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Matti Narkia

Are we meat eaters or vegetarians? Part I | The Blog of Michael R. Eades, M.D. - 0 views

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    "One of the problems - if it could be called a problem - in writing this blog and moderating the comments is most readers are pretty intelligent. Occasionally I have the angry vegetarian wander in, take me to task for my errant ways, and, after a comeback or two on my part, drift away to never be heard from again. Thanks to the confirmation bias, this blog pretty much selects against the non-meat eater. So, I tend to forget how many people there are out there who are pretty much clueless about basic nutrition, and how many people there are who bobble through life spouting cliches they've heard along the way as great nutritional truths. Based on the comments I get on this blog, it seems to me that most people are pretty nutritionally sophisticated and reasonable."
Matti Narkia

Are we meat eaters or vegetarians? Part II | The Blog of Michael R. Eades, M.D. - 0 views

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    "Meat eating made us human. The anthropological evidence strongly supports the idea that the addition of increasingly larger amounts of meat in the diet of our predecessors was essential in the evolution of the large human brain. Our large brains came at the metabolic expense of our guts, which shrank as our brains grew.

    In April 1995 an article appeared in the journal Current Anthropology that was an intellectual tour de force and, in my view, an example of a perfect theoretical paper. "The Expensive-Tissue Hypothesis" (ETH) by Leslie Aiello and Peter Wheeler demonstrated by a brilliant thought experiment that our species didn't evolve to eat meat but evolved because it ate meat.

    It was our gradual drift toward the much higher quality diet provided by food from animal sources that allowed us to develop the large brains we have. It was hunting and meat eating that reduced our GI tracts and freed up our brains to grow. As I wrote at the start of this post, the evidence indicates that we didn't evolve to eat meat - we evolved because we ate meat."
Matti Narkia

Are we meat eaters or vegetarians? Part II | The Blog of Michael R. Eades, M.D. - 0 views

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    Meat eating made us human. The anthropological evidence strongly supports the idea that the addition of increasingly larger amounts of meat in the diet of our predecessors was essential in the evolution of the large human brain. Our large brains came at the metabolic expense of our guts, which shrank as our brains grew.
Matti Narkia

Are we meat eaters or vegetarians? Part I | The Blog of Michael R. Eades, M.D. - 0 views

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    "One of the problems - if it could be called a problem - in writing this blog and moderating the comments is most readers are pretty intelligent. Occasionally I have the angry vegetarian wander in, take me to task for my errant ways, and, after a comeback or two on my part, drift away to never be heard from again. Thanks to the confirmation bias, this blog pretty much selects against the non-meat eater. So, I tend to forget how many people there are out there who are pretty much clueless about basic nutrition, and how many people there are who bobble through life spouting cliches they've heard along the way as great nutritional truths. Based on the comments I get on this blog, it seems to me that most people are pretty nutritionally sophisticated and reasonable."
Matti Narkia

Whole Health Source: paleolithic diet - 0 views

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    Dr. Staffan Lindeberg has published a new study using the "paleolithic diet" to treat type II diabetics (free full text). Type II diabetes, formerly known as late-onset diabetes until it began appearing in children, is typically thought to develop as a result of insulin resistance (a lowered tissue response to the glucose-clearing function of insulin). This is often followed by a decrease in insulin secretion due to degeneration of the insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells.

    After Dr. Lindeberg's wild success treating patients with type II diabetes or glucose intolerance, in which he normalized the glucose tolerance of all 14 of his volunteers in 12 weeks, he set out to replicate the experiment. This time, he began with 13 men and women who had been diagnosed with type II diabetes for an average of 9 years.
Matti Narkia

A Palaeolithic diet improves glucose tolerance more than a Mediterranean-like diet in i... - 0 views

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    A Palaeolithic diet improves glucose tolerance more than a Mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischaemic heart disease.
    Lindeberg S, Jönsson T, Granfeldt Y, Borgstrand E, Soffman J, Sjöström K, Ahrén B.
    Diabetologia. 2007 Sep;50(9):1795-807. Epub 2007 Jun 22.
    PMID: 17583796
    DOI: 10.1007/s00125-007-0716-y

    Conclusions/interpretation A Palaeolithic diet may improve glucose tolerance independently of decreased waist circumference.
Matti Narkia

PaNu - PāNu Blog - H1N1, Vitamin D3 and Innate Immunity - 0 views

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    "I recently received an email from the Vitamin D Council regarding recent evidence that having adequate serum Vitamin D levels could be very important to avoiding illness from the H1N1 (swine) flu that is making the rounds. That will seem intuitive to those of you who read my earlier post about D, but it's good to see some real evidence. Some of you may have seen this information already on other blogs, including Richard's, but I have some new information and some comments to add."
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