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Matti Narkia

A Review of Scientific Research and Recommendations Regarding Eggs -- Kritchevsky 23 (S... - 0 views

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    A review of scientific research and recommendations regarding eggs.
    Kritchevsky SB.
    J Am Coll Nutr. 2004 Dec;23(6 Suppl):596S-600S. Review.
    PMID: 15640512

    For much of the past 40 years, the public has been warned away from eggs because of a concern over coronary heart disease risk. This concern is based on three observations: 1. eggs are a rich source of dietary cholesterol; 2. when fed experimentally, dietary cholesterol increases serum cholesterol and; 3. high serum cholesterol predicts the onset of coronary heart disease. However, data from free-living populations show that egg consumption is not associated with higher cholesterol levels. Furthermore, as a whole, the epidemiologic literature does not support the idea that egg consumption is a risk factor for coronary disease. Within the nutritional community there is a growing appreciation that health derives from an overall pattern of diet rather than from the avoidance of particular foods, and there has been a shift in the tone in recent dietary recommendations away from "avoidance" messages to ones that promote healthy eating patterns. The most recent American Heart Association guidelines no longer include a recommendation to limit egg consumption, but recommend the adoption of eating practices associated with good health. Based on the epidemiologic evidence, there is no reason to think that such a healthy eating pattern could not include eggs.
Matti Narkia

COMMITTEE ON NUTRITION: THE PROPHYLACTIC REQUIREMENT AND THE TOXICITY OF VITAMIN D -- C... - 0 views

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    Despite inadequacies in information concerning the minimum prophylactic requirement of vitamin D for all age groups beyond infancy, there is no doubt that a total intake of 400 I.U. per day is adequate to prevent vitamin D deficiency in substantially all normal children from birth through adolescence.

    Evidence derived from the study of idiopathic hypercalcemia suggests that certain infants excessively sensitive to the toxic action of vitamin D may, on rare occasions, be adversely affected by daily intakes of 3,000 to 4,000 I.U. and sometimes considerably less. Because of the prevalent practice of food fortification in the United States and Canada, there is now a definite possibility that the individual, even the young infant, may ingest considerably more than the recommended vitamin D allowance, and intakes of 2,000 to 3,500 I.U. per day are possible, particularly beyond infancy. Although there has been no specific evidence that intakes of this order produce deleterious effects beyond infancy, it is pointed out that the long-term consequences of this new nutritional situation on older children or adults are entirely unknown.
Matti Narkia

Towards an adequate intake of vitamin D. An advisory report of the Health Council of th... - 0 views

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    Towards an adequate intake of vitamin D. An advisory report of the Health Council of the Netherlands
    R M Weggemans, G Schaafsma and D Kromhout
    Eur J Clin Nutr advance online publication, July 22, 2009; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2009.67
Matti Narkia

Opinion of the Scientific Committee on Food on the Tolerable Upper Intake Level of Vita... - 0 views

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    Opinion
    of the Scientific Committee on Food
    on
    the Tolerable Upper Intake Level of Vitamin D
    (expressed on 4 December 2002)
Matti Narkia

Dietary Reference Intakes for vitamin D: justification for a review of the 1997 values.... - 0 views

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    Dietary Reference Intakes for vitamin D: justification for a review of the 1997 values.
    Yetley EA, Brulé D, Cheney MC, Davis CD, Esslinger KA, Fischer PW, Friedl KE, Greene-Finestone LS, Guenther PM, Klurfeld DM, L'abbe MR, McMurry KY, Starke-Reed PE, Trumbo PR.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Jan 28. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 1917674
    doi:10.3945/ajcn.2008.26903
Matti Narkia

n-3 fatty acid dietary recommendations and food sources to achieve essentiality and car... - 0 views

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    n-3 fatty acid dietary recommendations and food sources to achieve essentiality and cardiovascular benefits.
    Gebauer SK, Psota TL, Harris WS, Kris-Etherton PM.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jun;83(6 Suppl):1526S-1535S. Review.
    PMID: 16841863

    Dietary recommendations have been made for n-3 fatty acids, including {alpha}-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to achieve nutrient adequacy and to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease. These recommendations are based on a large body of evidence from epidemiologic and controlled clinical studies. The n-3 fatty acid recommendation to achieve nutritional adequacy, defined as the amount necessary to prevent deficiency symptoms, is 0.6-1.2% of energy for ALA; up to 10% of this can be provided by EPA or DHA. To achieve recommended ALA intakes, food sources including flaxseed and flaxseed oil, walnuts and walnut oil, and canola oil are recommended. The evidence base supports a dietary recommendation of {approx}500 mg/d of EPA and DHA for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. For treatment of existing cardiovascular disease, 1 g/d is recommended. These recommendations have been embraced by many health agencies worldwide. A dietary strategy for achieving the 500-mg/d recommendation is to consume 2 fish meals per week (preferably fatty fish). Foods enriched with EPA and DHA or fish oil supplements are a suitable alternate to achieve recommended intakes and may be necessary to achieve intakes of 1 g/d.
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