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Kevin Stranack

A New Digital Divide? - NZ Commons - 0 views

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    "So why do we have an emerging digital divide in society where one group has easy and instant access to new research often funded out of the public purse yet others face significant costs, delays or barriers to accessing knowledge?" "In the past, one might have expected society's 'critics and consciences' to be located in universities. Now many of these voices, including some who have retired, are outside these institutions."
Kevin Stranack

Open Access Scientific Publishing and the Developing World by Jorge L. Contreras :: SSRN - 1 views

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    "Responding to rapid and steep increases in the cost of scientific journals, a growing number of scholars and librarians have advocated "open access" (OA) to the scientific literature. OA publishing models are having a significant impact on the dissemination of scientific information. Despite the success of these initiatives, their impact on researchers in the developing world is uncertain. This article analyses major OA approaches adopted in the industrialized world (so-called Green OA, Gold OA, and OA mandates, as well as non-OA information philanthropy) as they relate to the consumption and production of research in the developing world. The article concludes that while the consumption of scientific literature by developing world researchers is likely to be significantly enhanced through such programs, promoting the production of research in the developing world requires additional measures. These could include the introduction of better South-focused journal indexing systems that identify high-quality journals published in the developing world, coupled with the adjustment of academic norms to reward publication in such journals. Financial models must also be developed to decrease the reliance by institutions in the developing world on information philanthropy and to level the playing field between OA journals in industrialized and developing countries."
Kevin Stranack

Reactionary Rhetoric Against Open Access Publishing | Bivens-Tatum | tripleC: Communica... - 0 views

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    "In 2013, Jeffrey Beall published an attack on the open-access scholarship movement in tripleC: "The Open-Access Movement Is Not Really About Open Access". This article examines the claims and arguments of that contribution. Beall's article makes broad generalizations about open-access advocates with very little supporting evidence, but his rhetoric provides good examples of what Albert O. Hirschman called the "rhetoric of reaction". Specifically, it provides examples of the perversity thesis, the futility thesis, and the jeopardy thesis in action. While the main argument is both unsound and invalid, it does show a rare example of reactionary rhetoric from a librarian."
bmierzejewska

Did He Just Say That?! The Perils of Video Recording the Conference Presentation | The ... - 1 views

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    "implying that publishers have willfully disregarded their ethical responsibilities over profits: And my theory is that academic publishing has drifted so far from its original idealistic roots with scientists taking care of the whole last step in the scientific process, from experiment to sharing the news about it, [that] in this world of the Internet and expensive publishing processes, basically a cottage industry grew up that has now grown into a massive multi-billion dollar industry that has become estranged from the ideals, that were probably naïve to begin with. But you can be idealistic and do a good job and make a profit. That is not mutually exclusive."
Kevin Stranack

The Morality of Open Access vs Increasing Diversity | - 4 views

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    "Larger than the Open Access warz, I feel that I have a moral responsibility to increase the access to science careers for women and minorities. I can't hold the door open for those folks unless I am standing on the other side of it. That means getting tenure and if someone tells me that I can get closer to those goals by forgoing Open Access for a round or two, I'm going to do it."
Kevin Stranack

Taylor & Francis Online :: 2014 open access survey - 0 views

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    "Taylor & Francis carried out a worldwide survey, with the aim of exploring journal authors' views on open access. Having previously conducted a survey on open access in 2013, we have been able to see how authors' opinions have developed, and whether the discussion and debate on open access has helped to inform and shape views. With responses to both the 2013 and 2014 survey given side-by-side, you can easily see how attitudes have changed. Alongside this, the 2014 survey explores many new areas and gives a fascinating insight into authors' current perceptions of open access."
Kevin Stranack

OLH Overlay Journals | Open Library of Humanities - 0 views

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    "An overlay journal performs all the activities of a scholarly journal and relies on structural links with one or more archives or repositories to perform its activities."
Kevin Stranack

Monograph Publishing Pilot | Open Library of Humanities - 2 views

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    "building a low cost, sustainable, Open Access future for the humanities."
Kevin Stranack

A Scalable and Sustainable Approach to Open Access Publishing and Archiving for Humanit... - 2 views

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    A plan to convert traditional subscription publication formats, including society-published journals and books or monographs, to OA, based on an annual or multi-year payment made by every institution of higher education, no matter what its size or classification, and by any institution that benefits from the research that is generated by those within the academy.
Kevin Stranack

How it works - Knowledge Unlatched - 5 views

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    The Knowledge Unlatched model depends on many libraries from around the world sharing the payment of a single Title Fee to a publisher, in return for a book being made available on a Creative Commons licence via OAPEN and HathiTrust as a fully downloadable PDF.
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    This is a great slide show. Sums it all up. Thanks. I may pass this on to my collection development manager.
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    Great concept! This goes to show that Open Knowledge does not equate to free and giveaway. I love the blend of effectively using a crowd-funding model through libraries to ensure appropriate fees are paid to cover costs and compensate authors and publishers to enable open access under a CC license across a global library network. It would be interesting to see the follow up to this. I would think this approach would be useful for school libraries in a district or region to use this approach and effectively share the resources.
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    Interesting take on what will happen to the future of libraries and how information will be published and sold. It's important to realize that nothing comes free and that we should promote a business model that benefits content-producers as well as consumers.
Kevin Stranack

Universities 'get poor value' from academic journal-publishing firms | Science | thegua... - 4 views

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    Compares the cost of articles from society and non-profit publishers to those of the major commercial publishers.
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    An extremely powerful piece of research. I find it fascinating that the researchers were able to use US Freedom of Information Act requests to uncover the licensing costs. As a librarian, it is extremely frustrating to be bound by non-disclosure agreements when it comes to our subscriptions.
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    Its crazy. The numbers (of profit and control) for the publishing companies is astronomical!
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    Universities have received a poor deal from the system of private, subscription-based access to knowledge production since the port WW2 commercialization of the scientific publishing industry. It is absurd that the university or research funder supplies the content (the research), pays for the authoring (the time of the researcher writing the article), and provides and pays for the time of peer reviewers and academic editors. In addition, it often pays page charges or formatting charges to publishers. It then cedes copyright and finally buys back its own research at prices that have escalated at four times the rate of inflation in the past decade and a half! Considering most of this research is conducted using public funds, it becomes a moral argument when public resources are used once again to purchase access to the outputs of this research. The commercial model of disseminating research does not obey the rules of supply and demand. A relatively small number of 'core' journals occupy monopoly positions, in that university libraries have to subscribe to access their content, whatever the cost, because these journals have been established as 'must-have' resources. While the practice of 'bundling' offers the advantage of bulk pricing, it reduces room for choice, as bundles consume large chunks of library budgets, making it difficult to subscribe to smaller, individual titles. In addition, the inflexibility of indexing systems makes it difficult for new journals to establish themselves; thus compromising the potential for smaller niche subjects and newer interdisciplinary areas. Thankfully the global inequalities engendered by the commercialization of scholarly publishing are being challenged by open access.
Kevin Stranack

Open and Shut?: Open Access in India: Q&A with Subbiah Arunachalam - 0 views

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    Another good interview by Richard Poynder, with Indian OA advocate, Subbiah Arunachalam. Focuses on the challenges faced by Indian scholars and next steps.
monde3297

OPEN AND CLOSED - 30 views

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    An alternative perspective on "openness".
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    Beware of "openwash". Whenever a term becomes so popular, it is important to clarify the definition and scope of the author/speaker/presenter.
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    An alternative opinion on openness, I agree. Openness may evoke different feelings to people who have the "closed" experience. It may be also people's disbelief in the buzz-words and buzz-trends which come and go.
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    I agree with the danger of Openness. Not everything should have open access. What happens with the pages that show people how to make guns or bombs? I think certain pages should not only be dismissed but also closed.
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    This is interesting. Technology is changing so fast! Already implications about 3D printing is in the news!!
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    So true ibudule. Is 'openness' to become another catch-prase and trend as 'green', 'robust debate', 'politically correct' terms for almost anything? The deeper significance of the concept can be undermined by it becoming the last trendy issue which is applied to almost anything and everything.
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    So true, not everything should be open, but it is getting hard in our world, where everyone addicted to technologies. Technological dependence is becoming a huge issue. For example, leaked Snapchat images are all over the internet, and 50% of users are teen in the age of 13 to 17 years old. And nowadays, most of pics aren't images of dogs, cats or weekend dinner, they are images of naked people. If its open, then there is no privacy.
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    I actually remember reading this article last year. It's quite frightening how these new methods of production have the potential to do a great deal of harm. Personally, I believe such "openness" can lead to subversion but that the benefits outweigh the risks.
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    Morozov is right to bash "openwashing". But he is wrong in his Statement on "open-source". He writes "While Popper's openness is primarily about politics and a free flow of ideas, open-source is about cooperation, innovation and Efficiency" - well if we look at the core and origin of "open source", we have to look at "free Software" and its definition given by the "Inventor" of "free and open source Software", Richard Stallman. And we will see, that Stallman has a robust and transparent agenda of "free flow of ideas", very liberal, very Popper-like. So "free Software" is the wrong example for open-washing, because it came from "freedom" first. For more, see https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-sw.html
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    The jury is still out there and only time will tell.
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    The argument will be with us for a very long time. I think this is based on the side of the fence that one is sitting on. It is just like a case of what came first a chicken or an egg. The fact is Open has place to occupy in our learning space. The jury is still out there.
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    Thanks for sharing this well presented write up. Big question put forth is are we really getting the outcomes expected from the open society. Open vs. quality is a big issue. At times restricting access helps a great deal.
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