Professional development meeting at my school.
    • joanmusich
       
      It is very important the a teacher has went through an online class (or 4) so they have a good idea of how it works, what a student goes through, where hang-ups occur, and just to know, it is easy to get stuck.
  • Communicates assessment criteria and standards to students, including rubrics for student performances and participation
    • mgadient
       
      moodle_iowa This is definitely an area that we use in face-to-face teaching, so I would expect that it would be included and important to online teaching. It is good for students, and teachers, to know the expectations that are needed for an assignment, assessment or project. It is a guideline to follow until you reach the desired product or learning objective.
    • anonymous
       
      Communication within online courses is more difficult. It can be difficult to share in detail the expectations and answer many questions as you can in a face-to-face classroom. Clearly stating assessment criteria and providing some kind of framework. like a rubric, is important to a successful learning experience.
  • Applies research, knowledge, and skills from professional growth to improve practice
    • olga1203
       
      It is equally important whether we are teaching F2F or online. A teacher is a lead learner. We set the example, we learn, we reflect, we improve our practice. The key here is to incorporate the new learning. We simply cannot afford to attend PD sessions and never put new learning into practice. That would be malpractice!
  • Demonstrates competence in planning, designing, and incorporating instructional strategies
    • bhauswirth
       
      I believe teachers are lifelong learners. This standard is something that teachers will continue to do when their online/blended courses develop.
  • Understands and uses data from assessments to guide instruction
    • bhauswirth
       
      I stated this above that data from formative assessments need to drive instruction. Then you adjust to enhance student learning.
  • Demonstrates growth in technology knowledge and skills in order to stay current with emerging technologies
    • pammason
       
      This should be a given with online teaching and is exactly why I am taking this class, to grow my tech skills and knowledge. This field changes so quickly , one must always be growing and adding skills to stay effective.
  • Understands and uses instructional pedagogy that is appropriate for the online environment and meets the multiple learning needs of students
    • pammason
       
      This is interesting because in our brick and mortar classrooms we can often have other teachers that work with some of our students due to special education needs, physical needs, or language needs, but in an online classroom you are the only teacher. Makes me wonder if online teachers ever have these types of people as resources.
  • Networks with others involved in online education for the purpose of professional growth
    • pumphreyk
       
      I know that networking with others involved in online education is vital for me because I am so new to online learning.
  • Establishes standards for student behavior that are designed to ensure academic integrity and appropriate use of the internet and written communication
  • Creates or selects multiple assessment instruments that are appropriate for online learning (SREB H.1, Varvel VI.C)
    • ljjohnson
       
      This is important because some students perform better through different ways. For example, I would have some assignments that required oral or typed answers, some required drawings, and some required the students to take a picture of an item that represented the lesson we were learning. Depending on the assignment, the students could pick the way they wanted to use for their answers.
  • Continuously uses data to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of instructional strategies (SREB J.7, ITS 1.c)
    • dostera5
       
      It is important for a teacher to use data to drive their instruction. This way the teacher can pin point where the student needs help.
  • Understands and uses course content that complies with intellectual property rights and fair use, and assists students in complying as well
    • mstoner31
       
      This hits me where I live. It is so important to not just "talk the talk" about photocopying music but to actually share with the students my understanding of copyright laws concerning music photocopying. Thankfully I have purchased a program that I can use in the classroom and can copy as needed.
  • Meets the professional teaching standards established by a state-licensing agency, or has the academic credentials in the field in which he or she is teaching
    • mstoner31
       
      It is important for educators to meet the standards set forth by the state to protect the students, ensure their education and prepare the students for their future. As education and society evolve, educators will be required to demonstrate their mastery of technology as well as their specific field of study.
  • Continuously uses data to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of instructional strategies (SREB J.7, ITS 1.c)
    • conradam4
       
      I'm a data girl. Love seeing the data on new instructional practices and love using data to inform future instruction.
  • • Knows the content of the subject to be taught and understands how to teach the content to students
    • mstoner31
       
      The state has adopted requirements for teachers to protect our students, to provide the best trained professionals for our schools and to insure appropriately licensed teachers are leading classrooms. When I was first in Iowa, it was quite a battle to obtain my endorsements. Reciprocity between Illinois, Iowa and Nebraska didn't exist and my administrator went to the wall for my licensure.
  • Selects and uses technologies appropriate to the content that enhance learning
    • Val Rosenthal
       
      This has been a challenge for me. I feel like I'm always looking for the best technologies to enhance my content but they change so fast that it is difficult to be committed to one. I continue to read blogs and other math posts to learn more about math technologies.
  • Demonstrates techniques for dealing with issues arising from inappropriate student technological use (SREB E.7)
    • sara_hazel
       
      We have had to address students that have been using technology inappropriately and each case is dealt with on an individual basis. It is very important to have policies and procedures in place to ensure students learn from their misuse and don't do it again.