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Matti Narkia

Vitamin K2: An update - Heart Scan Resource Center - Track Your Plaque - 0 views

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    Deficiency of K2 in both mice and humans is associated with coronary calcification; low vitamin K2 levels are associated with increased activity of Gla matrix protein, an enzyme that causes calcium deposition in artery walls. People who take warfarin (Coumadin®), a potent blocker of vitamin K2, experience more arterial and heart valve calcification.

    The 2004 Rotterdam Heart Study was the experience that really brought this concept closer to our interests. This well-conducted study of 4800 Dutch demonstrated an association of vitamin K2 intake with 57% reduction in cardiovascular events and lesser degrees of aortic calcification (another surrogate for atherosclerosis). Benefit appeared to be associated with a daily K2 intake of 32.7 micrograms per day (Geleijnse JM et al 2004). An important corollary of this study is that it suggests that a vitamin K2-mediated reduction in coronary calcification is accompanied by reduced likelihood of heart attack and other events.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin K2: An emerging story - Heart Scan Resource Center - Track Your Plaque - 1 views

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    Research has uncovered the fact that vitamin K also plays a crucial role in maintaining bone health. It was found that the amount of vitamin K required to halt bone absorption leading to osteoporosis requires much greater intakes than that required for blood clot regulation. Further, it appears that bone and vascular tissue (like coronary arteries) maintain a preference for a different form of vitamin K than that required for blood clotting regulation. Rather than vitamin K1 needed for clotting, vitamin K2 is the form preferred by bones and arteries (Schurgers LJ et al 2001). It appears that much of the information generated over the years for vitamin K focused on the K1 form, ignoring the K2 form necessary for bone and vascular health.

    Normal deposition of calcium occurs only in bone and in teeth. Abnormal deposition of calcium in the body occurs in three places: the inner lining of the arteries of the body (the intima) that causes atherosclerotic plaque; the muscle layer of arteries ("medial calcification"); and heart valves. K2 appears to be the form of vitamin K responsible for controlling these phenomena.
Matti Narkia

Blood -- Regression of warfarin-induced medial elastocalcinosis by high intake of vitam... - 0 views

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    Regression of warfarin-induced medial elastocalcinosis by high intake of vitamin K in rats.
    Schurgers LJ, Spronk HM, Soute BA, Schiffers PM, DeMey JG, Vermeer C.
    Blood. 2007 Apr 1;109(7):2823-31.
    PMID: 17138823
    DOI 10.1182/blood-2006-07-035345.

    This is the first study in rats demonstrating that AC and the resulting decreased arterial distensibility are reversible by high-VK intake
Matti Narkia

Vitamin K may reverse arterial calcification - study - 0 views

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    Arterial calcification, a process of hardening of the arteries, may be inhibited and even reversed with supplementation with high-dose vitamin K, suggests an animal study.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D and Vitamin K Team Up to Lower CVD Risk - Part II - 0 views

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    Strong correlations have been noted between cardiovascular diseases and low bone density / osteoporosis-connections so strong that the presence of one is considered a likely predictor of the other. This relationship has led to the hypothesis that these conditions share core pathophysiological mechanisms. Recent advances in our understanding of the complimentary roles played by vitamin D3 and vitamin K2 in vascular and bone health provide support for this hypothesis, along with insight into key metabolic dysfunctions underlying cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis.

    Part II, The Vitamin K Connection to Cardiovascular Health, reviews the ways in which vitamin K regulates calcium utlization, preventing vascular and soft tissue calcification while complimenting the bone-building actions of vitamin D, and also discusses vitamin K safety and dosage issues, and the necessity of providing vitamin K and vitamin A along with vitamin D to preclude adverse effects associated with hypervitaminosis D.
Matti Narkia

High dietary menaquinone intake is associated with reduced coronary calcification.- Sci... - 0 views

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    High dietary menaquinone intake is associated with reduced coronary calcification.\nBeulens JW, Bots ML, Atsma F, Bartelink ML, Prokop M, Geleijnse JM, Witteman JC, Grobbee DE, van der Schouw YT.\nAtherosclerosis. 2008 Jul 19. [Epub ahead of print]\nPMID: 18722618 \ndoi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2008.07.010 \n
Matti Narkia

Vitamin K in the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis and arterial calcification. -... - 0 views

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    Vitamin K in the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis and arterial calcification.\nAdams J, Pepping J.\nAm J Health Syst Pharm. 2005 Aug 1;62(15):1574-81. Review.\nPMID: 16030366
Matti Narkia

Vitamin K - Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University - 0 views

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    Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin. The "K" is derived from the German word "koagulation." Coagulation refers to the process of blood clot formation. Vitamin K is essential for the functioning of several proteins involved in blood clotting (1). There are two naturally occurring forms of vitamin K
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