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Ignoramus OKMOOC

Introduction to Openness in Education - 5 views

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    An online course by David Wiley covering a wide range of topics within open education and open knowledge in the wider sense.
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    Opened in a broader sense knowledge and a broad range of topics is something wonderful for those wanting to learn more and more from anywhere in the world!
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    Una manera diferente de ver la Educación, muy interesante.
Ignoramus OKMOOC

Open Innovation - The Good, the bad and the uncertainties - 0 views

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    Eliza Laur CORAS and Adrian Tumitru TANTAU elaborate on the principles of open innovation. Students experienced in open learning might be better suited in a business world, where innovation has changed from being done in a closed shop, to being fostered by a free - albeit carefully managed - in- and outflow of information
Kevin Stranack

How Old School Publishers Can Win In The Digital Age - 1 views

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    "Like many millennials today, Yale classmates Henry Luce and Briton Hadden left their jobs to create a startup. They found newspapers dry, longwinded and boring and thought they could do better by presenting stories in a faster paced, more personality centered format. In 1923 they launched Time magazine and it became a runaway success."
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    "The greatest challenge for publishers today is to create new business models. Unfortunately, most haven't even begun the process due to misplaced nostalgia for distribution revenue. In that sense, paywalls represent the greatest threat to old-line publishers."
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    And also due to the inherent feature of every human being of being resistant to changes. And all of that without taking into account some economical interests.
Kim Baker

The Economics of Access to Literature and Information - 10 views

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    I presented this paper to a conference in South Africa in 2005, and it was described as "too radical" by the top leaders in libraries in South Africa who attended. :) So am rather happy that my vague perceptions and musings about the emerging trends have been vindicated today. "This paper will focus on another aspect that is integrally linked to the ability to access literature and information - that of cost and economics. Both the broader macroeconomic context and the more focused microeconomic (South African) environment will be referred to. We will examine the assumption that the economic development of a nation is linked to the ability to access information and test whether this is a valid assumption. From there, we will take a brief look at the issue of the cost of books, specifically in South Africa. The advent of the electronic revolution and the many paradigm shifts that the Internet and electronic media have initiated and the effects on the publishing industry, will be outlined. We will explore the "information as commodity" paradigm and briefly look at the related Copyright and Intellectual Property developments before weaving these seemingly disparate threads together to form a picture of innovative solutions that have arisen in response to the information access crisis in South Africa. These solutions have arisen from the popular notion that information should be freely available for societal good, rather than commodified. Finally, we will ponder the effect that these solutions may have on the traditional book publishing industry in South Africa."
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    Very interesting and argumentative paper. Thank you!
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    You are welcome, and thank you for the comment. :)
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    It is very good thank you
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    Excellent - on top of the game. It`s exactly what`s happening all over the world. Limit access, knowledge and perspective and control thought.
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    Congratulations Kim, on a well-written paper, which I find particularly relevant. Thank you for sharing.
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    Thank you all, very much, it is quite a new experience for me to have the paper well received. :)
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    Thank you for sharing this. I really appreciated the non-North American context. I grew up in the States, and am working on my Master's degree in Canada, so it's really easy to get caught up in always looking at these issues from the North American point of view. Seeing papers like this really help to confirm how global these issues are, and cement their importance in my mind.
Kevin Stranack

A Scalable and Sustainable Approach to Open Access (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu - 1 views

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    "Funded by tertiary institutions rather than individual researchers, this new model seeks to provide open access not just to traditional academic publications but to all forms of scholarly output."
Sophie Lafayette

Giving Knowledge for Free: The Emergence of Open Educational Resources - 5 views

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    This report addresses four main questions: * How can sustainable cost/benefit models for OER initiatives be developed? * What are the intellectual property rights issues linked to OER initiatives? * What are the incentives and barriers for universities and faculty staff to deliver their materials to OER initiatives? * How can access and usefulness for the users of OER initiatives be improved? This is part of an OECD series of reports looking at the impact of Open Knowledge on education systems and learning
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    Hi Matt, Thanks for sharing this OECD report from the year 2007. The OECD is really forward looking. One sentence strikes me: "Wikipedia has two employees and well over a million articles in multiple languages." Yes, that was true, back in the year 2007.
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    A very interesting paper that discusses issues around OER, as well as some topics already covered in the course is, "Giving Knowledge for Free: The Emergence of Open Educational Resources" (Centre for Educational Research and Innovation, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development). The paper highlights some of the barriers, sustainability issues, and how to improve access and usefulness of open educational resources. I found the paper very comprehensive, with many additional resources. While published in 2007, when conversations around OER were fairly new, many of the points they raise are still in discussion and relevant.
Jacynthe Touchette

Together we are stronger: charities join forces to support open access (UK) - 2 views

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    A great news, especially for the "immediately" aspect! "A consortium of six leading UK medical research charities will support the costs of making research articles from their funded research immediately and freely openly available to scientists, patients, and donors alike, through the recently announced joint Charity Open Access Fund."
Kevin Stranack

Two Bits: The Cultural Significance of Free Software - 1 views

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    Christopher Kelty has written a book on the cultural importance of open source software and made it freely available under a CC license. It looks at free software from both a technical and social perspective, allowing for greater insights into its significance for today and for tomorrow.
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    This is a very interesting and thought provoking ebook. Not only does it provide a helpful historical view of how free software came to be, but it posits the impact of such a phenomenon on industry and culture. I particularity liked the view that the pervasiveness of free software - thanks to the Internet - is such that free software itself is instigating much change beyond its original perceived sphere of influence, being software applications. A good read if open source software, free software and impacts on culture interests you.
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