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Matti Narkia

Bread Fortified with Cholecalciferol Increases the Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrat... - 0 views

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    Bread fortified with cholecalciferol increases the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration in women as effectively as a cholecalciferol supplement.
    Natri AM, Salo P, Vikstedt T, Palssa A, Huttunen M, Kärkkäinen MU, Salovaara H, Piironen V, Jakobsen J, Lamberg-Allardt CJ.
    J Nutr. 2006 Jan;136(1):123-7.
    PMID: 16365070

    Both fortified breads increased serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration as effectively as the cholecalciferol supplement. Supplementation or fortification did not affect serum intact parathyroid hormone concentration or urinary calcium excretion. In conclusion, fortified bread is a safe and feasible way to improve vitamin D nutrition.
Matti Narkia

Benfotiamine nothing but "Snake Oil" - 0 views

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    A popular vitamin supplement is being advertised with claims that are demonstrably untrue, as revealed by research published in the open access journal BMC Pharmacology.

    Benfotiamine is a synthetic derivative of thiamine (vitamin B1). It is marketed heavily as a dietary supplement using a selection of unsubstantiated, 'not-quite-medical' claims that tend to characterize this field. A large part of this campaign has been built around the belief that benfotiamine is lipid-soluble and, therefore, more physiologically active. Scientific research led by Dr Lucien Bettendorff of the Center for Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology at the University of Liège, Belgium, has entirely disproved these claims.
Matti Narkia

Benfotiamine, a synthetic S-acyl thiamine derivative, has different mechanisms of actio... - 0 views

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    Benfotiamine, a synthetic S-acyl thiamine derivative, has different mechanisms of action and a different pharmacological profile than lipid-soluble thiamine disulfide derivatives.
    Volvert ML, Seyen S, Piette M, Evrard B, Gangolf M, Plumier JC, Bettendorff L.
    BMC Pharmacol. 2008 Jun 12;8:10.
    PMID: 18549472
    doi:10.1186/1471-2210-8-10

    Conclusion
    Our results show that, though benfotiamine strongly increases thiamine levels in blood and liver, it has no significant effect in the brain. This would explain why beneficial effects of benfotiamine have only been observed in peripheral tissues, while sulbutiamine, a lipid-soluble thiamine disulfide derivative, that increases thiamine derivatives in the brain as well as in cultured cells, acts as a central nervous system drug. We propose that benfotiamine only penetrates the cells after dephosphorylation by intestinal alkaline phosphatases. It then enters the bloodstream as S-benzoylthiamine that is converted to thiamine in erythrocytes and in the liver. Benfotiamine, an S-acyl derivative practically insoluble in organic solvents, should therefore be differentiated from truly lipid-soluble thiamine disulfide derivatives (allithiamine and the synthetic sulbutiamine and fursultiamine) with a different mechanism of absorption and different pharmacological properties.
Matti Narkia

In vivo characterization of the absorption and biotransformation of pteroylmonoglutamic... - 0 views

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    Lucock MD, Wild J, Smithells RW, Hartley R.
    In vivo characterization of the absorption and biotransformation of pteroylmonoglutamic acid in man: a model for future studies.
    Biochem Med Metab Biol. 1989 Aug;42(1):30-42.
    PMID: 2505816 [PubMed - indexed
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