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janetw_suiching

Open Data developments in Asia | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog - 1 views

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    This blog about Open Data Developments in Asia analyses the recent state of Open Data adopted in Asia and highlights some of the 11 Asian countries participants that attended the Open Knowledge Conference in Geneva in 2012. Of the 11 countries that attended the conference, the author of the post focuses on the East Asian and Pacific countries such as New Zealand, Australia, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar and discusses their state and role in Openness. The author does a good job at providing statistics of the different countries in terms of the Worldbank Knowledge Economy Index (KEI), which analyzes the economic rankings of countries. The author then compares economic rank to that of openness, stating that countries low on the economic rank contribute little to no open data within their own countries or externally to other countries. Next, the author talks about the overall internet penetration in Asia as being only 27.5 percent and in that statistic, there is still a wide gap between North and South East Asia in terms of internet use and information distribution and acquisition from citizens and others. Moreover, the author continues to compare how many social, economical, political and cultural influence information distribution, contribution and acquisition in Asia countries. Openness is growing in the more developed Asian countries, but openness is limited, or even nonexistent, in developing (authoritative) countries. After reading this article, I've had a greater understanding of the current state of Open Data in Asia an the influences that contribute to enabling Openness. What I expected from the blog post or something that would've made the post even better could be some examples or projects of Openness or Open Data in Asia.
janetw_suiching

Information Geographies - 1 views

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    Many interesting charts and data of the global internet use, access, and contributions
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    Cool!! It's so valuable to see behind the scenes of a lot of the open (or closed) tools we use. These images, maps, and infographics are really neat and use a lot of data that probably gets forgotten about in a lot of discussions. Thanks for posting!
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    Atlas, publications, charts and tables of global information and internet geographies and impacts on information access, information production and information distribution, done over a four year period by Oxford Information Institute. Findings, data, and publication will be published in Open Access formats and platforms. The website is simple but contains lots of information relevant to the topics in Stanford. There are links to external related publications about information geography, access, distribution and production. Very good website. Some limitations include: bias from the two developers and producers as well as institution itself, unknown (not identified) contributors and sponsors.
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    A very valuable collection demonstrating how economic, political, cultural and linguistic ties impact the flow of knowledge is and information. Of course, such charts do little to explain, why this happens and where a more even distribution of knowledge is desirable. Also, the data that lies behind the visualisations is not always open. Especially vauable are the links to the data collections that are accessible.
c maggard

additional revenue streams for newspapers - 0 views

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    While not exactly on topic, and newspapers are not generally considered Scholarly publishers, they do engage with the public, and frequently act as a liaison between journals/researchers and the public. In the past ten years or so, people have gotten used to accessing, for free, newspapers and television reports as a way to inform themselves. While this is good for the individual, it is not so good for the publisher. Many traditional news outlets have been struggling to find a way to generate revenue in a way that neither smacks of consumerism, nor excludes the average citizen from participating. IN the UK, the liberal-leaning newspaper The Guardian has begun selling 'memberships', and hosting events ranging from lectures to classes on things as diverse as photography and creative writing.
suetaitlen

A very social affair | Laboratory News - 0 views

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    A short overview on how social media influenced on scientific publishing.
alibabas

Open Science - 0 views

Another second newly discovered resources i found with reference to : Open Science Link is : http://www.opensciencegrid.org/

OpenScience open access Knowledge Module6 Module 6 Data Access openknowledge open learningopen science MOOC

started by alibabas on 31 Oct 14 no follow-up yet
alibabas

Open Science, Data Access - 0 views

A newly discovered resources i found with reference to : Open Science Link is : http://www.opensciencedirectory.net/

OpenScience open access Knowledge Module6 Data Access Module 6 open science MOOC

started by alibabas on 31 Oct 14 no follow-up yet
Ignoramus OKMOOC

Open science, data, access - 3 views

The second resource references the openscience working groups oft the Open Cloud Consortium (OCC), which is a not for profit that manages and operates cloud computing infrastructure for medium to l...

science data access open access Knowledge Open module6 Module 6 publishing accesss

Ignoramus OKMOOC

Open Innovation - The Good, the bad and the uncertainties - 0 views

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    Eliza Laur CORAS and Adrian Tumitru TANTAU elaborate on the principles of open innovation. Students experienced in open learning might be better suited in a business world, where innovation has changed from being done in a closed shop, to being fostered by a free - albeit carefully managed - in- and outflow of information
davidivancasta

datos.gob.mx - 0 views

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    En datos.gob.mx puedes descargar y utilizar libremente datos abiertos que el Gobierno de la República genera y recolecta.
Sophie Lafayette

Medical Education in the New Millennium - 3 views

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    A really interesting course (also from Stanford Online) that has just started and I believe will be of interest to many doing Open Knowledge! "This interdisciplinary course features talks from thought leaders and innovators from medical education, instructional design, cognitive science, online learning, and emerging technology. Over the course of eleven weeks, we'll consider how to build educational experiences that address the unique learning preferences of today's Millennial medical students and residents. As the volume of new medical knowledge outpaces our ability to organize and retain it, how might educators disrupt outdated practices through thoughtful use of technology and learning design? How might MOOCs, social media, simulation and virtual reality change the face of medical education? How might we make learning continuous, engaging, and scalable in the age of increasing clinical demands and limited work hours? Joining the conversation will be experts from all health care and education stakeholder domains, including patients, and students from nursing, medicine and engineering sciences."
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    You sold me and I signed up, this is exactly what I was looking for when I signed up for this course. Hoping to bring this into clinical research and improve the perceptions, understanding and participation to forward medical innovation.
Alefiyah Shikari

OPEN DATA COMMONS, A LICENSE FOR OPEN DATA - 3 views

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    An interesting article arguing for the creation of open licenses for data. They make the point that the use of creative commons licenses is mistaken as these are designed for creative work not data or data bases. Unfortunately the argument - which is repeated several times - is not very thoroughly presented. The Talis Community License is mentioned as a possible alternative. The paper dates from 2008 and is thus - apart from the forceful argument for open licenses as the more viable alternative to the public domain - primarily of historical interest. Much progress has been made in the field with Open Data Commons Licenses now being an accepted standard as well as well as country specific licenses such as Open Government License UK, Open Government License Canada or Data License Germany (cf. http://opendefinition.org/licenses/).
Ad Huikeshoven

How We Use Social Media for Informal Learning - 2 views

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    From Topic: https://groups.diigo.com/group/okmooc/content/community-manager-12884327 By: https://www.diigo.com/profile/cvpido Vendors talk about social learning like its something revolutionary, but I'm here to tell you its not. Informal learning is an everyday thing. Social media tools are just another platform we use to learn from each-other and find information serendipitously.
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    Ad Huikeshoven , I do agree with you. There is nothing new with social learning. In the african context,that was the way of learning through informal gatherings, story tellings around fire or while drinking some traditional beer. Otherwise we are just acknowledging that, there is plenty to learn from each other and through each other. The wheel can not be reinvented for sure.
cvpido

COMMUNITY MANAGER - 3 views

in the age of communities of practices online (seek>sense>share>) an emerging role could be this one: http://www.bottomlineperformance.com/how-we-use-social-media-for-informal-learning/

knowledge module6 community practice share

started by cvpido on 11 Oct 14 no follow-up yet
cvpido

Cheating to Learn: How a UCLA professor gamed a game theory midterm - 3 views

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    About cheating at UCLA as a 'natural' open way of learning
Olga Huertas

Open Access: El candadito abierto a la ciencia - 1 views

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    ¿Qué es eso de publicar en abierto?, pues ni mas ni menos es un modelo de difusión de la ciencia que supone en última instancia un cambio radical en el funcionamiento de la comunicación científica.
Olga Huertas

Who's Afraid of Peer Review? - 3 views

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    Of the 255 papers that underwent the entire editing process to acceptance or rejection, about 60% of the final decisions occurred with no sign of peer review. For rejections, that's good news: It means that the journal's quality control was high enough that the editor examined the paper and declined it rather than send it out for review.
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    This article is certainly controversial, and I believe in some way did a service to the Open Access community by highlighting the practice of predatory journals. However, the irony of Bohannon's article, being an example of the kind of "bad science" he describes in his own article is inescapable. First, there is no randomization of his "experimental group", and there is no control group; second, there was elimination of non-responders; third, there was no application of the intention to treat principle in the analysis; and finally there were no inferential statistics and no references! Using his own standard, there is nothing that can be concluded from his study. For the criticism regarding Bohannon's targeting of OA journals exclusively, it is important to note that this experiment has been done before with 'traditional' journals as well- and many of them failed the test of peer review. http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2014/02/27/how_nonsense_papers_ended_up_in_respected_scientific_journals.html
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    I think Bohannens "study" should be considered more "investigative journalism" than scientific study. While it may have some flaws if held against the standards of a scientific study, as a journalistic piece it goes a long way to justify its central accusation that there are predatory open access journals. He does not claim that there are no or evwen less predatory journals in the tradional sector (although it seems reasonable to believe that it might seem easier to predatory publishers to dupe unsuspecting scientists rather than subscription paying librarians). It demonstrates that open access is not a cure for all the problems besetting acacemic publishing. I think more deeply about it, it shows that author fees for publication may create a buisiness model just as open to abouse as the traditional subscription system. One answer might be to make the peer-review process more transparent, i.e. name the reviewers But that of course has other drawbacks.
Olga Huertas

¿Quién teme a la revisión por pares? Demos un voto de confianza al sistema - 1 views

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    Recientemente ha armado bastante revuelo la publicación de un artículo en la famosa revista Science Magazine bajo el título "¿Quién teme a la revisión por pares? Un artículo trampa elaborado por Science descubre escaso o nulo rigor en muchas revistas de acceso abierto". En este "estudio" (no sé muy bien cómo llamarlo), el periodista John...
Olga Huertas

Scientific Dissemination using Open Access - 0 views

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    Open Access Resources aims to remove constraints in access to articles and knowledge for academic-intellectual world community, particularly in the developing countries. Scientists from these countries still have trouble posting their works due to limitations of network access, institutional economic difficulties and lack of information about solutions available Open Access. It is expected that the Open Access increase understanding of educational and research opportunities to unite the world.
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    You could be interested in this too: http://sdu.ictp.it/index.html SDu is developing also a videocapture integrated system so that for a small investment lessons can be recorded and shared online http://www.openeya.org/ ...even infrastructures must be open....
Olga Huertas

Impacto e implicación de los autores en el acceso abierto a la investigación ... - 0 views

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    estudio sobre el acceso abierto, su generalización y su impacto en el caso de la investigación en Documentación en España.
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