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Open Education Week 2014 - 0 views

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    The Open Education is one of the most discussed topics on Education internationally today. Can be defined as open Education practices that characterize the opening of access to knowledge, ways of Education, Education technologies, Educational systems, models of Educational management, leadership and certification. Integral part of the Open Education are OER (Open Educational Resources), materials of teaching, Education and research, in any format or media, licensed to allow their reuse, adaptation and sharing by others. Since 2006 ABED disseminates OER and Open Education. Prof. Fredric Litto in 2006 wrote about open content and in 2009, the publication of the book 'Distance Education: State of the Art vol.1', ABED - Pearson Education, which won the Premio Tortoise brought the seventh of chapters on concept of openness in ODL open University of Brazil, REA, Education through virtual and digital libraries and digital repositories and virtual, written by Andreia inamorato dos Santos, Ronaldo Mota, Fredric Litto, Ana Paula Leite de Camargo and Ana Cristina Birth , respectively. Since then, in Brazil, have sprouted traces of a theme that would be provided shortly international prominence - Open Education. To expand the discussion of the topic in Brazil and international trends, ABED creates workgroup ABED OPEN. Coordinator for the group, ABED invited Dr. Andreia inamorato, international researcher in the field of open Education, OER and ODL. "The group intends to involve the participation of teachers of basic and higher Education, researchers, students, Educational administrators, publishers, departments of Education, nonprofits and private institutions," says Andrea. "The goal is to have the collective and representative participation of various social actors to be a working group with legitimacy, representativeness and goals, and can promote discussions on Educational priorities in Brazil with respect to open Education", says the researcher.
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Peer Learning in Higher Learning - 3 views

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    In everyday life we are learning continually from each other. Whatever the situation, most of us draw on the knowledge, skills and experience of our friends and colleagues. Within any learningal setting learners naturally engage in informal peer learning to make sense of their course, test their ideas and share their concerns.
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    Esto viene a ser un aprendizaje colaborativo, que contribuye a la alfabetización de la informaciuón.
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    Peer learning is engaging, and researches say that people learns most effectively when they are interacting with each other. It creates this network of knowledge when you share and connect with people, it not only benefits the individual, but benefits everyone as a whole. It also relieves the pressure of University funding with teachers having to teach such a large class, which affects the quality of learning as well. With peer learning, students engage with one another, and will eventually find the correct answer. It is not independent learning, this is interdependent learning.
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    Thank you for your share. I think this is a great article that introduces the potential of peer learning in higher learning from the teacher's perspective. I agree that connected learning does a great job in promoting student's interactivity, creativity, motivation and interest in learning a particular topic with peers. In addition, peer learning provides learners with opportunities to collaborate and learn a subject together, which might maximize the productivity if used in a correct way. Peers and collaborative learners can do their own research separately, and meet together to discuss and express different opinions on the issue, which can inspire student's deep thinking. However, peer learning and collaborative learning is not always superior to individual work, or contributing to the learning result of every individual. Sometimes it might decrease the learning productivity if the group members or peer partners over reply on others in the group without doing much themselves, or if they didn't communicate well. Thus it's important to practice students learning ability and teacher's facilitating ability in peer learning or collaborative learning.
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This Is What Happens When A Kid Leaves Traditional Education - 4 views

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    "Logan Laplante is a 13 year-old boy who was taken out of the education system to be home schooled instead. Not only was he home schooled, but Logan had the ability to tailor his education to his interests and also his style of education, something traditional education does not offer." I realise this article (and the video on which the article is based) does not fall neatly into any category we've studied yet, though I hope many of you may find it as interesting and inspiring as I have. At core, this is about "hacking" the educational system. As Logan explains, his methods can be applied in mainstream schooling (or indeed for anyone interested in lifelong/lifewide education). There's also the element of "participatory culture" embedded in the production of this video: Logan is sharing his experiences, allowing others to comment and contribute so that he might learn as others are education from him.
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    This is a truly amazing talk, I was especially pleased to discover your post since I was just about to share a talk that speaks to many of the same issues! My shared video talks about how schools simply aren't made for boys - for many reasons - and what should be done to reengage them in education. (You can check it out here, if you're interested - https://groups.diigo.com/group/okmooc/content/gaming-could-the-ultimate-tools-to-re-engage-boys-in-education-12782090) The part about "writing about butterflies and rainbows" quite literally made me chuckle, here's why: (from my video) "Boy comes home from school, and he says, "I hate writing." "Why do you hate writing, son? What's wrong with writing?" "Now I have to write what she tells me to write." "Okay, what is she telling you to write?" "Poems. I have to write poems. And little moments in my life. I don't want to write that stuff." :) The boy then goes on to saying "I want to write about video games. I want to write about leveling-up. I want to write about this really interesting world. I want to write about a tornado that comes into our house and blows all the windows out and ruins all the furniture and kills everybody." ...which is one of the main points of "hackschooling" -writing through experiences & interests. Also, speaking from personal experience as someone who also left a diploma behind, I can confirm that leaving a rigid non-functional study environment for an open world of possibility can be the best thing you can ever do. All in all - thumbs up for sharing the talk!
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    Thanks for sharing - what an inspiring talk. Many of his lessons are just as valuable for adults, who often seem to lose any sense of creativity after settling in to their lives, careers, and relationships. FYI - my wife and I have done some limited homeschooling with one of our kids who really doesn't thrive in traditional school settings. I wish we could have done more, but at the very least I encourage each of our kids to explore other ways to learn to either supplement (or question) what they are learning in school. Traditional learning just isn't supportive of creative thinking and creative thinkers.
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Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources | for Open Educational Reso... - 6 views

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    Community Colleges for Open Education Resources I chose this resource since I work at a community college and The mission is expanding access to Education by promoting awareness and adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER). Over 250 colleges have joined the consortium and many more participate in our activities and use resources posted here. The Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER)is a joint effort by individual community colleges, regional and statewide consortia, the Open Courseware Consortium, the American Association for Community Colleges, the League for Innovation in the Community Colleges, and many other Educational partners to develop and use open Educational resources, open textbooks, and open courseware to expand access to higher Education and improve teaching and Education.
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    I am a member of this consortium and wanted to share it with others who work in community colleges.
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    Open education information and group resources
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    Open education information and group resources
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The Crisis in Higher Education | MIT Technology Review - 1 views

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    A hundred years ago, higher education seemed on the verge of a technological revolution. The spread of a powerful new communication network-the modern postal system-had made it possible for universities to distribute their lessons beyond the bounds of their campuses. Anyone with a mailbox could enroll in a class.
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    This article provides a clear overview of the evolution of higher education along with the rapid development of technology during the past 100 year, and raises the issue whether today's networked education model has posted threat to higher education. Today's the rapid development of Internet and social networks have changed the way we learn, access information and connect with others. The emergence and popularity of MOOCs and various social media have brought a new education model, connected education, which is largely used in university and college courses. It expands learners' opportunities of education, and brings them huge convenience to access information, share thoughts, and communicated with learners from world wide on the same topic. education in the current information age subverted the way we learn in traditional education models, and sometimes caused problems. But I think it's normal for a new thing to cause problems, but as long as we figure out ways to overcome the problems and best utilize the new education model and resource, it will bring us huge opportunities.
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A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Learning - 5 views

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    While we are talking about (open) education, let us look for the handbook. Part I, Chapter 7: "E-education - an introduction"
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    It is an essential document for educators and librarians. The Handbook focuses on issues of knowledge and learning and teaching and leading its readers to a mode of considering learning as revisiting learners' prior knowledge into the mode of thinking and understanding through the study of primary sources. After Biggs and Moore, the authors of the Handbook view students as individuals who actively construct their knowledge and learning as a process that involves a process of individual transformation. The document touches all the essential questions of learning including motivation and deep approach to studying. curriculum design, the use of technologies in learning opportunities and other.
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Maker Education and Experiential Education - 6 views

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    Places the popular concept of the makerspace within the theoretical context of experiential education.
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    Good infographics!
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    I have a 11-year old daughter, so a lot of the readings and activities we do in this course usually lead me to compare between how they apply to k-12 "fundamental" education and professional development. We are lucky in that some of her teachers are experimenting with flipped classroom and project-based education. However, as a parent on the sideline, sometimes I wonder about their activities. How do I or anyone evaluate an activity to know that it is "educational"? This article gives a great definition, "...an experience is educative if it lead to further growth, intellectually or morally..." Another quote I like a lot is "learner to take initiative, make decisions, and be accountable for the results."
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    Good article on the Maker Movement, and references to the thinking of John Dewey. I hadn't realized some of the Maker Movement extends back to the 1970's. I had the chance to meet Sylvia Libow Martinez a couple of years ago (of Invent to Learn - http://www.inventtolearn.com/) and got a deeper insight into the power of the Maker Movement, Maker Fairs, and how sharing knowledge and collaboration is producing some amazing things in the realm of 3D printing, wearable technology, and changing paradigms for education.
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The corridor of uncertainty: Open educational practice stimulates less used languages - 0 views

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    How can open educational practices empower less used and minority languages? - Webinar series (part of the European project LangOER) that aims at enhancing the teaching and education of less used languages through open educational resources and practices
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    How can open educational practices empower less used and minority languages? - Webinar series (part of the European project LangOER) that aims at enhancing the teaching and education of less used languages through open educational resources and practices
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Medical Education in the New Millennium - 3 views

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    A really interesting course (also from Stanford Online) that has just started and I believe will be of interest to many doing Open Knowledge! "This interdisciplinary course features talks from thought leaders and innovators from medical education, instructional design, cognitive science, online education, and emerging technology. Over the course of eleven weeks, we'll consider how to build educational experiences that address the unique education preferences of today's Millennial medical students and residents. As the volume of new medical knowledge outpaces our ability to organize and retain it, how might educators disrupt outdated practices through thoughtful use of technology and education design? How might MOOCs, social media, simulation and virtual reality change the face of medical education? How might we make education continuous, engaging, and scalable in the age of increasing clinical demands and limited work hours? Joining the conversation will be experts from all health care and education stakeholder domains, including patients, and students from nursing, medicine and engineering sciences."
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    You sold me and I signed up, this is exactly what I was looking for when I signed up for this course. Hoping to bring this into clinical research and improve the perceptions, understanding and participation to forward medical innovation.
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Developing world MOOCs: A curriculum view of the MOOC landscape - 21 views

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    "MOOCs offer opportunities but are also pose the danger of further exacerbating existing educational divisions and deepening the homogeneity of global knowledge systems."
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    in this article MOOC are considered as alternative for education in network society..I like the fact that MOOC's are coming to discussion edge http://digitalusers.wordpress.com/2014/06/13/the-digital-presidents-ultimate-challenge/
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    Very interesting! Thanks. "MOOCs and MOOC-type courses have added a new dimension to the educational landscape by strengthening the non-formal educational space and providing opportunities to experiment with the disaggregated components of the educational experience"
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    After watching the Willinsky video, this hit home even more. I think the value of quality education is extremely important, and creating a "global village" of education is still in its growing pains. Having a face-to-face instructor/professor/facilitator lets you ask the questions that pop to mind and being in a classroom setting allows an idea to flow and develop into other ideas. There are a lot of social media tools that are familiar to a lot of students living in a Western culture, but those social tools are not always available to developing countries; many do not have access to schools or even have a computer - as this article indicates, MOOCs are certainly a venue that opens education opportunities for those who do not have access to education in a formal environment, but may have access to the internet. What I particularly found interesting were the various MOOC categories - Gateway: MOOCs for prepping to get into higher education; Research showcase: promote an institute's research areas; Professional skills: MOOCs for those who need to "upskill" or specialize…and there are others. The main reason for taking this course was to improve my knowledge of what social media is out there (MOOCs are part of it), how it is being used, and how useful is this "new" media is within the publishing realm. It is a challenge.
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Hire Education: Mastery, Modularization, and the Workforce Revolution | Christensen Ins... - 0 views

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    "Who will attend to the skills gap and create stronger linkages to the workforce? This book illuminates the great disruptive potential of online competency- based education. Workforce training, competency-based education, and online education are clearly not new phenomena, but online competency-based education is revolutionary because it marks the critical convergence of multiple vectors: the right education model, the right technologies, the right customers, and the right business model."
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Right to Education : Situation around the world - 0 views

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    Education situation around the world.When we talk about open Education,we always focus on high level Education such as college or graduate Education.But, out of the U.S, such as Asia, Africa, there are many children who don't have chance to get better Education, eager to learn more to change their fate.So, I hope open Education can also concerning these edge people
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Servants of Power: Higher Education in an Era of Corporate Control - 9 views

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    Argues that increasing corporate control is undermining the foundational values of higher education.
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    Good article, thanks for sharing it. I think what trancends in this article is that the those who have power obviously want to maintain that position and therefore it is in their interest to lobby for a "bad", "uncreative" education system, so to say to deliberatly limit thought capacity. There are certainly many interesting aspects to what is written in this article, for example the part about Gramschis thoughts is directed on a discussion of social classes, and how those might lean right or left depending on their composition. But could it also be that the, so called, lower classes (i dont like that expression) are just not there to engage and participate in political discussion that draws the outlines of such things like the education system.
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    Here in Spain we have a similar evolution of higher education; private postgraduate private schools give masters that guarantee the access to top jobposts, but they are not focused on analysis, creativity and critical minds, but on pure business. What you need to be on your future job post is what you learn. Public institutions are still on air, but they are struggling with less and less public resources to survive. So I guess this is not only going on in USA.
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    Italy is going even worse...i'm an Adjunct Professor for maybe 1000 euro per year ... surviving by scholarships, call center mid term contracts, collaborations where i'm asked to pay for taxes the university should pay, all levels teaching.. I like "Some of the basic principles underlying effective pedagogy, such as small class size, individual attention and the importance of mentoring, are being sacrificed in order to increase head count, limit labor costs and create a one-size-fits-all educational experience." The problem is that universities are to make profits from fees (that's why they hire me instead of employing me) and offer any kind of courses, masters to increase their income! The problem is: how can we expect to increase the quality of education as far as decisions are taking by political, business, organizational sides instead of scientific and educational ones?
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80 Resources for Open Education Developers - 21 views

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    With these resources, you can create or participate in collaborative efforts to develop tools and methods for online education.
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    This is fantastic, an awesome resource, and an excellent starting point when developing open education resources!
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    A great resource for developing courses using open ed resources. Thank you!
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    Thank you for sharing this link! It not only embodies the spirit of the course and the diigo platform, but I am going to be greedy and bookmark it in my personal folder for use in my work as an Education Consultant.
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    Thanks for posting this! it is indeed good sources for helping and encouraging people to learn with open access. Especially for those who is new to this 'open access' thing, this resource will help them to find the one that meet their need.
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    thank you for these resources, we need this kind of initiative to improve and ease the access to education
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    Thanks for sharing! I look forward to discovering and participating in Open education platforms and systems and sharing and contributing my thoughts, findings, information to others.
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    This is so great! A list like this and the tools on it are the kinds of resources that do the most work, I think, towards multiplying access to education. I'm excited to explore all of these - thanks for sharing!
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    Thanks for sharing this rich resource. I echo my colleagues' enthusiasm of this initiative. It seems like a great starting place for collaborators with all different backgrounds to come, develop and explore OER's.
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    This is a very useful list. My favourite new resource from this list is LeMill. The tools section is a vast and diverse resource for a wide range of free apps and services.
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    Many Open Education Resources (OER) have been introduced by governments, universities, and individuals within the past few years. OERs provide teaching and Education materials that are freely available and offered online for anyone to use. Whether you're an instructor, student, or self-learner, you have access to full courses, modules, syllabi, lectures, assignments, quizzes, activities, games, simulations, and tools to create these components.
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    Thanks. An extensive list of resources. It may have been easier to use the list if it wasn't categorised only alphabetically but also further grouped into categories. It's still a valuable collection.
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Continuity Education in Emergency and Conflict Situations: The Case For Using Open, Dis... - 0 views

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    "Emergency and conflict in countries such as Syria, the Philippines, Sri Lanka and Afghanistan have made us more aware of the long-term serial disruption and psychosocial damage faced by people caught up in emergency and conflict areas. Open, distance and flexible learning (ODFL) has sometimes been employed in these regions to maintain a degree of continuity in learning. For the most part, however, this role has been ad hoc, short-term and often bearing limited relation to the psychosocial and learningal needs of the displaced or traumatised populations it serves."
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Extremely inspiring (and "crazy" in a good way!) talk about using video games to change... - 9 views

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    Dr Jane McGonigal (a professional game developer) talks about the time spent playing video games (which approximates to the span of human evolution), and that this time has to increase to make any major changes to the world. I have selected this resource partially in relation to week 3's Clarke's lecture (and others), which talks about using our idle time to do something meaningful - participate in citizen science games, for example. Dr McGonigal's talk very much illustrates this point - except that it talks about solving global issues through indirect games, e.g. a World Without Oil online game simulates a world in which you have to survive oil shortage. Creator's research shows, that people maintain the skills and habits they have taken up after playing this intense game, which include making better choices for our changing environment. The only difference here from actual citizen science games is that Dr McGonigal's games are fictional (rather than providing direct data / input for actual scientific research), however, they empower people to influence global change, which is the topic of the other lectures this week, especially Morozov's thoughts about the power of internet and connectiveness to create "revolutions". Although Morozov has taken up a rather critical view, suggesting only those who want it, take the best from the Internet, Dr McGonigal's ideas might be what bridges the two - taking games, which are integral part of many people's lives, especially in the younger generation, and turning them into real "life schools" may help more people get the idea and the essential skills to "fix" their environments. In all honesty, this is a video I would watch again and again, and recommend it to anyone who would listen (and that doesn't happen often for me).
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    Very interesting view about gaming in a digital world and gaming in a real world. How to balance both world is the challenge that we are all facing. One can see the advantage of computer gaming but also the disconnect with nature that over gaming can create.
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    A very interesting perspective. I took a course of Organisational Analysis offered in Coursera by Stanford University and, in the modules of "Learning Organisations" and "Organizational Culture" we reviewed this issue. Gamers usually develop different skills by playing online games as World of Warcraft, such as: communication, decision making, collaborative work, frustration tolerance and goals setting. This is because they practice, in an alternative world, many different real life situations. In addition, in clinical psychology are using virtual games to treat pacients and educate chilldrens. So, for that reasons, i think it is something really possible.
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    A thought-provoking viewpoint of gaming related to reality.Gamers can become empowered in the real world through skills learnt through gaming. Gaming is changing the look of education. 'Latest games are finally unlocking the key to making education more fun' by Emmanuel Felton. http://hechingerreport.org/content/latest-games-finally-unlocking-key-making-education-fun_17380/
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    Gamification for learning - using game elements - sounds very promising. Prior to the internet, technology, there were board games or hands on projects - all with the intent to engage and interact with each other. So it is no surprise to me given the appropriate design/project that students can learn and solve real world problems. Letting students choose their persona and role also allows them to make their own future and take ownership for how they want to participate. Just like the original promise of multimedia training that was purported to replace the traditional classroom events and enable getting the "best" teacher recorded for all to have the same experience...I believe it was then thought that the learning experience needs o be "blended". Different techniques - online, face to face, etc.. This is not my field of expertise so these are just personal opinions. If the online game approach can be combined with face to face and tactile/outdoor activities, aka a blended approach - I think that might be very useful. I do also believe that design solutions should be encouraging win win situations to reinforce collaboration and the feeling that all can succeed. One question I might have is how do you measure success in learning?
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    Gaming promoters unfortunately for me have a commercial agenda and its always difficult to make that balance of pure learning and commercialization aspect
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How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Business | W... - 4 views

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    This is an excellent article which explains how Sugata Mitra's teaching models helped to transform a failing school in Mexico. It's a story which completely changed my attitude to learning and learning and inspired me to discover as much as possible about cloud-based and student-centred learning.
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    Thanks for posting. I have heard of similar ideas from my girlfriend who works with learning disabled people, helping them make goals and follow through with them. The way the criticized traditional 'top down' eduction system is set-up, learning disabled people end up with the impression that they are failures and burdens. This goes beyond learning disabled people though, anyone who finds no inspiration for math, English and the sciences is bound to under perform at school, fail at the competitive aspect of it and get told their failures as a result, implicitly or explicitly. I also found that at design school when I realized that math and English were important for the projects I was working on I started to learn effectively and enjoy doing so. This is after failing my secondary learning (pre university in New Zealand). You say this changed your attitude towards cloud learning, have you done much else as a result?
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