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mbittman

A Beginner's Guide to the World of Self-Publishing - YouTube - 5 views

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    YouTube, Full Sail University, Published on Mar 12, 2014 "Technology has made it easier than ever to publish your own work. This Full Sail University panel discusses how to successfully self-publish your own work, and how to do it without getting lost in the sea of all of the other content that's out there." A panel of successful self-published authors talk about the flexibility of new technology within the publishing realm to sell books/music: formatting your work, business models, copyright , print on demand options, music aggregators,, marketing, worldwide distribution, etc.
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    The video length of one+ hour might seem a bit daunting at first, but I ended up watching most of it in one go - this is really an excellent and easy-to-follow overview of all the important aspects of self-publishing. (I was especially pleased that this video listens to well in the background, as opposed to most other videos that I find require more "involvement" and that do not fit well with a busy day schedule.) What is best about this is that it is all based on actual people experiences - successful self-published authors participating in the panel, and sharing their publishing & tips in real-time. I was especially curious to find out about the marketing side of of self-publishing a book, and was pleased to discover quite a few helpful ideas and tips. As someone who is thinking about self-publishing soon, this has answered a lot of questions and definitely sparked confidence in the process as a whole. Thank you very much for sharing! Hopefully, this will help and encourage many more self-publishers to be.
Kevin Stranack

Knowledge Unlatched: A new business model for Open Access monographs? › Hybrid Knowledge Lab Notepad - 2 views

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    "In a nutshell, Knowledge Unlatched would act as an intermediary between a global library consortium and individual academic publishers. The latter would approach Knowledge Unlatched with titles they would like to see published in Open Access. Knowledge Unlatched would then regularly send out a list of titles to libraries which would opt in to fund the unlatching, that is, the publication in Open Access, of certain titles. The titles so funded would be released with a Creative Commons licence by the publishers which retain the right to sell special editions and extra services around the titles. "
Kevin Stranack

The Enclosure and Alienation of Academic Publishing: Lessons for the Professoriate | Peekhaus | tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique. Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society - 0 views

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    "This paper interrogates and situates theoretically from a Marxist perspective various aspects and tensions that inhere in the contemporary academic publishing environment. The focus of the article is on journal publishing. The paper examines both the expanding capitalist control of the academic publishing industry and some of the efforts being made by those seeking to resist and subvert the capitalist model of academic publishing. The paper employs the concepts of primitive accumulation and alienation as a theoretical register for apprehending contemporary erosions of the publishing commons through the enclosure effects that follow in the wake of capitalist control of academic publishing. Part of my purpose with this discussion will be to advance the case that despite a relatively privileged position vis-à-vis other workers, academic cognitive labourers are caught up within and subject to the constraining and exploitative practices of capitalist production processes."
liyanl

Confronting global knowledge production inequities - 2 views

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    This is about the inequitable global power and how it dynamics the confronting global knowledge production in nowadays.
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    Underlying this notion of global knowledge production inequities is how developed countries "The Global North" dominate modern knowledge systems. This hegemonic control of global knowledge, driven by increased globalization, places pressure on virtually all societies to adopt global values and services. While this development does have positive implications (e.g. better understanding of modern health practices, nutrition, environmental protection, governance systems, etc), on the negative side, the imposition of cultural forms from the developing world could be considered a form of political and economic domination. This leads to the increasing homogenization of cultures and a threat to local knowledge, and the exacerbation of local differences and inequalities through uneven access to such knowledge and the means for it's application. The production of knowledge implicates and is implicated in power relations, as those with superior technology cannot only generate but also store, monopolize and disseminate information to safeguard their interests. Foucault (1972) suggests that the relationship between power and knowledge has its origin in the ownership of the means of material production and technical expertise. According to Said (1978), Western powers in a colonial and post-colonial context, using agents in developing countries, have been able to develop elaborate cultural and political institutions where knowledge production exists with supporting mechanisms that dominate and suppress African communities. In a critical examination of development policies and programs in Africa, Okolie (2003) considers these to be shaped by knowledge and assumptions about knowledge production that are primarily Euro-American centered, and are consequently "exclusionary and often contemptuous of other ways of knowing" (Okolie, 2003). The establishment of the continent's universities and research centers was primarily driven by Western powers, and the African elites who h
kvdmerwe

True cost of science publishing - 2 views

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    This is an interesting article about the cost of formal publishing verses open access publishing. Although there seems to be a lot of secrecy around the issue, the research shows that the total cost for open access publishing is a lot less than formal publishing. That appears to bring the perception that the open access works are not as good as those published in formal journals. Despite this factor there is growing encouragement to authors to publish their work in open access sources, but traditional models remain very popular. A large percentage of these journals actually allow people to publish online, although some do ask for a time delay. Despite that, many authors do not proceed to publish online after they have gone through the formal process although some authors are obliged to do so by their institution. It could be a good test to see why these authors do not take the step to publish online. Reasons could range from apathy, to not enough publishing of the process, to a need not to share the information with everyone. Economically, there is also a concern that open access sources will become more expensive as more authors begin publishing in this way.
Kevin Stranack

Universities 'get poor value' from academic journal-publishing firms | Science | theguardian.com - 4 views

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    Compares the cost of articles from society and non-profit publishers to those of the major commercial publishers.
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    An extremely powerful piece of research. I find it fascinating that the researchers were able to use US Freedom of Information Act requests to uncover the licensing costs. As a librarian, it is extremely frustrating to be bound by non-disclosure agreements when it comes to our subscriptions.
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    Its crazy. The numbers (of profit and control) for the publishing companies is astronomical!
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    Universities have received a poor deal from the system of private, subscription-based access to knowledge production since the port WW2 commercialization of the scientific knowledge industry. It is absurd that the university or research funder supplies the content (the research), pays for the authoring (the time of the researcher writing the article), and provides and pays for the time of peer reviewers and academic editors. In addition, it often pays page charges or formatting charges to publishers. It then cedes copyright and finally buys back its own research at prices that have escalated at four times the rate of inflation in the past decade and a half! Considering most of this research is conducted using public funds, it becomes a moral argument when public resources are used once again to purchase access to the outputs of this research. The commercial model of disseminating research does not obey the rules of supply and demand. A relatively small number of 'core' journals occupy monopoly positions, in that university libraries have to subscribe to access their content, whatever the cost, because these journals have been established as 'must-have' resources. While the practice of 'bundling' offers the advantage of bulk pricing, it reduces room for choice, as bundles consume large chunks of library budgets, making it difficult to subscribe to smaller, individual titles. In addition, the inflexibility of indexing systems makes it difficult for new journals to establish themselves; thus compromising the potential for smaller niche subjects and newer interdisciplinary areas. Thankfully the global inequalities engendered by the commercialization of scholarly knowledge are being challenged by open access.
Stephen Dale

Recap of 2014 Open Knowledge Festival | Opensource.com - 1 views

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    I was lucky to be in Berlin with some colleagues earlier this month for the 2014 Open Knowledge Festival and associated fringe events. There's really too much to distill into a short post-from Neelie Kroes, the European Commissioner for Digital Agenda, making the case for " Embracing the open opportunity," to Patrick Alley's breathtaking accounts of how Global Witness uses information, to expose crime and corruption in countries around the world.
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    A useful summary of some of the key take-aways from the 2014 Open Knowledge Festival, courtesy of Tariq Khokhar From the article: 1. There are some great open data initiatives around the world and two common themes are the need for a strong community of technologically literate data re-users, and the sustained effort needed within governments to change how they create, manage and publish data in the long term. 2. Spreadsheets are code and we can adopt some software engineering practices to make much better use of them. There are a number of powerful tools and approaches to data handing being pioneered by the scientific community and those working in other fields can adopt and emulate many of them. 3. Open data fundamentally needs open source software. App reuse often doesn't happen because contexts are too different. Reusable software components can reduce the development overhead for creating locally customized civic software applications and a pool of high quality civic software components is a valuable public good worth contributing to. Reading time: 15mins
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    I see that Google are the sponsors of the 2014 Open Knowledge Festival but despite having little Knowledge about Google's role and interest in the Open Knowledge , I also feel they are the culprit when it comes to data manipulative for their own profit motives.
Kevin Stranack

How it works - Knowledge Unlatched - 5 views

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    The Knowledge Unlatched model depends on many libraries from around the world sharing the payment of a single Title Fee to a publisher, in return for a book being made available on a Creative Commons licence via OAPEN and HathiTrust as a fully downloadable PDF.
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    This is a great slide show. Sums it all up. Thanks. I may pass this on to my collection development manager.
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    Great concept! This goes to show that Open Knowledge does not equate to free and giveaway. I love the blend of effectively using a crowd-funding model through libraries to ensure appropriate fees are paid to cover costs and compensate authors and publishers to enable open access under a CC license across a global library network. It would be interesting to see the follow up to this. I would think this approach would be useful for school libraries in a district or region to use this approach and effectively share the resources.
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    Interesting take on what will happen to the future of libraries and how information will be published and sold. It's important to realize that nothing comes free and that we should promote a business model that benefits content-producers as well as consumers.
Jamie F

Open Access Scholarly Journal Directory - 4 views

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    This list is a helpful tool for authors who are publishing their work in Open Access Journals. It is also helpful for librarians who are acting as advisors for Open Access publishing. Beall's List: Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers. This is a list of questionable, scholarly open-access publishers. It is recommended recommend that scholars read the available reviews, assessments and descriptions provided here, and then decide for themselves whether they want to submit articles, serve as editors or on editorial boards.
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    The long list of predatory publishers and journals by Beall is quite daunting. Is this another indication of how cynical a person has to be in every aspect of life - even scholary pursuit? Thankfully there's a record to alert stakeholders of potentially unscrupulous publishers and unvalidated journals.
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    As I was working on my final project I found myself only able to name 1 OA Journal: PLOS. I wanted to know if there were any other big players in the game, much like the top commercial journals. As a result, google came up with the above site, which works like an index or directory for OA Journals. It's good to see in light of the difficulties that closed access journals have been causing in countries that are digitally divided from affluent ones. Hopefully with the growth of open access titles we will see the digital divide and information gap close. Happy browsing! And please post any other open access titles you have come across! Lets popularize them in our network! One more: http://doaj.org/
Raúl Marcó del Pont

The Knowledge Commons: Research and Innovation in an Unequal World - 0 views

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    Free access to 3 articles: The Unfolding of the Knowledge Commons pp. 13-24(12) Author: Hess, Charlotte Free Content From Lobsters to Universities: The Making of the Knowledge Commons pp. 25-42(18) Author: Caffentzis, C. George Open Access Scientific Knowledge and the Developing World pp. 43-69(27) Author: Contreras, Jorge
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    Hi Raúl. Thanks for sharing these free resources. Which one do you like best? Which new insight did you gain?
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    I think Elinor Ostrom's approach to commons pool resources (used by Hess, for example) is very useful not only for understand the case of natural resources as commons (the tragedy of the commons to which it was originally applied), but to matters more close to this course, as knowledge. The approach is useful because it complicates the original perspective on commons. Originally (Elinor Ostrom) her perspective considered only group boundaries clearly defined (very small groups, peasants or indigenous); rules governing the use of collective goods well matched to local needs and conditions; cases where most individuals affected by these rules can participate in modifying the rules; the right of community members to devise their own rules is respected by external authorities; monitoring mechanisms by community & graduated sanctions. With the new commons (surprisingly, not only knowledge but roads, budgets, radio spectrum; medical commons, atmospheric commons and even silence as commons), new questions rises on the evolution or building new types of commons with no pre-existing rules and norms; increasingly complex; with size, communities, incentives often unknown; extremely dynamic; reactions to threats of enclosure; heterogeneous community; new forms of collaboration and collective action; and global in many cases. I think is a perspective that can help a lot in the case of knowledge and new forms of learning.
Guaraciara Silva

HOW WE CAN PUBLISH IN WEB? - 5 views

Good evening! That is a very interesting post about how we can publish in web our own materials. http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2010/12/7-visually-appealing-ways-to-publish.html#.VC9wq2ddXkU K...

publish open knowledge module5 publishing materials own teacher web

started by Guaraciara Silva on 04 Oct 14 no follow-up yet
shirley

Publishing: The Economist Publishes an Online Essay About the Future of the Book - 3 views

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    "The five-chapter essay (5000+ words) is titled, "From Papyrus to Pixels: The Digital Transformation Has Only Just Begun" and is available in web or book-like formats. It can also be listened to. It includes several charts and a bibliography is also included."
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    Very good essay about the future of books. I particularly liked chapter two where you get a kind of mixed image of the current state of the book; on the one hand, it is stated that e-book sales are declining to the benefit of the physical book, but on the other hand it discusses how giants like Amazon has a very negative effect on the book business. Interesting for sure!
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    You are here: Home / Uncat / Publishing: The Economist Publishes an Online Essay About the Future of the Book Filed by on The five-chapter essay (5000+ words) is titled, "From Papyrus to Pixels: The Digital Transformation Has Only Just Begun" and is available in web or book-like formats.
graneraj

The cost of scientific publishing: update and call for action | Open Access Working Group - 2 views

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    Opening knowledge is great. Sharing knowledge is vital. In the past, publishers were the sole mediators for the dissemination of knowledge in printed form. In our, digital age, sharing has become easier thanks to the internet. Yet, although all areas of society have embraced the internet as THE sharing medium, scientific knowledge has lagged far behind.
mbittman

Learning in snippets - 1 views

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    A successful author on YouTube, Matt Santoro, uses YouTube as a teaching tool, publishing a new video on some aspect of publishing every Saturday.
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    A successful author on YouTube, Matt Santoro, uses YouTube as a teaching tool, publishing a new video on some aspect of publishing every Saturday.
Balthas Seibold

Learning by Sharing- How global communities cultivate skills and capacity through peer-production of knowledge - 12 views

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    This piece was published as part of the GIZ compendium "10 trends in open innovation" and talks about self-organized and connected peer-to-peer learning for sustainable human development worldwide. Might be of interest as additional resource for Module 11: Global Perspectives on Equity, Development, and Open Knowledge
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    There are lot of ways to learn nowadays, technology spreads and most of the time it adds to our knowledge thru the information we get. It can be thru our friends, research, or even a single click over the internet. Shared thoughts helps us to understand and accept more about the particular topic, freedom has its own process that could eventually produce a network to others.
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    Now people become students and teachers depending on the topic. We can share information, skills . . . that answer the question of what we are and what we will go . . . Non-formal education is more and more important not only in an individual but also in the society. Technologies and Internet can help us to develop our identity (individual and global).
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    Dear Pris, dear Jurado, thanks a lot for your comments. I like the ideas and I would particularly like to know more about the thought, that "freedom has its own process tht could eventually produce a network ...". Thanks and cheers, Your Balthas
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    Thanks for sharing this great article! These topics are where I would like discussions about open access to start. We may be able to use that base of peer learning communities to think about all the other issues of open access in a new light.
liyanl

Knowledge Should Not Be Trapped Behind A Paywall: Get Ready For Open Access Week - 5 views

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    Open Access Week is less than a month away! Now in its eighth year, Open Access Week is an international event that celebrates the wide-ranging benefits of enabling open access to information and research-as well as the dangerous costs of keeping knowledge locked behind publisher paywalls.
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    Hi Kim Baker ...i've been involved in the past about OA week and ..what do you think of preparing something about OKMOOC (a poster, a declaration, whatever..) to be shared during that week? shall we talk about it on Googpe + group? Federico Monaco
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    Hi Kim, Thanks for sharing! Until now, I'd never heard of Open Access Week. I'd love to hear how both you and Federico have been involved in the past and what your communities (both online and off, local and nonlocal) have done to highlight open access during this week. I did a bit of searching, and it turns out that my school has a whole series of events planned for OEW, including some super interesting sounding lecture and a few documentary screenings. I'm very excited! http://oaweek.open.ubc.ca/ Amanda
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    Knowledge should be able to share with people, Knowledge should not be trapped behind a paywall. For those who needs the information but couldn't get the information because they need to pay for it, this doesn't make any sense to me. So many paper and research by scientists are funding by government which the tax payers have contributed a lot on funding. Thus people should have access to those information.
lubajung

Publishing. Share research - 0 views

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    This is a great platform to share and publish research. Graduate and undergraduate students, independent researchers, faculty members, alumni, etc. can create their own account, publish their papers, exchange ideas and news, ask for an advice, track own and others papers and posts, and more. It provides open access to all published materials. It is a very useful website. I am a member and I recommend to check it out.
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    This is a inspiring resource for all the students. They acquire a chance to show their ability and work.
janetw_suiching

Information Geographies - 1 views

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    Many interesting charts and data of the global internet use, access, and contributions
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    Cool!! It's so valuable to see behind the scenes of a lot of the open (or closed) tools we use. These images, maps, and infographics are really neat and use a lot of data that probably gets forgotten about in a lot of discussions. Thanks for posting!
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    Atlas, publications, charts and tables of global information and internet geographies and impacts on information access, information production and information distribution, done over a four year period by Oxford Information Institute. Findings, data, and publication will be published in Open Access formats and platforms. The website is simple but contains lots of information relevant to the topics in Stanford. There are links to external related publications about information geography, access, distribution and production. Very good website. Some limitations include: bias from the two developers and producers as well as institution itself, unknown (not identified) contributors and sponsors.
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    A very valuable collection demonstrating how economic, political, cultural and linguistic ties impact the flow of knowledge is and information. Of course, such charts do little to explain, why this happens and where a more even distribution of knowledge is desirable. Also, the data that lies behind the visualisations is not always open. Especially vauable are the links to the data collections that are accessible.
melduncan

A follow-up resource to the video on scholarly publishing in Africa - 1 views

Greetings all, As I mentioned in a post regarding the video on the challenges and perceptions of open knowledge for knowledge in Africa, I was reminded of a video I watched by an African novelist...

module11

started by melduncan on 18 Nov 14 no follow-up yet
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