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MiamiOH OARS

BLM Reno Nevada Curatorial Program - 0 views

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    The BLM is interested in partnering with a recipient to expand collections facilities and complete tasks necessary with DOI regulations and standards of best practice to become a federal repository for archaeological material.
MiamiOH OARS

Cultural Anthropology Program - Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants - 0 views

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    The primary objective of the Cultural Anthropology Program is tosupport basic scientific research on the causes, consequences, andcomplexities of human social and cultural variability. Anthropological research spans a wide gamut, and contemporary cultural anthropology is an arena in which diverse research traditions and methodologies are valid. Recognizing the breadth ofthe field's contributions to science, the Cultural Anthropology Program welcomes proposals for empirically grounded, theoreticallyengaged, and methodologically sophisticated research in allsub-fields of cultural anthropology. Because the National ScienceFoundation's mandate is to support basic research, the NSF CulturalAnthropology Program does not fund research that takes as itsprimary goal improved clinical practice or applied policy. A proposal that uses anthropological methods to understand a social problem but does not propose to make a theory-testing and/or theory expanding contribution to anthropology will be returned without review. Program research priorities include, but are not limited to, research thatincreases our understanding of:
    • Socio-cultural drivers of critical anthropogenic processes such asdeforestation, desertification, land cover change, urbanization,and poverty
    • Resilience and robustness of socio-cultural systems
    • Conflict, cooperation, and altruism
    • Economy, culture, migration, and globalization
    • Variability and change in kinship and family norms and practices
    • Cultural and social drivers of health outcomes and disease transmission
    • Social regulation, governmentality, and violence
    • Origins of complexity in socio-cultural systems
    • Language and culture: orality and literacy, sociolinguistics, andcognition
    • Human variation through empirically grounded ethnographicdescriptions
MiamiOH OARS

Arch - Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Awards - 0 views

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    The Archaeology Program supports anthropologically relevant archaeological research. This means that the value of the proposed research can be justified within an anthropological context. The Program sets no priorities by either geographic region or time period. It also has no priorities in regard to theoretical orientation or question and it is the responsibility of the applicant to explain convincingly why these are significant and have the potential to contribute to anthropological knowledge. While the Program, in order to encourage innovative research, neither limits nor defines specific categories of research type, most applications either request funds for field research and/or the analysis of archaeological material through multiple approaches. The Program also supports methodological projects which develop analytic techniques of potential archaeological value.
MiamiOH OARS

Biological Anthropology - 0 views

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    The Physical Anthropology Program supports basic research in areas related to human evolution and contemporary human biological variation. Research areas supported by the program include, but are not limited to, human genetic variation, human adaptation, human osteology and bone biology, human and nonhuman primate paleontology, functional anatomy, and primate socioecology. Grants supported in these areas are united by an underlying evolutionary framework, and often a consideration of adaptation as a central theoretical theme. Many proposals also have a biocultural orientation. The program frequently serves as a bridge within NSF between the social and behavioral sciences and the natural and physical sciences, and proposals are commonly jointly reviewed and funded with other programs.For more information about the Crosscutting Research and Training Opportunities, please visit the Cross-Directorate Activities webpage. Here, you will find a brief synopsis about each program, as well as links guiding you to the appropriate Program Solicitations.Also, for more information on the Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grants please visit the Physical Anthropology specific page.Under NSF's data sharing policy, the Foundation expects investigators to share with other researchers, at no more than incremental cost and within a reasonable time, the data, samples, physical collections, and other supporting materials created or gathered in the course of the work. To implement that policy in ways appropriate to Physical Anthropology and Archaeology, beginning July 1, 2005 these Programs will require that all proposals include a one-page detailed description of the applicant's data access plan in the "Supplementary Documents" section. This page will be in addition to the standard 15-page project description. Applications lacking this statement will not be reviewed. The Programs realize that individual cases may differ widely and recognize that any absolute timeline or rigid set of rule
MiamiOH OARS

Archaeology and Archaeometry - 0 views

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    The Archaeology Program provides support for anthropologically relevant archaeological research at both a "senior" and doctoral dissertation level. It also funds anthropologically significant archaeometric research and high risk exploratory research proposals. For more information about multi-disciplinary research and training opportunities, please visit the SBE Office of Multidisciplinary Activities (SMA) web site. Also, for more information on the Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grants, please visit the Archaeology specific page.
MiamiOH OARS

Media Projects - 0 views

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    NEH's Division of Public Programs supports activities that engage millions of Americans in understanding significant humanities works and ideas. At the center of every NEH-funded public humanities project is a core set of humanities ideas developed by scholars, matched to imaginative formats that bring those ideas to life for people of all ages and all walks of life. Projects must be analytical and deeply grounded in humanities scholarship in a discipline such as history, religion, anthropology, jurisprudence, or art history. NEH is a national funding agency, so the projects we support must demonstrate the potential to attract a broad, general audience. We welcome humanities projects tailored to particular groups, such as families, youth (including K-12 students), teachers, seniors, at-risk communities, and veterans, but they should also strive to cultivate a more inclusive audience. Media Projects grants support the following formats: * film and television projects; and * radio projects. Film and television projects may be single programs or a series addressing significant figures, events, or ideas. Programs must be intended for national distribution. The Division of Public Programs welcomes projects ranging in length from short-form to broadcast-length video. Radio projects may involve single programs, limited series, or segments within an ongoing program. They may also develop new humanities content to augment existing radio programming or add greater historical background or humanities analysis to the subjects of existing programs. They may be intended for regional or national distribution.
MiamiOH OARS

Research Grants - The Leakey Foundation - 0 views

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    Research Grants are awarded twice annually (in May and December) and constitute the majority of the Foundation's grant program. The Foundation funds research related specifically to human origins.
MiamiOH OARS

Cultural Anthroplogy - 0 views

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    The Cultural Anthropology Program supports basic scientific research about the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability. Cultural anthropologists analyze human social and cultural behavior holistically. This integrated approach makes anthropology a valuable research tool for understanding the modern world. Because cultural patterns are emergent over time and space, there is no single natural scale for ethnographic and ethnological analysis. In some cases, cultural patterns may emerge from the collective behavior of large ensembles of smaller scale units; in others, they may be imposed by larger scale constraints. The origins of social and cultural variability may be remote from the scale at which they are observed. Therefore, research may target any appropriate scale or scales from local to regional to global. The Program encourages innovative research that contributes to building spatially and temporally specific theory that extends understanding beyond individual case studies.The Cultural Anthropology Program accepts proposals for a variety of project types: Senior Research proposals (that is, research proposals from scholars with PhDs or equivalent degree); proposals for Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants; Cultural Anthropology Scholars awards (for research-related, post-PhD training); and CAREER proposals. The Program will also consider proposals for workshops and training programs, as well as supplements to current awards to support Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) and Research Experience for Graduate Studies (REG). Research in all sub-fields of cultural anthropology is eligible. Successful proposals are characterized by clear research questions and propositions that will be put to the test through meticulous attention to research design, data collection, and analysis.For more details about the various funding opportunities within the Cultural Anthropology Program, please consult the Cultural Ant
MiamiOH OARS

Hazard Mitigation and Structural Engineering - 0 views

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    The Hazard Mitigation and Structural Engineering (HMSE) program supports fundamental research to mitigate impacts of natural and anthropogenic hazards on civil infrastructure and to advance the reliability, resiliency, and sustainability of buildings and other structures. Hazards considered within the program include earthquake, tsunami, hurricane, tornado and other loads, as well as explosive and impact loading. Resiliency of buildings and other structures include structural and non-structural systems that, in totality, permit continued occupation or operation in case of an impact by a hazard. Research is encouraged that integrates structural and architectural engineering advances with discoveries in other science and engineering fields, such as earth and atmospheric sciences, material science, mechanics of materials, sensor technology, high performance computational modeling and simulation, dynamic system and control, and economics. The program seeks to fund transformative and cost-effective innovations for hazard mitigation of both new and rehabilitated buildings and other structures. Research in structural and architectural engineering is encouraged that extends beyond mature or current construction materials into investigations of smart and sustainable materials and technologies, and considers the structures in their entirety. In addition, the program funds research on structural health monitoring that goes beyond data acquisition to include the holistic system, integrating condition assessment and decision making tools to improve structural performance
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